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May 21, 1950 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-21

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21, 1954

T MICIiGAND AILY

PAGE

Badgers Trip M' Nin.e in Tenth,

7-6'

I-

Major League Standings

I

AMERICAN LEAGUE

<O> NATIONAL LEAGUE

Netmen Slap Buckeyes, 9-0
For 23d Straight Dual Win

Victory Gives Wisconsin Tie
For Big Ten Baseball Lead

New York
Detroit
Boston
Washington
Cleveland
Philadelphia
St. Louis
Chicago

W
18
16
19
15
15
9
6
5

L
8
8
13
11
11
18
15
19

Pet.
.692
.667
.594
.577
.577
.333
.286
.208

GB
1
2
3
3
91/2
9%/
12

Brooklyn
Philadelphia
St. Louis
Chicago
Boston
Pittsburgh
New York
Cincinnati

W
17
16
14'
12
13
13
10
6

L
9
10
12
11
13
15
12
19

Pet.
.654
.615,
.538
.522
.500
.464
.455
.240,

1
31
4
5
5
10/2

Special to The Daily
COLUMBUS - Michigan's net-
men romped as advertised yester-
day.
The forces of Coach Bill Murphy
dropped only one set in adminis-
tering a 9-0 drubbing to an in-
effective Ohio State aggregation
on the Buckeyes' home courts, for
their 23rd straight dual victory.
* * *
DON MacKAY had the distinc-
tion of starting the rout with an
easy 6-2, 6-1 victory over Guy
Blair. MacKay kept his opponent
flatfooted, as his placements con-
sistantly kicked up chalk along
the baseline.
Co-captain Al Hetzeck soon
Joined his teammate on the
sideline. Hardly working up a
sweat, he quickly erased Len
Schiff, 6-2, 6-2.
Not to be outdone Dick Lin-
coln ajnd Steve Bvonberg also
made-short work of their respec-
tive foes. Lincoln downed Whit-
ney Dillon, 6-1, 6-1, while Brom-

berg had an easy time disposing
of Bill Van Riper, 6-3, 6-2.
The steady right arm of Len-
nie Brumm was the instrument
which delivered the only white-
washing of the afternoon's sin-
gles. He defeated Ron Cox, 6-0,
6-0.
In the number six slot Ross Her-
ron made a stiring comeback to
edge Fred Noble 1-6, 9-7, 6-3.
The doubles was esentially the
same story. MacKay and Hetzeck
started things off with a 6-0, 6-0'
shutout over Blair and Dillon.
Bromberg and Lincoln trounced
Schiff and Gil Dickerson, while
Herron and Brumm brought the
affair to a painless finish with an
easy 6-1, 6-1 triumph over Jim
Karblan and George Camenir.

Special to The Daily
MADISON - Michigan's drive
for its first undisputedaBig Ten
baseball title since 1945 received
a severe jolt yesterday.
Wisconsin's Badgers, trailing 6-5
going into the bottom half of the
tenth inning, pushed across two
last ditch runs that gave the Mad-
ison nine a 7-6 victory over the
Wolverines and a share of Michi-
gan's Conference lead.
ED GRENKOSKI, who had tak-
en over for starter Bob Hicks in
the fifth inning with the score tied
5-5, was charged with the loss, his
first in Big Ten competition.
For Grenkoski it was a tough
one to lose. After having pitched
six innings in Friday's 4-3
heartbreakor, the Wolverine

righthander came in to put an
end to, the three ran Badger up-
rising .that tied the score inthe
fifth and pitched two hit ball
for four frames until the fatal
tenth.
Wisconsin's Ed Keating received
credit for the victory, giving him
a 3-1 mark in the Conference.
Keating had relieved the Bad-
gers' starting pitcher, Gene Rad-
ke, in the second inning.
The Wolverines broke the 5-5
deadlock in the top half of the
tenth on Bob Wolff's double and
Bob Fancett's single to give Gren-
koski a one run lead to work on.
But the Badgers came back in
their half of the frame loading the
bases on two hits and a Michigan
fielder's choice that backfired. The
Wolverines nipped one Wisconsin
run at the plate but failed on the
second attempt, allowing the tying
run to score on a close play at
home.
Paul Furseth came in with the
winning run, scoring after Ralph
Morrison's catch of Keating's cen-
ter field fly.

YESTERDAY'S SCORES,
Detroit 5, Philadelphia 3
Cleveland 8, Boston 5
St. Louis 3, Washington 0
New York 3, Chicago 1

YESTERDAY'S SCORES
St. Louis 7, Boston 4
New York 8-4, Cincinnati 0-3
Chicago 7, Philadelphia 2
Brooklyn 3-4, Pittsburgh 2-3

TODAY'S GAMES

TODAY'S GAMES

New York at Cleveland (2)
Boston at Chicago (2)
Philadelphia at St. Louis (2)
Washington at Detroit.

Pittsburgh at New York (2)
Cincinnati at Brooklyn
Chicago at Boston (2)
St. Louis at Philadelphia (2)

* * * 4.

...
r
-
r
t
i

McEwen

Bests

Varsity

Two -Mile

Mark

"11ff Ii

Gra

I

11,011AID 11

, *
__,_EGE

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typ-4Ttten form to the Office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 2552
Administration Building, by 3:00 p.m.
on the day preceding publication
(11:00 am. Saturdays).
SUNDAY, MAY 21, 1950
VOL. LX, No. 160
Notices
Commencement Exercises will
be held at 5 p.m., June 17, in the
Stadium, w e a t h e r permitting,
otherwise in Yost Field House.
Tickets for Yost Field House (none
necessary for admittance to the
Stadium) will be available for dis-
tribution at the Cashier's Office,
Administration B u i d i n g, on
Thursday morning, June 1. Upon
presentation of identifica-
tion card, each degree candidate
may obtain not more than two
tickets for Yost Field House. Chil-
dren will not be admitted unless
accompanied by adults.
Herbert G. Watkins, Secretary
Graduate Faculty Meeting, Thurs.,
May 25, 4:10 p.m., Rackham Am-
phitheatre. Ballots for nomina-
tion of panel for the Executive
Board of the Graduate Schol
have been sent to members of the
Graduate Faculty and should be
Drought to the meeting.
Student Accounts: Your atten-
tion is called to the following rules
passed by the Regents at their
meeting on February 28, 1936:
"Students shall pay all accounts
due the University not later than
the last day of classes of each se-
mester or summer session. Student
loans which are not paid or renew-
ed are subject to this regulation;
however, student loans not yet due
are exempt. Any unpaid accounts
at the close of business on the last
t day of classes will be reported to
the Cashier of the University and
"(a) All academic credits will
be withheld, the grades for the
semester or summer session just
completed will not be released, and
no transcript of credits will be is-
sued.
"(b) All students owing such
accounts will not be allowed to
register in any subsequent semes-
ter or summer session until pay-
ment has been made."
Herbert G. Watkins, Secretary
Student Loans for Men: Stu-
dents who will be unable to pay,
in full, loans due on or before June
1 should see Mrs. Sullivan, 1020
Administration Building, on or be-
fore Mon., May 22. New loans must
be applied for before June 1. No
loans will be issued after that date
until the opening of the summer
session.
The Queen's University, Belfast,
Ireland offers an exchange schol-
arship for a graduate student from
the University of Michigan, which
will provide fees, board and lodging
for the next academic year. Med-
icine, History and Economics are
suggested as especially appropri-
ate fields of study. Further infor-
mation is available at the Office
of the Graduate School.
Regents-Alumni Scholarships:
Those students whose Regents-
Alumni Scholarships were not re-
-ar-l ilur.. . a ad 9 a -..

Special to The Daily
MADISON-Don McEwen com-
pleted his cycle of record-breaking
distance performances here yester-
day as he cracked the varsity
mark for the two miles with a
beautifully - paced 9:02 clocking
over the outdoor route.
McEwen's performance high-
lighted the triangular meet which
Michigan's track team won, scor-
ing 70 points to Wisconsin's 66%
and Northwestern's 24/.
* * *
THE STRONG young Canadian's
time broke Ralph Scwarzkopf's old
varsity mark of 9:02.3 and also
smashed the stadium record-Bad-
ger Jim Urquhart's 9:20.7.
Don Gehrmann of Wisconsin
raced to a hard-pressed 1:53.2
half-mile win, as Michigan's
Charlie Whitaker ran the best
race of his career to take second
in 1:54.7. Gehrmann won his
other specialty, the mile, in
4:11.8, breaking the stadium rec-
ord of 4:14.2, set by himself last
year.
Bill Konrad was second by inch-
es in the 100 to give the Wolverines
unexpected points in that event.
Northwestern's Jim Holland won
at the tape by a shirt-width.
The Wolverines weren't forced to
a decision in the mile relay to take
the meet, as they were in last
week's Illinois-Northwestern-Mich-
igan triangular affair. But they
came close to taking it anyway.
Konrad was right on the mighty
petition should be in the form of
a letter addressed to the Secretary,
Committee on University Scholar-
ships, 1020 Administration Build-
ing, and should be filed shortly
after grades for the spring semes-
ter are available, or at least be-
fore July 1, 1950.
Summer Work: Detroit Civil
Service Commission announces ex-
aminations for Life Guard (male)
and Swimming Instructors (a male
and a female needed). Closing date
May 26. For further information,
call at Bureau of Appointments,
3528 Administration Building.
Anchorage, Alaska, Public School
System has the following openings
for the coming year: Elementary
Principal; Curriculum Director;
Industrial Arts; Physical Educa-
(Continued on Page 5)

Gehrmann's heels going into the
last leg of the race, and challenged
the track's "splendid splinter" un-
til the last ten yards. But Gehr-
mann had too much for the Wol-
verine sophomore and the Badgers
took the event.
* * *
DON HOOVER continued his
excellent outdoor performances in
the hurdles, as he took both .the
highs and lows to be Michigan's
only double winner.

McEwen's race in the two-
mile was a prime example of un-
erring pace, as the sophomore
distanceman ran 4:32 for the
first mile, 6:46 for the mile and
one-half, and finished up with a
blazing 2:16 last half to break
his fourth varsity distance rec-
ord.
SUMMARIES
Mile Run - 1-Gehrmann,
(W) ; 2-Gordon, (M) ; 3-Parks,
(M); 4-Beck (W). Time 4:11.8

(New
440
(W);
man
48.5

THEY'RE SHIPSHAPE:
Wolverine Sailors Lead
In Midwest Tournamett

Stadium Record)
yard dash - 1-Collins
2-Hlenrie (M); 3-Acker-
(M); 4-Latta (N). Time:

Special to The Daily
COLUMBUS - With six out of
nine races run off yesterday, Mich-
igan's undefeated sailing club
holds a five point lead in the Mid-
western Championship Regatta
being held here on Lake Oshawho-
see.
Nine teams are competing in the
meet, which will be completed to-
morrow and which will determine
the mid-western representative to
the National Sailing Championship
to be held in California this June.
* * *
CLOSE BEHIND the Wolverines
in the scoring is Denison College,
with 90 points to Michigan's 95.
Northwestern follows with 83
points, then come Ohio Wesle-
yan and Ohio State with 79 and
78 points respectively. Notre
Dame, Purdue, Illinois Tech and
Bowling Green bring up the
rear in that order.
As usual, both 'A' and 'B' Di-
vision races were held, with Mich-
igan's capable skipper, Jim Johns,
handling the 'A' dinghy and Gene
O'Connor in charge of the 'B'
boat.
Personality short-cuts!
Try us for Workmanship
Service Personnel
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State

Johns managed to take only one
first place, but his skilled maneu-
vering kept him close to the top
as he also registered a second and
four third places in his six out-
tings.
O'Connor grabbed two first
places and a second in his divi-
Alpha Delta Phi, paced by
Hugh Beath's 82, won the fra-
ternity IM golf tourney yester-
day. Beath was supported by
Carlson's 83, Crispin's 84, and
Bump's 85.
In the residence hall division
Hinsdale House shot its way to
first place by virtue of Aster's
83, Cobb's 86, Perohen's 90 and
Carrol's 96.
sion, but in his other three races
he made rather poor showings by
finishing quite far behind in the
pack.
In meets of this kind the scoring
is based upon the number of boats
that a team finishes ahead of, and
therefore it is a consistent high or-
der of finish that will garner the
most points.

100-yard dash - 1-Holland
(N) ; 2-Konrad (M) ; 3-Englan-
der (W); 4-Reid (W). Time:
10.0
120-yard high hurdles - 1-
Hoover (M) ; 2-Kickert (N); 3-:
Atkinson (W) ; 4-Roberts (W).
Time: 14.6
220-yard dash - 1-Holand
(N) ; 2-Collins (W) ; 3-Henrie
(M); 4-Konrad (M). Time: 22.1
880-yard dash - 1-Gehrmann
(W) ; 2-Whitaker (M) ; 3-Jaco-
bi (M); 4-Solie (W). Time:
1.53.2
Two-Mile run - 1-McEwen
(M); 2-Weekes (W); 3-Williams
(M) ; 4-Firchow (W). Time:
9:02.0 (Breaks Varsity and Sta-
dium Records. Old Varsity Rec-
ord 9:02.3 by Ralph Schwarz-
kopf in 1939)
220-yard low hurdles - 1-
Hoover (M) ; 2-Englander (W) ;
3-Roberts (W) ; 4-Atchison (M).
Time: 23.6
Mile Relay - Won by Wis-
consin (Colins, Ashby, Butler,
Gehrmann); 2-Michigan, 3-
Northwestern. Time: 3:12.8
FIELD EVENTS
Broad Jump - 1-Holland
(N);2-Coleman (M); 3-Soble
(M); 4-Koutonen (M). Dis-
tance: 24 ft. 91/ in.
Pole Vault - 1-Ulvstad (M) ;
2-Welch (W); 3-Elmblad (M);
4-Diangsholt (N) and Minerick
(W), tied. Height: 13 ft. 4 in.
Shot Put - 1-Fonville (M) ;
2-Bleckwenn (W) ; 3-Dendrinos
(M); 4-Albright (W). Distance:
52 ft. 8% in.
Discus Throw - 1-Huxhold
(W); 2-Fonville (M) 3-Dendri-
nos (M); 4-Bleckwenn (W).
Distance: 150 ft. 10/ in.
High Jump - 1-Dunn (N)
and Sullivan (W), tied; 3-Kell-
man (W) and Cherne (W), tied.
Height: 6 ft. %in.

Badger
MICHIGAN ABI
Bucholz 2b 4
Koceski If 4
Morrison of 4
Morrill lb 4
Palmer c 5
Wolff ss 5
Fancett rf 5
Dorr 3b 5
Hicks p 3
Grenkoski p 2
TOTALS 41
x-winning run <

R
1
1
0
1
0
2
0
1
0
0
6

H
0
1
1
2:
0
2
3
3
0
0
12

0
1
0
4
12
5
4
1
1
0
1
29

A
5
0
0
0
0
3
0
2
14

E
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
2

Game

I1N m

scored on sec

ond out in 10th

WISCONSIN AB
Evans 2b 5
Fink ss 4
Wilson c 4
Shea lb 5
Elliott rf 5
Furseth lf 5
Bauer, 3b 2
Lenahan cf 5
Radke p 0
Keating p 5
TOTALS 40
MICHIGAN
WISCONSIN

R H O
1 1 2
01 3
1 0 7
0 2 10
2 1 2
2 3 2
1 0 1
0 1 1
0 0 1
0 1 1
7 10 30
040 010
020 030

A E
2 0
2 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
0 1
6 1
000 1
000 2

,......ACCOUNTING, Elementary .........$.00
..,....ALGEBRA, College-_._........ .. ..1.00
-....ANCIENT HISTORY _.... ~ .............. .75
.......ANC., MED., and MOD. HIST......... 1.25
.......ANTHROPOLOGY, Outline of.. ......
-......BACTERIOLOGY, Prin. of............ 1.25
........BIOLOGY, General ............- .....,. .75
.....BOTANY, General . ._ ....... .. .75
..,....BUSINESS LAWr.............. 1.50
....CALCULUS, The...................... 1.25
_.....CHEMISTRY, First Year Cot.......... 1.25
-~~.CHEMISTRY, Maths. for Gen.. 75
........CHEMISTRY, Organic......... .. 1.50
,......CORPORATION FINANCE ......_._. 1.00
....DOCUMENTED PAPERS, Writ..... .75
-....ECONOMICS, Principles of........ 1.25
-..EDUCATION, History of .....................75
......ENGLAND, History of............75
--...EUROPE, 15001848, Hist. of. .75
.....EUROPE, 1815-1947, History of..1.00
.......EXAMS., How to Write Better...... .25
........FORESTRY, Gen., Outline of....125
..~....FRENCH GRAMMAR ............._.-_
....GEOLOGY, Principles of.......
........GEOMETRY, Plane, Probs. in.
......GERMAN GRAMMAR ......................1.00
........GOVERNMENT, American.........75
_.,......GRAMMAR, ENG. Prin. & Proc. of 1.25
......HYDRAULICS for Firemen........1.00
-....JOURNALISM, Survey of.........1.25
_....LATIN AMERICA, History of ........1.50
......LATIN AMERICA in Maps........1.25
.~,,....LAT. AMER. Civiliz., Rdgs. in. 1.50
....,.LAT. AMER. Economic 0ev........ 1.25

.......LITERATURE, American .. 1.50
........LITERATURE, English, Dict. of....... 1.25
........LIT., English, Hist. to Dryden..... 1.25
........LIT., Eng., Hist. since Milton........ 1.25
....~..LITERATURE, German ........1.50
........LOGARITHMIC & Trig. Tables ......-.60
......MID. AGES, 300-1500, Hist. of...... .75
H.MUSIC, History of............. 1.00
.~......PHILOSOPHY: An Intro...............'1.00
--....PHILOSOPHY, Readings in......_ 1.25
__....PHYSICS, First Year College......... .75
~.POLITICAL SCIENCE............ .75
...POLITICS, Dict. of American.... 1.25
....PORTUGUESE GRAMMAR ... . - 1.25
PRONUNCIATION, Guide to...... 1.50
.PSYCHOLOGY, Educational .- .75
_...PSYCHOLOGY, General . ...... 1.00:
...RUSSIA, History of..............1.50
-_SHAKESPEAREAN Names, Dict... 1.00
--.....SHAKESPEARE'S Plays, Out, of..... 1.00
...~...SLIDE RULE, Practical use of... .75
.SOCIOLOGY, Principles of... ....... 1.25
.-....SPANISH GRAMMAR . .... . 1.00
.STATISTICAL METHODS..........1.25
.STUDY, Best Methads of...... .60
_.......TRIG., Plane & Spherical...:.......... 1.25
TUDOR & STUART Plays, Out..- 1.50
....U. S. in Second World War......._.'.75
.U. S. to 1865, History of.....
.U. S., since 1865, History of........... .75
.W..WORLD, Since 1914, History of-..1.00
........ZOOLOGY, General.............1.00
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE

E

Drop into our store today .. . thumb through a College
Outline covering any of your *courses ... note its meaty
compactness ... its telling paragraph s ... its newspaper-
like efficiency in highlightng essentials and puffing the
story over. You'll be amazed that so much can be got into
so little space. College Outlines are the best high-marks
insurance obtainable. Prepare with them for exams nel
CotteqeOU&i.. seve&

Big Ten
Standings

Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
Ohio State
Illinois
Northwestern
Indiana
Minnesota
Purdue

W
7
7
6
5
6
4
1
1

L
3
3
3
3
5
4
7
6
6

Pct.
.700
.700
.667
.625
.545
.500
.300
.143
.143

* * *
Iowa 3-7 Minnesota 0-1
Illinois 10 Indiana 9
Ohio State 12 Notre Dame 8

"

LI

0

0~

m

Il

At the CAMPUS BOOTERY

FOR RELAXATION...
try leisure reading!

ANNUAL COLLEGE-END

Si

L MEN'S and.
WOMEN'S

S1

0O

S

The Cardinal-by Henry Robinson $1.00 paper
or $3.00 cloth
Don Gaucho-by Alyce Pollock $3.00
The Sea Eagles-by John Jennings $3.00
The Plymouth Adventure-by Ernest Gebler $3.00
The Wall-by John Hersey $4.00
The Feast-by Margaret Kennedy $3.00
Star Money-by Kathleen Winsor $3.00
Wait For Tomorrow-by Robert Wilder $3.50

This will be a real sale

- We must greatly reduce our

$30,000.00 STOCK OF FINE SHOES
Before thousands of students - teachers and others leave Ann Arbor
for the summer vacation. All new shoes just received INCLUDED
IN THIS OUR GREATEST SALE IN MANY YEARS,

FOR MEN

10% - 15% to 25% off
New Styles by Bostonian - Weyenburg -
Plymouth - Pine Tree - Saco-moc and some

FOR WOMEN
15% - 25% to 50% off
Newest styles - over 1500 pairs by Flor-
sheim - Footrest - Jolene - Enna Jettick -
Lucv Stride

/
t,
1
i

U

11

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