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May 25, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

S'HE 'IICHIGA DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 2t, 190

THeMCIGNDAL TflUSDA. MA 2&19

'UNG T R,

CLUB SHRU

:

Stump Speakers Seek Missing Bell'

EVEN PTA PESTERS:
Davies Tells Headaches
Of Hollywood Writers

By BILL LANOUETTE
The members of Sigma Rho Tau
are making an extensive search
for their lost Tung Oil Bell in the
hopes of recovering it for the
club's annual Tung Oil Banquet
to be held Friday.
"The bell has become a tradi-
tional fixture at the banquet
Since it was found missing from
its safe-keeping place in East
Hall, the boys have been frantical-
ly searching everywhere for it,"
Robert D. Brackett, advisor, of the
engineer's stump speaking soci-
ety said.

, . _ ..,
._: _.
_.. e ,_ .

PROF. BRACKETT explained
the meaning of tung oil: "We
have adopted the tung tree as our
club shrub because tung oil is a
necessary tool for all good speak-
ers "-
Because the members strive
for perfection in speaking, they
insist upon this same perfection
in guest speakers.
After the guest speakers have
had their alotted time, the bell is
rung so loudly that further ora-
tory is impossible. "We must ad-

journ on time. Thais ,why the
bell is so necessary," moaned Prof.
Brackett.
"NOT ONLY HAS the bell be-
come an integral part of our or-
ganization, but it is also a land-
mark of Ann Arbor's history. It
was used in our first courthouse
to call the community to meetings.
It also clanged the warnings of
Ann Arbor's last Indian raid," he
continued.
When the courthouse was re-
modeled, the bell was given to
the Arbeiters Schaft, a union
for the town's workers.
The organization slowly died
out as the community grew, un-
til only four men remained on
** *

Creative writing is an attempt
on the part of one person to con-
vey an idea or an emotion, and
his career is measured by the de-
gree to which he succeeds, Valen-
tine Davies, '27, said yesterday in
his lecture on "Creative Writing
for the Screen" at Rackham Am-
phitheatre.
"Pictures are a big business and
the film writer is the only one
Weather Jobs
Open in Air
Force Reserve
Opportunities to acquire a
practiced weather eye and a tech-
nical rating in the Air Force Re-
serve are now open to University
men student.
According to Dayle D. Rippe,
head of the Corollary Weather
Service Unit at Selfridge Field,
about 40 positions as weather
technicians are waiting to be fill-
ed by young men interested in
weather observing and a rating
in the organized reserve.
ANY MALE over 17 who can
pass the Air Force physical and
mental tests is eligible to enter
the program.
After becoming a member of
the unit by signing up for a
three-year period, the volunteer
will spend one weekend per
month in training with the unit
at Selfridge Field.
Some of the technical jobs to be
learned by the new members in-
clude ordinary weather observing
which deals with atmospheric
pressure, temperature, winds and
humidity and electronic observa -
tion of weather elements aloft,
according to Rippe.
A voluntary two-week tour of
active auty is also offered.
Rippe asked those interested in
further information to contact
him by phone at Ypsi 4556--R13.

IT'S A
MUSICAL CIGARETTE BOX

Available for the first time-this most attractive and
unusual novelty for every student of the University of
Michigan. The mnsic movement, which plays the most
popular of all college songs, has been imported from
Switzerland exclusively for students and alumni of the
University of Michigan. The handsome cigarette box is,
made of dark mahogany-the finsh is hand rubbed. Avail-
able only by mail: $8.95 Postpaid.
Order your music box today. Send your address and
check or money order to:
The John A. Hale Company
521 North Van Buren Street Bay City, Michigan

ANYBODY SEEN OUR BELL?
That's what puzzled members of
Sigma Rho Tau, engineering
stump speaking society, are ask-
ing as they redoubled their ef-
forts to locate the missing tro-
phy in time for their annual
banquet Friday.
* * *
the board of trustees. Sigma Rho
Tau received it as a gift in 1947.
At last report, frantically-
searching engineers had still not
located the bell but one meniber
staunchly declared, "We guaran-
tee the bell will be heard at our
banquet."
Reservations for the banquet
are available at the Union desk
or from Sigma Rho Tau members.
The charge is $2.00 per plate.

writing in a mass medium," Davies
said. Because of this, there are
many problems confronting the
Hollywood writer, he added.
One of these is the system in
which he must work, Davies said.
When the director, producer, and
executive producer all see the story
differently the story that is shot
is, consequently, the composite
view of many people and the ori-
ginal one has been diluted, modi-
fied and compromised all the way
down, he continued.
ANOTHER problem for movie
writing Davies mentioned, is that
every organization has an opinion
of what a picture says and does.
There are all kinds of pressure
groups, he said, among them the
PTA and different psychiatric
groups.
"There is not one week in
which the Screen Writer's Guild
isn't asked that this be added or
this be omitted from a Holly-
wood production," Davies added.
"It is an unfortunate necessity,
a problem that working in a
mass medium presents."
Hollywood has also imposed a
set of arbitrary rules that govern
movie making, he said. "There
are no such restrictions on foreign
films. The 'Bicycle Thief' has
three sequences that could never
go into a Hollywood picture," Da-
vies added.
ONE OF THE greatest disad-
vantages to the screen writer is
that he arrived on the Hollywood
scene late, according to Davies.
"When Edison invented the
kinetiscope people were so en-
chanted by movement that they
paid little attention to the story.
The writer was pretty much ig-
nored until sound came in."
A novel element in Hollywood,
the writer-director, is the new
hope of the industry, Davies de-
clared. "Most of the successful
pictures produced recently are the
works of a writer-director."
He predicted that the future of
the writer in films will improve
and writers will be given a better
chance to express themselves.
Dental Meeting
To tart Today
Approximately 50 dentists will
attend the annual spring seminar
meeting of The American Acade-
my of Periodontology todayf
through Saturday in the Kellogg
Bldg.
Speakers during the three-day
meeting will include Dr. Edwardj
A. Cheney and Dr. Jerome W.
Conn from the University Hospi-
tal who will talk on orthodontics
and endocrinology in relation to
the study of periodontal disease.1
Others participating in the pro-j
gram wil be Dr. Frank M. Wentz,
Ir. Milton B. Engel and Dr. Hugh
T. Carmichael, from the Universi-
ty of Illinois; Dr. Edward J. Ryan,
from Evanston, Illinois; and Dr.
L. S. Fosdick, from Northwestern
University.
The series of lectures on dis-
eases of the gums are sponsored by
the W. K. Kellogg Foundation In-
stitute for Graduate and Post-
graduate Dentistry.

PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S * PAY
1005 Gr.
a ASPIRIN MAPSHAL

New Judges
Selected by
Case, Club
The Case Clubs of the Law
School have announced the selec-
tion of next year's judges who 4
will preside over the clubs' prac-
tice cases.
They are: Lawrence J. Fuller,
presiding judge, Gordon Hue-
schen, Rex Eames, William Milli-
gan, Howard Van Antwerp, David
Dutcher, Richard Watson, Shel-
ton Penn, Donald Leeper, Thomas
Walsh, and Robert Borsos.
The alternates .are: Mark Bauer,
Wiliam Flashkamp, Paul Harri-
son, James McKim, James Rich-
ardson, and Marlin Scholl.
* * *
ACCORDING TO Gordon Boo-
zer, '50L, this year's presiding
judge, the judges, who are all:Law
School seniors, were selected on
the basis of prior success in case
club work plus a consideration of
their scholastic average.
The Case Clubs of the Law
School are divided into thir-
teen trial groups this year, with
36-40 members in each group.
Generally, each group tries 4
about nine cases a year.
Case club members, freshmen
and juniors who participate as
lawyers in the trials, are given a
hypothetical set of facts to appeal.
In the case club trials a student
prepares his case and goes
through the same procedure that
an attorney does in appealing a
case from a lower court.
The final argument of the case
clubs is heard by a bench of visit-
ing judges. A faculty member sits
as judge with the senior student
judge on junior cases..
All cases are open to the pub-
lic, according to Gordon Boozer,
present presiding judge;

-Daily-wany Bartn
CAMERAS ROLL-Free lance cameraman Russ Carrier photo-
-graphs a group of Korean teachers attending the University Eng-
lish Language Institute, while Dan C. Lawler, of International
Motion Picture, supervises. The movie will be a State Department
information film.
* * * *
U' Korean Student Group
filedy State Department

LESS
CHA
IE

AT MARSHALL'S * PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S
-
MPAGNE Prices Effective Thursday, M
BEER Friday, Saturday (A
BEER We Reserve the Right To Limit
WINE Quantities. Pint
w w w f .

By LEONARD GREENBAUM
Motion pictures of the life of
Korean students at the Univer-
sity will soon be shown in an of-
ficial State Department informa-
tion film throughout the world.
The movie is now being filmed
on campus by Producer Dan C.
Lawler of International Motion
Pictures, a division of the State
Departmnt, and free lance cam-
eraman Russ Carrier.
SUBJECT OF THE FILM is a
group of Korean teachers who are
BusAd Survey
Shows Gripes
Of Students
What students object most to
in the School of Business Admin-
istration are departmental tests
and the lack of coordination in
the briefing of lecture sections,
according to a recent survey con-
ducted by Alpha Kappa Psi, a pro-
fessional business fraternity.
These, as well as other student
opinions, were ascertained in the
survey which interviewed 896
business administration students
and 481 non-business students.
When questioned on past final
exam schedules, most students
voiced their displeasure with the
fact that too many exams occur
consecutively. They also were dis-
satisfied with early exams.
Objective tests also were cri-
ticized. About 70 per cent of the
business students interviewed be-
lieve that the meaning of many
questions on such tests are ob-
scured by vagueness of wording.
Gne iea Lion
Those who submitted mater-
ial for Generation may pick
up their manuscripts any time
in 2213 Angell Hall, according
to Charles Olsen, managing ed-
itor.

attending the University's Eng-
lish Language Institute. Ranging
from university professors to ele-
mentary grade teachers, the Ko-
reans aie studying scientific me-
thods for teaching English as a
foreign language.
Their daily activities from
the time they get up in the
morning until they go to bed at
night are being recorded in the
film.
Shots of the group in class, eat-
ing in the East Quad cafeteria,
watching a footbal scrimmage and
touring the campus are typical of
the scenes to be included.
LAWLER AND CARRIER have
been shooting the group's activi-
ties for a week,'and if the weather
holds, expect to finish by Satur-

i " ~lsV1 liu, o "OQ .
Narration tracks in 27 lan -Miller, chairman of theRevision
guages will be attached to the Committee of the United States
movie by the State Department Pharmacopoeia,. will speak on
prior to release. The film will then "New Tools for Revision," at 7:45
be shipped to embassies and con- p.m. in the Rackham Amphi-
sulate offices throughout the theatre.
world for distribution in foreign The lecture is open to the pub-
countries. lic.

StatePharmacists
To Attend Dinner
Approximately 150 members of
the Michigan branch of the
American Pharmaceutical Asso-
ciation will be present at the an-
nual May dinner at 6:30 p.m., to-
day, in the League.
Following the dinner- L.nl dC

A

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UN'
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U.S.P.

RUBBING
ALCOHOL
9,

Bk

Fountain Special.
Sat. 1-5 p.m. Only

DELI
Cherr
Clip C
PET,
Tall
Limit
3
withc
Popular
CIGAR
Buy the
plus
125F
WA
PAP

CIOUS
y Soda
Coupon
MILK
Can
9c
coupon
r Brands
ZETTES
Carton
[69
tax

Memorial Day Needs
AIR CORPS STYLE
SUN GLASSES 93c,
with case
CLEANSING 1W
TISSUES

Genuine

Oil Tanned
CHAMOIS
1.50 Value
Ili 39ge

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fili, ........ fIiii

HOLIDAY SPECIAL - Rubber
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WATER ANIMALS from

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Cellulose
SPONGES
Large Size

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DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 5)
Carillon Recital by Percival
Price, University Carillonneur, 7:15
p.m., Thurs., May 25, all-Mozart
program, including Romance from
"Eine kleine Nachtmusik", selec-
tions from "Figaro", Andante with
variations from Sonata 18, and
selections from "Die Zauberflote."
String Quartet Class, pupils of
Oliver Edel and Paul Doktor, will
present a program at 4:15 p.m.,
Thurs., May 25, Rackham Assem-
bly Hall. It will open with Haydn's
Quartet, Op. 74, No. 1, in C major,
followed by Beethoven's Grosse
Fugue, Op. 133, and Quartet, Op.
22 by Hindemith. The public is in-
vited.
Exhibitions
Photographs of the work of Wil-
ham Muschenheim, architect of
New York, now visiting lecturer in
the College of Architecture and
Design; through June 10. First
floor corridor, Architecture Bldg.

Canterbury Club: 10:15 a.m.,
Holy Communion.
Camp Davis Registration for
Geologists: Registration of all ge-
ology students (both graduate
and undergraduate) for the Camp
Davis summer session will be held
in 3065 Nat. Sci. Bldg., 7 p.m.
Come prepared to deposit $40 for
transportation and accommoda-
tions on the trip out. All students
who expect graduate credit must
pick up their election cards at the
Graduate School in advance and
bring them to the meeting.
American Pharmaceutical Asso-
ciation, Michigan Branch; open
meeting. "New Tools for Revision."
Dr. Lloyd C. Miller, Director of
Revision, United States Pharmaco-
peia, 8 p.m., Rackham Amphithea-
ter. Persons interested invited.
Aiee-Ire presents the General
Electric "House of Magic" show.
8 p.m., Natural Science Auditor-
ium. Everyone invited.
Student Affiliate of the Ameri-
can Chemical Society: Meeting,
7:30 p.m., 1400 Chemistry Bldg.
Dean Ralph Sawyer will show his
motion pictures on the Atom Bomb
Project and will also give a short
talk.
(Continued on Page 7)

I

4
8.

SALE!

SKYWARD
GOLF BALLS 93"
3 for
Genuine Pennsylvania
TENNIS BALLS $149
Can of Three
Speeds Tan!
SUTRA Sun Ton Lotion 59c
RECORD THE HOLIDAYS
FRESH KODAK FILM - ALL SIZES

33C

1

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Spray 'cm1
Slay 'em!
AEROSOL
DDT BOMBS
98
1Oc bar
PALMOLIVE
SOAP
5'a

Thursday
Friday
Saturday

v1

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$20 TRADE-IN SALE
reg. 69.50 ROYAL
PORTABLE WITH CARRYING CASE

She's Got
Her Date
for

4

floor corridor, Architecture Bldg.
(Continued on Page 7)
4'

Feet
LX
DER
lie

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4
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TRAVEL IRON.-

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$5 Down

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ER-WINE-CHAMPAGNE
TA TA I MIT IEt Icr %n

EASY TERMS

plus
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your old portable regardless of
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backspacer.)

. 1t1-0 2 ogd20/I"

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