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May 10, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

a

WEDNESDAY, MAY 10, 1950

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} RELIEF IN SIGHT:
Shortage of Elementary
Teachers Still Increasing

By BOB VAUGHN

I

The elementary teacher shortage
ntinues to increase with no re-
edy in sight; according to statis-
s recently released by T. Luther
irdom, director of the University
ireau of Appointments and Oc-
pational Information'.
I n Michigan approximately
00 students are being trained
r elementary teaching. Only 700
wever, are expected to enter the
aching field. The estimated
ortage will be around 2,000.
LAST YEAR over 6,000 emer-
ncy certificates were issued in
e state. This year 5,000 such cer-
icates have been issued.
Purdom pointed out that sta-
stics indicate that the elemen-
iry shortage will last from sev-
a to nine years. In approxi-
iately 10 years a greater de-
and for secondary teachers
hould develop, he said.
While the demand for elemen-
y teachers continues to grow
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there is a surplusiofasecondary
school teachers, especially in the,
fields of physical education and
the social sciences.
* * *
AT THE PRESENT time there
are about 3,000 secondary school
teachers in training. Of this num-
ber only about 70 per cent will
teach. But there is only a demand
for approximately 1600 teachers on
this level so a surplus of 500 teach-
ers will exist.
Results of a poll of high school
seniors in the state indicate that
only 6 percent will enter the
teaching field.
* * *
APPROXIMATELY 500 students
are taking teaching certificates at
the University's education school.
In addition a considerable num-
ber of people with Masters degrees
are completing courses in educa-
tion in order to qualify for certi-
ficates.
The situation isn't any better
on the national level. According
to figures released by the Na-
tional Commission on Teacher
Education and Professional
Standards, the nation will need
a minimum of 100,000 elemen-
tary school teachers every year
for the next ten years.
Yet only 22,460 June college
graduates will become elementary
school teachers.
At the present rate of teacher
training only 200,000 will be avail-
able during the next decade.
This will leave a gap of 800,000
to be filled partially by incompe-
tent personnel.

An Education in
Summer Suit
Luxury

Jobs Scarce
For Spring
-Graduhates
The nation's graduating class of
1950 will face greater competition
for jobs than any class for many
years, according to "Labor Market
Today" a monthly summary of oc-
cupational and industrial trends.
More than half of the one mil-
lion school graduates who will
flood the labor market in June
will be from college. Unemploy-
ment, it is estimated, will surpass
the 5,000,000 mark at that time.
* * *
G. I. STUDENTS completing
their college training will comprise
about 80 percent of male college
graduates this year.
Competition for jobs will be
especially keen in the fields of
business administration and en-
gineering.
It is estimated that only half
of this year's 50,000, engineering
graduates will find jobs available.
The others will have to take jobs
not closely related to their field of
concentration.
THE EXPECTED 65,000 busi-
ness administration graduates will
be faced with the same problem
confronting the engineers. They
will however, find placment com-
paratively easy if they enter the
sales field.
Geographically, employment is
highest in Texas where unem-
ployment is less than two per
cent.
In addition, there is relatively
low unemployment in New Mex-
ico, Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska,
Wyoming, South Dakota, North
Dakota, Minnesota and Iowa. In
these states the unemployment
rate is less than four percent.
* * *
EMPLOYMENT prospects are
poor in most of New England, Mi-
chigan's Upper Peninsula and in
all of the Pacific Coast states.
"Job Market Today" figures in-
dicate that employment prospects
in the Federal Government will be
very limited. Preference is afford-
ed to veterans, the publication
states.
The'number of government em-
ployed veterans increased from 14
percent in 1944 to 53 percent in
1949."
Prof essors'
Biolinguisties
Book on Sale
After thirty years of research,
compilation and delay the Hand-
book of Biolinguistics by Profs.
Clarence L. Meader and John H.
Muyskens of the speech depart-
ment was jointly released for pub-
lic sale yesterday in England and
the United States.
Recently recognized as a new
science by Dr. Leon H. Strong,
chairman of the department of
anatomy at the University of Chi-
cago Medical School, Biolinguistics
was originated and developed
through the work of the two Uni-
versity professors and their gradu-
ate students.
Biolinguistis covers the bio-
logical aspects of voice and
speech development.
Besides the work of the authors

it includes reports by more than
thirty graduate students that have
never before been printed.
Ready for publication by a Lon-
don publishing firm in 1939, the
book was delayed by the outbreak
of World War II. During the Lon-
don bomb blitz the publishing
house was completely demolished
thus adding further delay.

GUTTED CITY-Smoke rises from buildings still standing (back-
ground) in Rimouski, Quebec, during the wind-whipped fire that
left more than 2,000 homeless. The fire started in a lumber yard
and burned for 32 hours. Damage was estimated at $20,000,000.
INDIAN CULTURE:
'U' Archaeologfists Race
Against Industrialization
(, *).

Atom Talk
Emphasizes'
U.S. Actiont
Opening the 18th annual Adult
Education Institute John A. Per-
kins, assistant provost of the Uni-
versity, declared yesterday that the
United States must "carry the
ball" in future atomic energy re-
search.
"THE PROBLEMS of atomic en-
ergy can. not all be studied by
physical scientists or in the lab-
oratories of the natural scientists,"
Perkins said, referring to the so-
cial side of the problem in which
political and legal questions will
arise.
Perkins also declared that it is
appropriate that a research center
such as the University should un-
dertake the Michigan Memorial-
Phoenix Project.
Prof. Arthur W. Bromage, of
the political science department,
and an alderman on the Ann
Arbor city council, said that
"The idea that women should
serve on the school board, but
not on the city council, is
wrong."
Reasons he gave for this state-
ment were that women have a tre-
mendous interest in public health
administration, safety of school
children, handling of juvenile de-
linquents and recreational facili-
ties.
DR. ISADORE LAMPE, profes-
sor of roentgenology, speaking on
cancer, told the Institute audience
that cancer is a complex of many
diseases, rather than one single
disease. Lampe also said that
"there is no satisfactory cancer
detection test today."
However, he urged the public to
be neither over-optimistic nor dis-
couragd about the progress being
made on cancer, for the advance-
nIents made in the past 50 years,
he said, have been quite remark-
able.
11

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The University chapter of Sigma
Rho Tau, national engineering
speech society, has been awarded
a prize for being the most active
chapter during the past year.
The award is presented annual-
ly to the branch which wins the
most debates and participates ex-
tensively in other speech activities.
The presentation took place

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University archaeologists will
begin a race with time this sum-
mer as they begin a five-year pro-
gram to unearth data on a 5,000-
year Indian occupation of the
Central Mississippi Valley.
The reason for all the haste is
that within a few years this farm
area will be industrialized, and all
evidence of past cultures lost, ar-
* * *
IN LAUNCHING the program,
the group headed by Dr. J. B.
Griffin, of the Museum of Anthro-
pology, and Albert C. Spaulding,
Associate Curator of Archaeology,
will work principally in strategic
areas near St. Louis.
Because of its geographical
location and unusually fertile
soil, this area was one of the
major centers of American In-
dian culture around 1,000 A.D.,
Dr. Griffin said.
The group will use three neth-
ods of gathering the data, accord-
ing to Dr. Griffin: information
Heart Disease
Control Seen
"The sweep of heart disease re-
search is so promising that stud-
ies of gn eral old age body
changes may eventually replace
research about specific heart di-
seases," Dr. J. C. VanSlyke, direc-
tor of the National Heart Insti-'
tute, said yesterday.
Speaking at a two-day cancer
and heart disease training pro-
gram sponsored by the public
health school for public health
officers, Dr. VanSlyke predicted
eventual control of the three most
common causes of heart trouble.
They are high blood pressure,
hardening of the arteries and
rheumatic fever, Dr. VanSlyke
said.
DR. VANSLYKE described the
year-old, federally supported Na-
tional Heart Institute as "a broad-
ly conceived, well-balanced pro-
gram of research, training and
control activities" in cardiac
problems.
Earlier in the training pro-
gram, which ended yesterday,
the public health officers agreed
that cancer may cease to be a
major scourge in the future,
even if no specific cure for it is
found.
Michigan Health Commissioner
Albert E. Heustis said that from
20 to 25 per cent of treated can-
cers are cured.
"If we could apply all the in-
formation that we now possess,
from 40 to 50 per cent more could
be cured," Dr. Heustis added.
Collings To Speak
Prominent industrialists will
speak at a meeting of the Student
Affiliate of the American Chemi-
cal Society, 7 p.m. today in Rm.
1400 Chemistry Bldg.
Featured will be W. R.Collings,
noted industrialist, who will
speak on "What the Graduate
Chemist and Chemical Engineer
can Expect in Industry and What
the Industry Expects of Them."
Read Daily Classifieds
PORTRAITS
Y ~ and "

from private collectors, utilization
of easily available surface mater-
ial, and excavations.
* * *
THE EXCAVATIONS will be
limited to only those areas which
promise evidence of culture
changes through time, he said.
One of the theories which the
study will test is the idea that
the cultural level at different
time periods has influenced the
type of area occupied.
Another aim is to determine
the manner in which cultural
ideas which came from Mexico
about 1,000 A.D. were adopted by
local groups.
Comic opera
!latinee To Be
Given Sunday
A special Mother's Day matinee
for Iolanthe, the Spring produc-
tion of the Gilbert and Sullivan
Society, has been scheduled for 3
p.m. Sunday, according to Richard
Webber, society president.
"Iolanthe will be an example of
student dramatics at its best,"
Webber said, "and should be a
welcome treat for visiting mo-
thers."
* * *
TICKET SALES for this mati-
nee are being held from 10 a.m. to
4:30 p.m., at the first window in
the Administration Bldg. at 90
cents and $1.20. Tickets for the
Friday and Saturday night shows
are also on sale.
This comic operetta, in the
best of Gilbert and Sullivan tra-
dition, is based on the endeav-
ors of a band of Arcadian fairies
to upset the equilibrium of the
English House of Peers by get-
ting the son of one of their
members into the House.
One of the most popular of, Gil-
bert and Sullivan dramas, Iolan-
the lampoons the traditions of
English Peerage, and has been
a m u s i n g American audiences
throughout the present century.
The weekend production by the
Gilbert and Sullivan Society marks
the sixth of their operatic en-
deavors.
Yoga Discussion
A meeting of the Theosophical
Society will be held at 8 p.m. today
in the Michigan League, at which
time Professor Ernest Wood from
India will speak on "The Yogas
of Daily Life."

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I

Engineering Speech Society Awarded
Activities Prize at National Convention

at the Sigma Rho Tau national
convention which was held on
May 6 at the University of De-
troit
Carl Hansen won second place
in the project speech contest in
whicheeach contestant gave his so-
lution to an engineering problem.
Norm Steere took third place in
the impromptu speech contest.

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