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February 26, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-02-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AGE SIX

THE, MI11IG AN. D.A-I LY

SUNDAY, FEBRU~IARY 26, 1950E

4qI~ U~ A
U21

Panels Continue Education Conference

(Continued from Page 1)

r

Following Mr. Kauffman's
speech, the Conference broke up
into three panel discussions. In
the opening plenary session of the
conference the; movement was
passed that no resolutions be
adopted by the panels.
This was undertaken at the re-
commendation of the steering
committee, which felt that all the
time should be spent for the work-
ing out of. techniques and the ex-
changing of ideas, Hayes McNutt,
chairman of the committee, ex-
plained.
THE PANEL on academic free-
dom, directed by George Abbe of

Wayne University, discussed the
various limitations placed on free-
dom of speech at their respective
campuses, such as the necessity
of securing administrative approv-
al on all speakers.
Tom Byers, Grad., led the
panel on discrimination. The
problem of discriminatory ques-
tions on application blanks was
considered. Participants cited
the "passing the buck" policy
of the administrators of their
respective schools.
The panel on international rela-
tions was led by Prof. Kenneth
Boulding of the economics depart-
merit. Various ideas on ways of

reaching agreement with Russia,
outlawing the atomic and hydro-
gen bombs, and securing world
government were "thrown into the
pot" for consideration.
* * *
THE PANELS will continue to-
day from 10:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.'
and from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
The Rev. Charles A. Hill of De-
troit will address the Conference
on "Discrimination and Educa-
tion" at 2:30 p.m. today in the
Assembly Room of the Union. The
closing session of the Conference
will be held at 4:30 p.m., during
which the final reports from the
panels will be presented.

'Camnpus' Hits
StandTuesday'
"Campus," new pictorial maga-
zine, will make its second appear-
ance Tuesday on campus and in
newstands, according to Al For-
man, '50E, editor.
"We've doubled the amount of
pictures," Forman said. "We'll
feature photo stories on the park-
ing problem; Prof. Price, who
plays the Burton carillon; and
campus artists."
"There'll be pictures of beauti-
ful coeds, a behind-the-scenes
view of local chefs and an expose
on telephone operators," Forman
said.

LIVE 'UNDER BRITISH THUMB':
Student Describes Conditions in Native Trans-Jordan

* * * *

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By JOAN WILLENS
With awareness of his country's
problems and ideas of his own
about industrializing it, Kamel
Shair, Grad., is a good example of
the potentialities of Trans-Jordan
and the Arabian countries.
The 23-year old chemical engin-
eering student, who attended the
American University of Beirut at
Lebanon for two years and then
came to the United States for
the technical training he desired,
will receive his Master's degree
this June. He plans to return in
September to work on his doc-
torate.
EVENTUALLY, Shair plans to
return to his native land to start
a factory of his own, devoted to
extracting minerals from the Red
I Sea.
Born in Salt, a town of 10,000
in Trans-Jordan, Shair pointed
out the lack of modern conven-
ience of his native town. "We use
kerosene lanterns and our water
is carried from nearby springs
by donkeys. The only trouble is
that when the donkeys are sick,
we just don't drink water," he
added..
There are no high schools for
women, just the six year grammar
schools, and few girls attend those,
he said. The few women who wish
to pursue more advanced studies
must go outside the country.
THE REASONS for the prevail-
ing backward conditions in Trans-
Jordan are more important than
the conditions themselves, Kamel
believes.
"It is definitely not because

education with the general cur-
riculum of the United States,
Kamel claimed Arabhs have a
much harder time of it, since
each student is required to take
three years of chemistry and
four years of physics and is al-
lowed no electives:
Describing the social customs of
his country, which are still rem-
nants of an ancient civilization,
Kamel said that over half of the
Arabian marriages are still trans-
acted by parents with the bride
not seeing her husband until her
wedding day.
* * *
"ALL MOSLEM GIRLS and the
older generation Christian women
still wear veils when they are out-
side of their home, or when any
stranger is present," he said. And
at least two-thirds of the women
dress in their native costumes,
depending upon how much educa-
tion they have had, he added.
Poligamy is fading out, and
divorce has become a legal insti-
tution requiring court procedure,
Kamel said.. Up until four years
ago, if a Moslem man wanted a
divorce, all he had to do was to
say "I divorce you" to his wife
three times, and the deed was
accomplished.
Kamel's major hobby is travel-
ing, and he has done rather well
at it, considering, he has been in
33 states, in the less than three
years he has been in the United
States.
His plans for the immediate fu-
ture include going home this sum-
mer to marry his girl friend from
Trans-Jordan, with whom he went
to school at the University of
Beirut.

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
TRANS-JORDANITE-Kamel Shair, Grad., only Trans-Jordan
student enrolled at the University, tells an interesting story of
his country's traditions and present backward condition. °

Swing Low

TOWN and COUNTRY SHOES

my people are dumb, but that
King Abdullah is directly under
the thumb of the British," he
declared.
He charged that the mayors of
the towns, such as Salt, are ap-
pointed by the British authorities
and are advised by them. In the
same way, he said, the decisions
of Abdullah, who must approve
every bill before it is submitted

to Parliament, really come from
the British.
* * *
"THE ENGLISH would rather,
fool the Arabs this way, than put
a British dictator on the throne.
And since the present government
is not encouraging any kind of
social or political improvement,
we can't do anything about it."
Comparing his high school

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Arts Chorale
Issues Call
If you like to sing and are inter-
ested in warbling along with some
160 present choralers under the
direction of Prof. Maynard Klein,
Arts Chorale is open to you.
Made up of students, faculty
members and townspeople Arts
Chorale got its start last year. The
group has since performed in sev-
eral concerts both on and off cam-
pus.
Rehearsals are held at 7 p.m. in
Rm. B Haven Hall on Wednesdays.
Final auditions will be held at
that time this week.
The Chorale will then begin in-
tensive rehearsing for a concert
in Tecumseh on March 14.
According to Phoebe Williams,
Arts Chorale member, the organi-
zation affords "fine musical train-
ing" as well as "just plain lots of
fun."
A Tonsorial Artist
takes pride in creating a
New Hair Style for You.
9 Barbers - Queries Invited
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

It

(Continued from Page 4)

I.Z.F.A. Evening. 8 p.m., Hillel
Foundation. Movie: "Assignment
Tel-Aviv." Refreshments. Every-
one welcome.
Social Research Group: Meet-
ing, 7:30 p.m., Rm. 3-S, Union.
Topic: Employee relations with
union and with management in a
large corporation. Speaker: W. W.
Charters, Survey Research Center.
Grad Outing Club: Meeting, 2:15
p.m., northwest entrance of Rack-
ham for skating, hiking, coasting
(with or without sleds). All grads
invited.
Operation Beacon: Second organ-
izational meeting for all students
from Commonwealth of Nations
and British Dependent Empire,
2:30 p.m., 3R, Union.
U. of M. Theatre Guild: Meet-
ing and election of officers, 2:30
p.m.,, League.

YOU LIVE IN

Rising Star

U. of M. '"Hot Record Society:
"Old Time Jazz Revival," League
Ballroom, 8 p.m. Everyone in-
vited.
Hillel Foundation: Open Meet-
ing, 2:30 p.m., at the Foundation.
This meeting is a prerequisite for
student council aspirants.
Coming Events
Unitarian Student Group: 6:15
p.m., Mon., Feb. 27, dinner at the
church with Prof. Hideo Kishi-
moto, head of the Department of
the Science of Religion, University
of Tokyo. "Japanese Unitarian-
ism." For reservations call 2-0085.
Michigan Society for Quality
Control: Am. 35, Union, 7:30 p.m.,
Mon., Feb. 27, Dr. J. H. Toulouse,
Chief Engineer, Quality and Spe-
cifications Department, of the Ow-
ens-Illinois Glass Co. will speak on
"Quality Control in the Glass In-
dustry." All interested are invited.
Hopwood Freshman Prize Con-
test. Address by Asso. Prof. Arno
L. Bader and announcement of
prize awards, 4:15 p.m., Mon., Feb.
27, Rackham Ampitheater. Public
invited.
Michigan Gothic Film Society:
Meeting, Mon., Feb. 27, 8 p.m.,
Rackham Ampitheater, Feature-
length French comedy, "The Ital-
ian Straw Hat" (1927, Rene Clair).
Members may bring guests' pro-
vided arrangements are made in

advance with either president
Hampton or treasurer Whan, ext.
2784.
Ballet Club: The Club will not
meet on Mon., Feb. 27, as many
members of the Club will be at-
tending The Ballet Russe de Mon-
te Carlo at the Michigan Theatre.
All are urged to attend the follow-
ing meeting, Mon., Mar. 6, 7 p.m.
La P'tite Causette. 3:30 p.m.,
Mon., Feb. 27, League.
Sophomores and Juniors inter-
ested in positions of assistant man-
agerships for baseball varsity come
to Yost Field House between 2-4
p.m., Tues., Feb. 28.
Sociedad Hispanica : Social hour
Mon., 4-6 p.m., International Cen-
ter. Refreshments.
Faculty Women's Club, Tuesday
Play Reading Section. Meeting,
1:45 p.m., Feb. 28, League.
Research and Journal Discussion
Group, Electrical Engineering De-
partment: Meeting Tues., Feb. 28,
4 p.m., 3072 E. Engineering. Mr.
Warren D. McBee will discuss
"Some Electronic Aspects of Mod-
ern Kinetic Theory."
Young Republican Club: Annual
meeting, 7:30 p.m., Tues., Feb. 28,
3A Union. Election of officers.
Bring membership cards.

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