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May 09, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

r HILL TOMORROW:
IFC Sing, 'U' Tradition, Began in 1935

Truman Leaves on Tour

By PETER THORPE
/lore than 3,500 students jam-
the steps of the General Li-
y and immediate vicinity last
t and sang traditional Michi-
songs; the occasion was the
all-campus sing."
his brief lead from the now
swing pages of the May 9, 1935,
y marked the birth of a new
higan tradition, the Interfra-
ity Council Sing. The 1950

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Sing will be held at 7:30 p.m. to-
morrow in Hill Auditorium.
* * *
SPONSORED the first year by
IFC, the ROTC band and the Var-
sity Glee Club, the "enthusiastic
student reception" of the event
roused the 'fraternity committee-
men to establish the sing per-
manently.
Approximately 2,000 persons
gathered in front of the General
Library the following year to
watch Theta Delta Chi win the
first of many trophies awarded
by local merchants.
In 1937, 40 iron-lunged sons of
Acacia volleyed and thundered
their way through "Here's to Aca-
cia" to annex the first place crown
in the second annual IFC Sing.
* * *
A PUBLIC ADDRESS system,
bleachers in front of the General
Library, soroity sponsors and a
crowd of 3,500 cheering spectators
marked the progress of the sing
in 1938. The Beta Theta Pi "Lov-
ing Cup" took first place honors
that night.
Four years after its incep-
tion, the sing attracted 33 mel-
ody-minded fraternities to the
first preliminary judgings. Six-
teen houses and three howling
canine mascots emerged to com-
pete before 3,000 students with
Alpha Sigma Phi placing first
by a unanimous decision.
In 1940, the Theta Xi's sang
their way to victory with "Theta
Xi Medley" and, in the last year
before World War II, the judges
rewarded Kappa Sigma's rendi-
tion of "All Through the Night"
with top honors.
ALONG WITH many other

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Michigan traditions, the. IFC
Sing was revived in 1946. Sigma
Phi Epsilon that year, Phi Delta
Theta in 1947, and Sigma Alpha
Epsilon the following year all war-
bled their way to fame and first
place trophies in the annual song-
fests.
Held in Hill Auditorium for
the first time last year, the
event was fully recorded and
photographed. Lambda Chi Al-
pha, singing "Mah Lindy Lou,"
placed first among 11 competing
fraternities.
Newest innovation for the song-
fest was recently announced by
George Cherpelis, 1950 IFC Sing
committee chairman. WUOM plans
to include a broadcast of the
event at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow. Ten
fraternities will be competing then
for three trophies.
* * *
Greek Week,
Begins Today
The first post war all-campus
Fraternity Week will get off to
a fast start at a kickoff meeting
at 8:15 p.m. today in Rackham
Lecture Hall.
Scheduled for the initial event
of fthe revived campus tradition
are three speeches, choral enter-
tainment and a possible question-
and-answer period.
DEAN RAY WAUNOCK, of
Pennsylvania State College, vice-
chairman of the National Inter-
fraternity Council, will deliver an
address on "Fraternities in Our
Democracy."
Dean Audrey Wilder, of Al-
bion College, will speak on "Re-
lationship of Affiliated Groups
to the Administration and Al-
umni."
The third topic, "Problems of
Sororities," will be discussed by
Mrs. Russel Strickland, chairman
of the Delta Gamma project com-
mittee.

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TRUMAN TAKES OFF ON STUMP TOUR-President Truman, Mrs. Truman and daughter Mar-
garet wave from the platform of their train as it pulled out of Washington's Union Station for a 16-
state tour across the northern part of the nation. (See story on page 1.)

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PHYSICIAN REPORTS:
Cold Weather Called Cause
Of LowWinter Polio Rate

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P. DUTTON & CO., Inc.

Stimulation of mucous by cold
weather may explain why there is
more infantile paralysis in sum-
mer than in winter, Dr. Charles
Armstrong, of the National Insti-
tut of Health in Washington, D.C.,
reported yesterday.
Speaking at a two-day cancer
and heart disease training pro-
gram sponsored by the public
health school, Dr. Armstrong ex-
plained that mucous serves two
functions in the prevention of
polio.
* * *
FIRST, the mucous contains
anti-bodies which fight the di-
sease, Dr. Armstrong said.
"Experiments made with rats
prove that the mucous tends to

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protect the individual from the
polio virus," he said.
Th second reason mucous aids
in polio prevention is that it helps
prevent the virus from entering a
body cell and developing there, Dr.
Armstrong explained.
* * *
DR. ARMSTRONG'S talk was
the annual Don W. Gudakunst
memorial lecture.
Speaking at a public health of-
ficers' banquet last night, Dr.
Lester Breslow, director of the
California chronic disease service,
reported that a study of the to-
bacco-smoking history of lung-
cancer patients is being made by
his state.
WUOM Wins
First Place In
Radio Contest
WUOM has won first place for
teen-age programs, in the 14th
American Exhibition of Educa-
tional Radio Programs, script di-
rector William Bender, jr., an-
nounced yesterday.
The University radio station won
the award "in recognition of out-
standing educational value and
distinguished radio production for
its program "Treasures Off the
Shelf." The program consisted of
a series of 13 broadcasts based on
early American history.
The series has been rebroadcast
over more than 30 radio stations,
Bender said. The award was pre-
sented by the institute for Educa-
tion by Radio at Ohio State Uni-
versity.
* * *
Will Present
ScriptToday
A Ranald MacDougall radio
script, "Ineffable Essence of No-
thing," will be presented by the
Angell Hall Players at 8 p.m. to-
day over Station WHRV.
An original production of the
NBC Radio Guild, the script is
being produced by the speech de-
partment with special permission.
MacDougall has been ranked
with radio authors such as Arch
Obler and Norman Corwin. His
script is a light fantasy dealing
with a man's imagination, dreams,
chances of becoming a murderer
and his meeting with a certain
Mr. Mu.
The production will be directed
by Merrill McClatchey with Pres
Holmes, '50, -as announcer. The
cast includes Nafe Katter, Don
Hall, Jack Beauchamp, Warren
Pickett and Betty Lou 'Robinson.

Adult Institute
Starts .Annual
SeriesToday
Medicine, international rela-
tions, living in the later years,
modern science and fine arts will
be discussed at the 18th annual
Adult Education Institute, which
will begin today and run through
Thursday.
Five series of lectures are plan-
ned for the three-day program
sponsored by the University Ex-
tension Service and the Michigan
Federation of Women's Clubs-
* * *
AMONG THE speakers who will
address an expected 1,000 Michi-
gan club women will be Patricia
Rabinovitz, of the Wayne County
Bureau of Social Aid, Elizabeth
Breckinridge, of the Welfare
Council of Metropolitan Chicago,
Prof. Harold Dorr, Prof. Lawrence
Preuss and Prof. Arthur Bromage,
all of the political science depart-
ment.

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