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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 30, 1950 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


ElSbAtt M13050 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Panhell Board
Reveals Posts
* Central committee positions for
next year's annual Panhellenic
projects have been announced by
the members of the Panhell Board.
General chairman of the tradi-
tional Panhellenic Ball will be
Barbara Elliott, while Nancy Born
will serve as assistant chairman.
REFRESHMENTS will be taken
care of by Beverly Mae Brown and
her committee while Jan Denham
will be in charge of the patrons.
Lois Eisele will head the committee
devising the decorations and Mary
Jo McCormick will take care of
the tickets.
Programs will be under the di-
rection of Laury Lamy and her
committee while Elaine Madden
will see to the publicity angles of
the dance. The buildings and
grounds committee will work un-
der the leadership of. Mary Lou
Porter.
This coming year the Panhellen-
ic Workshop, held annually Ito
help the various houses on cam-
pus solve their individual prob-
lems, will be under%the chairman-
ship of Beverly Dunn.
MARTHA BRYANT will be in
charge of the workshops programs,
and Mary Muller will take care of
the financial aspects of the pro-
ject.
Assistant chairman of the an-
nual Panhell Variety Show will
be Mary Watt. Barbara Moly-
neaux will handle the newspaper
publicity for the show, and dis-
plays and posters will be the
task of Kathleen Rose and her
committee.
New assistant recording secre-
tary for the Panhellenic Board is
Enid Frank.
JOBS OPEN
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC
Immediate need for office help, pay-
roll clerks, timekeepers, engineers,
* draftsmen, skilled & unskilled work-
ers all types, on large Government
& private contracts in United States,
Hawaii, England, Belgium, Italy,
' Germany, Iran, South America, Far
East. Living quarters, transporta-
tion, high pay. For information on
these job contracts and application
blanks, send $1,00 mailing charge to :
Employment Information Center.
Dept. 0o1 23, P.O. Box 4, Brockline
46, Mass. No other fee or charge of
any kind. Delivery guaranteed. We
are Bonded. Members of Brookline
Chamber of Commerce.

Women's Editor Betrothed

BARBARA SMITH
* ..* *
CouplesMake Wedding Plans

Brides Choose
Sheer Pastels
Flowers Add Color,
Gaiety toWeddings
With the usual appearance of
coeds bedecked with diamond rings
each spring comes the thoughts of
summer weddings.
The 1950 Spring bride will wear
pale pink organdy with a "little
woman" look if she's the prototype'
of the latest showings in bride
magazines. The whole wedding
party may be dressed in the palest
blush tones if the bride feels she
would like to break away from tra-
ditional white.
* * *
OTHERnFASHIONnnews that
bridal consultants and buyers
found at their yearlyf session of
classes was the monochromatic
wedding party-shades of one col-
or in different tones,
Bridesmaids who can change
their accessories and become the
belles of the )ball at parties
showed the trend to real party
dresses that the designers sug-
gest to the practical members of
today's wedding party.
An outdoor wedding goes "back
to nature" with flowers, birds, and
bees featured in the wedding dress,'
the bridesmaids' accessories and
the headdresses.
* * *
FLOWERS LOOK new, too, in
arrangements suggestive of old-
French flower prints. Bouquets are
carefully planned to give a care-
less collected confusion of colors
as if they were flowers just picked'
from the garden. This looseness'
of arrangement and variation of
color contrasts with the usual for-
mal look of stiffly-balanced bou-
quets in blank one-color arrange-
ments.
The plan for the 1950 bride
reflects fashion's neat head, the
hand-span waist and skirts bell-
ed out with numerous crinolines
to fill the aisle.
Wedding hats replacing floral
headdresses give new importance
to the head and often show the
roundness of it in cloche wedding
hats.

By BARBARA SMITH
Joining the ranks of noted Mi-
chigan alumni, Celia Huan, a stu-
dent at the University from 1936
to 1945, has been widely acclaimed
throughout the East for her skill
as a pianist.
She is at present giving concerts
at Boston University.
* * *
BORN IN Shanghai, Miss Huan
earned manifold honors and
awards while studying in Ann Ar-
bor. She received a Bachelor's de-
gree in music with distinction in
piano as well as a B.A. and M.A.
in philosophy.
Proof of her versatility is ap-
parent from the fact that she
was the recipient of a major
Hopwood award in English es-
say.
Other honors awarded to her
include a four year Barbour schol-
arship, membership in Phi Beta
Kappa, a University fellowship and

the Eugene Saxton Memorial Fel-
lowship for creative writers.
* * .*
ANOTHER distinction was add-
ed to her record when Prof. Roy
Wood Sellars chose her as his as-
sistant. She became the first Chi-
nese to be honored with an assist-
antship at the University.
In 1945 Miss Huan completed
her residence work for a Ph.D.
and traveled to Cleveland, with
seven dollars in her pocket, to
specialize in piano under Beryl
Rubenstein. Rubenstein, s h e
claims, was the most profound
musical influence in her life.
In addition to her formal train-
ing under the American composer-
pianist, Miss Huan profited from
studying Rubenstein's own per-
formances as recitalist and as so-
loist with the Cleveland Symphony
Orchestra.
* * *
THE BRILLIANCE of Celia Hu-

an's career is not quite so aston-
ishing when one views her rich
background. Her mother, who has
been an active physician in
Shanghai, gave Miss Huan her
first piano lessons.
Her father, son of a noted
Chinese scholar, was the founder
and first president of the Na-
tional Chi Nan University in.
Nanking. He has published many
works including treatises on La-
otze's philosophy, Chinese his-
tory, political theories and poe-
try.
Before attending the University
Miss Huan studied at Ginling Col-
lege in Nanking. She originally in-
tended to specialize in physics and
mathematics, but was pursuaded
by her piano teacher to devote
her major efforts to music.
Miss Huan's concerts have been
greeted with high praise from mu-
sicians and critics.. A review in
the Boston Globe stated: "It is of-
ten said that Orientals have diffi-
culty with the syntax of Western
music. Not so Miss Huan, who dis-
played the most delicate sensibili-
ties...
"She has an innate feeling for
the secrets of musical expression
and therefore her playing offers
thorough satisfaction."
Read Daily Classifieds

Celia Huan Joins Ranks of Noted 'U' Alumni;
Pianist's Ability Proclaimed Throughout East

Willow Wives
To HoldPart
The Willow Village Wives C
will hold their farewell party
8 p.m. Wednesday at the Univ
sity Community Center.
Margaret Post will sing s
Mary Robinson dance at the pa
which features a caberet them)
Diplomas will also be given
those who are leaving in Ju
July, or August.
The committee includes the I
lowing: Pat Hickox, the chairm
Loree Maple, Dorine Knaske, Ru
Flecher, Barbara Beglau, Je
Hill, Janet Lambert, and Pat W
Special refreshments will be s
ved. A photographer will be at
party, so members are asked
bring money to pay for picturi
a4
Opportunity in Busine
rhere are never enough Gibbs-train
secretaries to meet thepersistent dema
Wirite College Course Deanjot catalog
Kathariae Gibi
30 Park Ave., NEW YORK lI 33 Plymouth St., MONTC
1 E. Superior St, CHICAdO 11 155 oe St, PROVIDEN[
SO Marlboraggh St.. BOSTON 1S

Smith-Jan s
Mr. and Mrs. C. Raymond
Smith of Reading, Pa.' have an-
nounced the engagement of their
daughter, Barbara, to James P.
Jans, son of Mr. and Mrs. John T.
Jans of Detroit.
Miss Smith, a junior in the lit-
erary college, is the Women's Edi-
tor of The Daily. She is affiliated
with Alpha Chi Omega.
Mr. Jans will receive a Masters
degree in mathematics in June. He
is a member of the Board in Con-
trol of Student Publications and
formerly was president of the Stu-
dent Legislature.
AnnAugust wedding is being
planned.
* ~* *
Baldwin-Roemisch
Mr. and Mrs. Guy Baldwin of
Jackson, Michigan have announc-
ed the engagement of their daugh-
ter, Betty Joan, to Roger W. Roe-
misch, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. H.
Roemisch, also of Jackson, Michi-
gan.
Mr. Roemisch is a graduating
senior in the School of Business
Administration and the president
of Hayden House in East Quad.
The couple are planning a late

summer wedding in the Jackson
First Methodist Church chapel.
* * *
Childs-Jones
Mr. and Mrs. Smith Childs of
Jackson, Tennessee, have an-
nounced the engagement of their
daughter, Mary Grace Childs, to
Lloyd Jones, son of Mr. and Mrs.
M. Lloyd Jones of Jackson, Michi-
gan.
The engagement was announced
on April 6 by Miss Childs to her
sorority sisters. A junior in the
literary college, she is a member of
Kappa Alpha Theta.
Jones is affiliated with Psi Up-'
silon. He is a senior in Business
Administration.
The couple is planning a fall
wedding.
New Look in Coiffures
Features Stylish Bangs
This year will be a big year for
bangs in hair styles, say fashion
experts.
The 1950 bang, however, is not
just the customary fringe in front
but may circle the whole head and
range from a little-girl effect to a
smooth Grecian wreath.
An all around bang is shadow-
waved from the crown with the
edges turned under. The hair is
not parted but brushed from the
crown of the head.
Smooth and sophisticated is the
kiss-curl bang that swirls over the
cheeks and forehead. The hair is
side-parted and brushed forward
from the ears.
A little-girl look is created by
slightly curly bangs across the
forehead joining waved side pieces.
Side and back hair curls up and
forward to form a fluffy frame.

A MAN IN THE HOUSE:
Stockwell To Be Residence
For House Director, Husband

A family of five hundred is a
pretty staggering order for any-
one to undertake, but that is the
task which Miss Muriel Efty and
her fiance will assume next fall
when they will begin to be mother
and father to the residents of
Stockwell Hall.
It has been announced by the
DeanofWomen's Office that ar-
rangements have been made for
Miss Efty to continue as Resident
Director of the dormitory after
her marriage this summer. She
and her husband will live in the
Resident Director's apartment in
Stockwell Hall.
It is a trend on some campuses

and in several of the men's dormi-
tories here at the University to
have married couples as directors
in the dormitories, but this is the
first time that it will be tried in a
women's hall here.
Having a married couple in
charge of the dormitory will pro-
vide an atmosphere of family life
for the girls who live there.
"We are delighted," says Dean
Bromage, "to be able to have the
opportunity to keep Miss Efty as
Resident Director after she is mar-
ried and to have she and her hus-
band call Stockwell Hall their
home."

i

A

r

7The l4jobeth iVZilon he
South State St. - Just off North U. in ampus Town
SCHOOL END
STOREWIDE SAVINGS
Begins Tomorrow -
Reductions to
and below
original prices
Spring Coats - Suits
Dresses-- Skirts - Blouses
Handbags - Costume Jewelry
Gloves - Hats
THE COATS . .. Long &- Short Toppers
Originally from $35.00 to $69.95
Sizes 9-20
THE SUITS ... 100% wool tweeds - crepes -
sharkskins - gabardine and tricoteen
Originally $39.95 to $69.95
Sizes 9-15 10-42 121/2 to241/2
Two groups of rayon sharkskin and
gabardine SUITS
$10.00 and $14.95
Orig. $16.95 to $25.00
Sizes 9-18

RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT
REPAIRED

TYPEWRITERS

4
Carry a STUDYTOUR PASSPORT
and enjoy the wonderful feel.
ing of being welcome wherever
you go!Is
June to Sept., ISA also operates PASSpo
weekly low-cost student flights openIed to
to STUDYTOUR PASSPORT holders
traveling for an educational purpose.
I/V TLEPNAIA770/VAc.
ST ATOALL/ATNINC.C.
12 EAST 48th STREET " NEW YORK 1 7. N. Y.

~ MICHIGAN
fJTHOUSANDS of Michigan Graduates are proudly wearing the
o OFFICIAL Michigan ring. It instantly identifies them as gradu-
O ( ates of a great University.
SWE HAVE THEM IN STOCK for immediate delivery. Your initials
S and last name are beautifully engraved with our compliments,
and we guarantee the quality and fit.
O STOP IN and try yours on today. There is no obligation; but if you
do decide that you must have one, a very srpll deposit will hold
0
~ our selection.
DON'T DELAY-quantities and sizes are limited.
ri L. G. BALFOURI Co.
S 1319 S. University Tom and Meredith Sucking

G.I. Requisitions
Accepted on Supplies Only
MORRI LLS

314 S. State St.

Ph. 7177

&

fountain pens repaired

,qqft MOOF

1

lRa in ..

0

or Shine

F.-

.Si

-k

I

A

5

/

|I

You'll look your
best in a bright, new
raincoat . . . pick
yours from many
styles, colors, and
materials . . . all
rainproof . . . satin,
taffeta, poplin,
gabardine . . .
slickers and eaves in
plaid, checks or
plain shades . . .
sizes 8 to 18 and
7to 15...
to

1-5

P.

WEDNESDAY

I

DAYTIME DRESSES
Sizes 9-15-10-44-121/-24/2
Pure Silks - Nylon Prints
Rayon Crepes
Prints - Nylsilks
1 piece and suit styles
Originally $10.95 to $35.00
Also
Evening and Dinner Dresses
Sizes 9-40

HANDBAGS
Plastic, Patent, and Calf
Failles, Cordes, and Leathers
$1.98 to $5.00
Orig. $3.95 to $10.95
COSTUME JEWELRY
Earrings, Pins, Necklaces,
Bracelets ,and Rinams

I

BRING YOUR RECEIPTS

I

I

~1

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