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February 26, 1950 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-02-26

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FACULTY FOR KNOWING:
Prof. Stevenson Philosophizes

4

At At At A

By PHOEBE FELDMAN
"Now see here," Prof. Charles
L. Stevenson, of the philosophy
department, said brushing his hair
back as he commented on the
problem of language in the "sci-
ence of wisdom," ". .. just because
you give philosophy another name
doesn't mean it's going to be any
easier."
Prof. Stevenson, who is known
in philosophical circles for his
methodological book, "Ethics and
Language," admitted that he
would like to repudiate the word,
"semantics," because of the way
some, people have begun to asso-
ciate it with "philosophical pana-
cea."
"It seems to me," he remarked,
"that this is something of a case
of the tail wagging a dog, with
merely a division of study being
hailed as the solution to all of
man's puzzling problems. Never-
the less," he added, somewhat in-
consistently, "I have something
of a fondness for tle tail and do.
not always like the dog." ,
- PARADOXICALLY e n o u g h,
Prof. Stevenson was led to phil-
osophy via semantics and lan-
guage. An -English ilterature ma-
jor and music minor graduate of
Yale, 1930, Prof. Stevenson was
already on the boat with his new-
lywed wife to study rcriticism at
Cambridge, when he changed his
mind and decided to study philo-
sophy.
"Iycame across a book by I. A.
Richards while I was on the
boat, and by the time I was
through with that and another
text- on logic by Prof. Sellars,
of the philosophy department,
I had changed courses in mid-
ocean and was set to study what
they termed "moral science" at
Cambridge."
Getting up from his chair and
walking over to his desk, Prof.
Stevenson remarked that he ima-
gined that he probably picked up
his slight British accent during his
three-year stay at Cambridge.
WHEN HE returned to the Uni-
ted States, Prof. Stevenson re-
ceived his doctorate and a teach-
ing appointment at Harvard in
1935. Yale called him back as an
assistant professor four years la-
ter. During his seven-year stay at
Yale, he was awarded a Guggen-
heim Fellowship for his work in
aesthetics.
Perhaps unfairly, Prof. Frank-
ena, of the philosophy depart-
ment, who has known Prof.
Stevenson since their graduate
days at Harvard, tells the tale--
"which he often tells on him-
sl"-of the days when Prof.
Stevenson was touring Europe
with his wife Louise.-
They were going through art
galleries, and Prof. Stevenson,
who admits painting to be his
weakest art, didn't see very much
to get excited about. But at last
he called to Mrs. Stevenson and
said, "Look, this is really a good
one!" Mrs. Stevenson pointed to

Regents Pass
Four Faculty
Appointments
Four faculty appointments were
confirmed by the Board of Re-
gents at their February meeting,
yesterday.
Prof. James T. Wilson was
named executive secretary of the
Department of Geology during the
absence of Prof. K. K. Landes,
who is on sabbatical leave during
the current semester.
* * *
JOHN. W. ATKINSON was ap-
pointed assistant professor of
psychology for a three year term
ben ning next fell. He is cur-
rcntly teaching at Wesleyan Uni-
xersity, Conn.
The sociology department
gained Josephine J. Williams as
an assistant professor. She is
now connected with the Uni-
versity of Chicago.
Clement L. Markert w'.s ap-
pointed as assistant professor of
zoology for 1950-51. He is now
with the Nat (l Researc ,.n-
ci? at 'he California Institute of.
Technology. -
The Regents also accepted gifts
totaling $41,138.22. Non-monetary
gifts included four television sets
from the students of Stockwell,
Anderson, Strauss and Williams
residence halls for their respective
houses.

February, a month already fa-
mous for Lincoln, Washington and
St. Valentine, claims an added
distinction here at the University
-- the little man wth the big
hopes, commonly known as
"rushee."
He neither chops down cherry
trees nor splits logs. Cupid's a':
rows aren't down his line, either.
But he's just as important to
members of campus fraternities as
beer or mascots.

THIS MONTH, more than 400
of 'em answered the call, braving
snow and wind to track down some
of the more remote houses. And
they're still flocking in to tegis-
ter, Bob Preston, IFC Rushing
Chairman said yesterday.
The year-to-year trend in
February rushing numbers has
pointed to a definite unreliabili-
ty of year-to-year trends, a
check of Daily files revealed.
And proportionate to the total
University enrollment, each Feb-

Rushees Add To February Highlights

Welfare ,State' To Be Debated
The merits of the welfare state and its threat to personal free-
doms will be debated by two Scottish students and two University de-
baters at a speech assembly at 4 p.m. tomorrow at Rackham Lecture
Hall.
Jack Wirth, '50, and Ray Daniels, Grad, both members of the
University debate team, will join Malcolm Low, from the University
of Edinburgh, and David Reid, from the University of Glasgow, for
the debate.
Reid, a graduate law student, and Low, who received his degree
in medicine last year, were chosen by debating organizations- in their
respective schools to tour the United States and participate in inter-
national student discussions.
The "Michigan style" debate, in the nature of a cross-examina-
tion, will be used, while an audience participation period will be
held at the end.

ruary's rushing roster - at least
for the past four years - has had
some sort of new .ruling sprung on
it.
- * * *
IN MARCH, '46, for instance,
an Interfraternity Council deci-
sion provided for a two-week reg-
istration period for all spring
term rushees, to be followed by
"open houses." Rushees then
numbered 450.
"No open houses" was the
watchword the next February,
as IFC clamped down on the
customary tradition. To make
matters worse, only ten days -
Feb. 17 to 27 - were allotted.
for rushing in '47, and only
about 250 signed up.
Things were remedied slightly
in the winter of 1948 when 25
fraternities and 320 anxious
rushees battled it out for nearly
two months, Feb. 15 to Apr. 3.
* * *
BUT STATISTICS were thrown
back in confusion last February
with the registration of only 377
men - hardly impressive enough
to rate with 1946's 450 figure, a
result of the veteran influx into
colleges that winter.
Trends, however, haven't both-
ered the rushees a bit through the
years; it's just so much baloney
to them, fraternity men have dis-
covered.

Airedon WJ
Douglas Sinn, '50, and Victor
Hurtwitz, Grad, will discuss the
problems of legalizing "Mercy
killing" at 1 p.m. today over De-
troit radio station WWJ, on the
"Leaders of Tomorrow" series.
Students from the University
alternate with representatives
from Wayne and the University of
Detroit, as discussion participants
on this new radio series.
A scholarship award is present-
ed every month to the student who
is deemed by a board of judges to
be the best radio participant.
Nafe Ketter, Grad, and Ray,
Daniels, Grad, are the regular mo-
derators representing the Univer-
sity.
Students InJused
Three University students are
recuperating today from a mid-
night tobogganing accident in the
Arboretum Friday night.
The injured students still in
the University hospital are Ade-
laide Klingbeil, '50, and Henri
Wilson, '51. Gene Overbeck, '51,
was released yesterday after re-
ceiving stitches. Doris J. Buser,
'51, the fourth member of the par-
ty, was not injured.

.4

The assembly is sponsored
be open to the public.

by the speech department and will

-Daily-Alan Reid
PROFILE--Prof. Stevenson, of the philosophy department, sits
at his desk, contemplating a book. A more characteristic lecture
position is poised with one leg top-desk-side, or perched on top
of the desk, cross-legged, tailor-fashion. For this Radcliffe women
once dubbed him "the philosophy professor who sits like Bhudda."

WAHR'S

&ma 4I4v O&l!

f4

* .*
venson saw that it was a Botti-
celli-"The Birth of Venus."
. * * *
PROF. STEVENSON said that
he has always been interested in
writing from the point of view of
the aesthetician, he has never had
any creative writing ambitions
himself.
"I might have been interested
in music professionally-I be-
gan studying piano when I was
eight--but I didn't really get
started until it was too late to
do anything with it."
Prof. Stevenson, about whom
there have been rumors also of
lute playing, said he "blushed to
confess" that he recently had tak-
en up the 'cello-"which my oldest
daughter, Anne, 17, made the mis-
take of leaving around the house
between her lessons."
His decision to learn has, by
his own standards, apparently
not been too successful, because
"when I straddle the 'cello and
play it, frankly I think it sounds
more like a sick cow groaning,
than music." But he added that he
likes browsing in the atmosphere
of old string shops, and investi-
gating string music.
* * *
HE PAUSED to round out his
family picture by remarking that
he also had two younger daugh-
ters, Diana, 14, and Laura, "who
is just three years old," and that
they own a dog, Roddy-an Eng-

* *
Mrs. Stevenson when they were
freshmen in high school in Cin-
cinatti-and married her on grad-
uating from Yale.
Prof. Stevenson's honest hu-
manity is probably best shown
in his moving up the chronolo-
gical designation of middle-
agedness, in his lecture exam-
ples on vagueness, as he grows
older himself.
And the confusion concerning
his ethical system was probably
best revealed in a remark made
about him at the Christmas meet-
ing of the Eastern Division of the
American Philosophical Associa-
tion-where his system was the
dominant topic.
Said one philosopher to the
other facetiously, "Why even Ste-
venson believes in honesty."
TYPEWRITERS
RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT
REPAIRED
G.I. Requisitions
Accepted on Supplies Only
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