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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 13, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ROADWAY STARS HERE:
'The Tempest' To Open
Drama Season Monday

"The Tempest," starring Vera
orina and Arnold Moss will open
is year'sAnn Arbor Drama Sea-
m at 8:30 p.m. Monday night
the Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
e.
Both recognized Shakespearean
etors, Zorina and Moss, played
e parts of Ariel and Prospero
l the 1945 Margaret Webster
roduction in New York and on
ur.
[olanthe' Will
-ontrnue Run
The Peers and the Peri will con-
nue to battle it out in the second
erformance of "Iolanthe" at 8
m. tonight.
The popular operetta, produced
y the University's Gilbert and
ullivan Society, will close its Ann
rbor run with a special Mother's
ay Matinee at 3 p.m. tomorrow
i Pattengill Auditorium.
* * *
TICKETS FOR both perform-
aces will be on sale today at the
dministration Bldg. There are
ood seats left for 'both perform-
aces, according to Nancy Bylan,
1, treasurer for the group.
The remaining tickets will be
sold at the box office before the
performances.
Tickets for the May 20 produc-
on at Detroit's Rackham may
Lso be secured at the Adminis-
ation Bldg.

ZORINA MADE HER initial
stage appearance in Germany in
"A Midsummer Night's Dream."
She became a hit in "On Your
Toes" and later played on Broad-
way in "I Married An Angel."
Moss has been most recently
seen in "Twelfth Night" the
same production that had its
premiere in Ann Arbor last
spring. He has appeared in
"The Fifth Column" and "Front
Page" and such films as "Loves
of Carmen" and "Border In-
cident."
John Alexander who has play-
ed innumerable Shakespearean
roles, will take the part of Cali-
ban. Joseph Macaulay, often call-
ed "the man of a thousand faces"
for the variety of roles he has
played, will appear as Gonzago.
* * *
WALLACE ACTON will play
Trinculo, and Truman Smith and
Jon Dawson who played in last
season's "Twelfth Night" will ap-
pear in "The Tempest."
The acting and dancing tal-
ent of students in the depart-
ment of speech will be em-
ployed in the play which con-
cerns a strange island, a ban-
ished duke, magic and ship-
wrecks.
Juana da Laban, professor of
modern. dance will supervise the
dance sequences with music for
the performances by the Univer-
sity Little Symphony.
Season tickets for the series will
be on sale until May 20 at the Ly-
dia Mendelssohn box office.

Students -Will
Grade Faculty
May 25, 26
Students of the Literary College
wil have an opportunity to ex-
press their opinions on the quality
of the teaching staff when the.
second faculty evaluation, pro-
gram is held May 25-26.
The form to be used this year
will be an amended version of
the one used in the evaluationf
conducted late in the fall semester
of 1948.
* * *
EVALUATIONS will be madel
during the last, 30 minutes of class
periods. Ratings will be anony-
mous and instructors will leave
the class room after monitors have
been appointed to distribute and.
collect the forms.
The purpose of the evaluation
program is primarily to improve
teaching, Dean Hayward Kenis-
ton of the Literary College said
yesterday.
"For that reason the validity
of the study depends on the ser-
iousness with which students in-
dependently answer the ques-
tions."
* * *
INDIVIDUAL COMMENTS, fa-
vorable and unfavorable, which
were made by students in 1948
have proved especially valuable to
members of the staff and to ad-
ministrative officers, Dean Kenis-,
ton commented.
The Student Legislature will
cooperate with the Dean's office
in collecting the 50,000 forms to
be used.

92ND ANNUAL CONCERT:
Men's Glee Club To Give
Varied Vocal Program

With a musical program rang-
ing from long hair to brush cut,
the Michigan Men's Glee Club
wil -give their ninety-second an-
nual concert at 8:30 p.m. tonight
in Hill Auditorium.
The program will start with the
traditional opening hymn "Laudes
Atque Carmina" and will follow
Glider Club
Wanted: students interested i'n
soaring.
That's the .call being issued by
Richard Schulze, '51E, this week
for the newly-formed soaring club
which will hold an organizational
meeting at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in
Rm 1042 of the East Engineering
Building.
The membership is made up
mainly of students with previous
flying or soaring experience but
there are openings for a few mem-
bers who have no previous exper-
ience, Schulze said.

Edcos

with "Music Will Calm Thee" byI
Handel.
THROUGHOUT the program
works of such composers as Han-
del and Schubert will be balanced
by numbers by Porter, Sullivan.
and Gershwin.
Comic relief will be provided
during the concert by novelty
pieces sung in traditional bar-
ber shop style by the club's
quartet, the Novelaires.
Concluding the program will be
a melange of Michigan melodies
including old favorites and many
that are not commonly heard on
campus.
* * *
THE GLEE CLUB, one of the
oldest groups of its type in the
country, was founded in 1859,
and has become a school tradition
down through the years.
At present it is under the di-
rection of Prof. Philip A. Duey of
the School of Music, who also ar-
ranges many of the numbers for
the group.

V ill

Hold Meeting
Here Today
300 high school and college ed-
ucators will hold a one-day con-
ference on high school vocational
education here today.
The speakers at the opening
meeting, held, at 10 a.m. in Rack-
ham Amphitheatre, will be Rob-
ert Havighurst, of the University
of Chicago Committee on Human
Development; and high school
principals William Cornog, from
Philadelphia, Pa., and Earl E.
Sifert, from Maywood, Ill.
* * *
THE CONFERENCE will break
up into three groups at 11 a.m.
for discussions of the extent to
which a high school is responsible
for preparing students for speci-
fic occupations.
General chairman of the meet-
ing, which is being co-sponsored
by six state educational organi-
zations, is Ralph C. Weinrich,
associate state superintendent of
public instruction in charge of
vocational education.

-Daily-Wally Barth
IN THE NEWS-Reporter Dave Pollock and University Relations
Counselor Arthur L. Brandon, check over a recent reprint of an
article sent out by the University News Service in their daily
coverage of campus events.
4 * * *
Nvew s Service Reports
Campus Events to orld
1 4

A

By LEONARD GREENBAUM
Reporting the events of a col-
lege metropolis of 20,000 students
to the outside world comprises a
full time job for the University
Nexs Service, the official voice of
the University.
Located on the third floor of the
Administration Bldg., it is a part
of the University Information Ser-
vice, which also handles public
relations, publicity booklets and
the campus information desk.

i
I

THE NEWS
origin in 1897

SERVICE had its
when a four page

I

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MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)

'11

Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Earl Grandstaff, Acting Minister
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
10:50 AM.: Morning Worship (This service is
broadcast over WHRV). Nursery for children
during the service.
GUILD HOUSE: 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Minister to Students
Jean Garee, Associate
STUDENT GUILD: 6:00 supper at the 'Congre-
gational Church. Judge Jay H. Payne, who
presides over the Juvenile Court of our county
will speak on "A Judge Looks At The Ameri-
can Home."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday morning Services. Subject,
May 14-Mortals and Immortals
9:30 A. M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Services.
A free reading room is maintained at 211 East
Washington Street where the Bible and all
authorized Christian Science literature may be
read, borrowed, or purchased.
This room is open daily,5except Sundays and
holidays, from 11:30 to 5 P.M.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Av.
W. P. Lemon and W. H. Henderson, Ministers
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
Mildred Beam, Church School Director
9:00 A.M.: Westminster Guild Seminar in
Religion.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon by Dr.
W. P. Lemon. Topic: "God's Constant."
Mother's Day Service.
5:30 P.M.: Guild Supper.
6:30 P.M.: "A Talent for Living." Dramatic
Production.
Our morning service is being broadcast over
WPAG at 11:05.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
Theodore R. Schmale, D.D.,
Walter S. Press, Ministers
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
423 South Fourth Ave.
9:30 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon by Rev.
Press, "Religion in the Home."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild at the Congregational
Church, State and William Sts. Judge Jay H.
Payne will speak on the subject "A Judge,
Looks at the American Home."
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
No. Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast, Canterbury House).
9:45 A.M.: Church School, thru Grades 7, 8, 9.
11:00 A.M.: Church School, thru Grade 6.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rev.
Henry Lewis, S.T.D.
12:15 P.M.: After-Service Fellowship.
5:30 P.M.: Canterbury Club Picnic Supper and

VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
(Interdenominational)
University. Community Center
Willow Run Village
Rev. J. Edgar Edwards, Chaplain
John R. Hertzberg, Director of Sacred Music
10:45 A.M.: Divine Worship. Sermon: "Toward
Understanding Parenthood." Anthems: "To
God on High" Decius; "Now Thank We All
Our* God" C ruger.
10:45 A.M.: Church School and Nursery.
4:30 P.M.: Study and Discussion Group. Topic:
"Jesus' Teaching Regarding The Conduct of a
Christian." Leader: Mrs. Carl Swanberg.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D.
Student Directors-H. L. Pickerill; Jean Garee
Music-Wayne Dunlap; J. Bertram Strickland
9:30 A.M.: Intermediate Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Nursery, Kindergartn and Primary
Departments.
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship. Dr. Parr will preach
on "Incessant Affirmatives."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild. Supper in this church.
Judge Jay H. Payne will speak on "A Judge
Looks at the American Home."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue-Phone 2-0085
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Adult Study Group. "The Political
Situatio nin China,"bMrs. Angus Campbell
and Mrs. Clyde Coombs.
11:00 A.B.: Service of Worship: "Loving and
Being Loved" by Rev. Edward H. Redman.
There will be no meeting of the Unitarian Student
Group.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue-Phone 5560
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Rev. Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
9:30 A.M.: Bible Study "The Means of Grace."
10:30 A.M.: Service, with Holy Communion. Ser-
mon by the pastor, "A Doer That Acts."
5:30 P.M.: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program, with talk on "The
Significance of the Common Service Liturgy."
9:15 P.M. Tuesday: Social Hour.
9:00 P.M. Thursday: Ascension Day Candlelight
Vesper Service, with sermon by the pastor,
"Mission Completed."
8:30 P.M. Friday: Social Evening at The Center.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student
Counsellor
Roger Williams Guild, 502 East Huron
10:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Worship. Sermon, "Objectified
Ideals," by Rev. Loucks.

Album of '
Events on Sale
Featuring excerpts of student
activities from the Phillips-Slos-
son debate to the Danny Kaye
show, the Wolverine Club's "List-
en and Remember" album is being
sold on the Diagonal from 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m.
The album includes highlights
of the Union Opera, Varsity
Night, University football games,
Senior Night, Varsity Night, Stu-
dent Legislature election returns,
J-Hop bands and pep rallies.
STUDENTS WHO have not had
the opportunity to hear the al-
bum may hear two of the three
records at record shops on North
University and South University.
The albums will be distribut-
ed from May 22 to the end of
the semester.
The advance price is $6.50 and
a down payment of $3.25 must be
made to reserve an album. Publi-
city Chairman Alan Hartzmark
advised students to purchase their
albums early, as there may be a
price increase near the end of
the semester.
Union Ponders
Constitution
(Continued from Page 1)
dates, and these four would be re-
quired to have previous experience
at the Union.
* * *'
THE PROPOSED change will be
decided upon at a mass meeting
of Union members Tuesday night.
Another change which will be
up for approval Tuesday involves
the process of amending the Con-
stitution. This was a constant
source of irritation back in the
twenties, when a number of
amending attempts collapsed for
lack of a quorum at constitutional
meetings.
But Union men managed to
get around this trouble through
several slick devises.
In 1930, when the present sys-
tem of choosing senior officers
went through, polls were kept op-
en all day, enabling Union mem-
bers to vote the change into the
constitution by a solid 1156 to 18
majority.
Another time 3,000 students
voted on an amendment. This
feat was accomplished by sub-
mitting the proposal at an Ohio
State pep rally.
WHAT
TWIN VICES:
ARE RAMPANT ON YOUR
CAMPUS?
You'll split your sides laughing at the .I

newsletter was issued bi-weekly
at the request of the Board of Re-
gents.
Today, complete daily cover-
age is given to all campus events
through a staff of four report-
ers, two secretaries, a photo-
grapher, and several part-time
student workers.
Newsworthy stories that orig-
inate on campus are mimeo-
graphed in lots ranging from 55
to 450 depending on the range of
interest of the particular item.
EACH DAY relevent items are
sent to the news services, the Ann
Arbor News, the New York Times,
the New York Herald Tribune,
Newsweek, Time, The Daily, and
Detroit correspondents.
Once a week significant time
stories are mailed to every news-
paper and radio station in Mich-
igan, while specialty news such
as science stories, are sent to
magazines and free lance writers
who handle such material.
Picture mats for distribution
throughout the country are made
approximately once a month from
photographs taken on campus
that are of more than momentary
interest.
* * *

THE EFFECTS of this wide-
spread program was recently re-
vealed when a study of published
news items showed that a large
proportion of the material print-
ed about the University had come
from News Service sources.
PRESS LUNCHEONS and spe-
cial press conferences are fre-
quent activities when a big story
breaks for publication.
The biggest story that the
News Service has handled, ac-
cording to its editor, Clelan B.
Wyllie, was the recent $3,060,-
000 Kresge Foundation Gift.
An important story, it served
to emphasize the biggest head-
ache of the News Service-the
problem of release dates.
Since the Kresge story was con-
sidered a topic of general interest
outside of the University, it was
given an afternoon release date
that would make it availableas
front page headline news to the
52 evening papers in the state
rather than to the three morning
papers.
A Detroit paper, however, jump-
ed the release date, spread the
story over its front page in the
morning and made it relatively
dead for the late evening editions.

K4
PROF. GULPNECK
Speech
PROF. CROCKOLEAD
Mechanical Drawing

Yes, these Professors have bought their
1950 INSEAM.

-j. .
I

wf91?

j

PROF. PULLNGUTS
Zoology

I

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A "

R

PROF. ZIGZIG
Romance Language

and we love them all!!

1.1

SPECIAL SHO

this week at the CAMPUS BOOTERY

FOR MEN

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CHURCH OF CHRIST
210 N. Fourth Ave.
Y.M.C.A. Auditorium
Telephone Number: 2-6007
A.M.: "Faith and Works."
P.M.: "Our Responsibility."
Guest onakr-I_. L YpnIm,

FOR WOMEN

595

795

995

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