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May 06, 1950 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-06

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AN~ ~DAItY

'Ignorance Poll'

ACCORDING to, a recent Daily poll, a
surprising number of University students
are completely ignorant of the facts and
personalities which comprise the major part
of our national news.
The poll showed that more than half
of the students contacted didn't know
what the Kerr Bill was, and more than a
third were ignorant of who Senator Mc-
Carthy and Louis Budenz were and why
they were making top national news.
When University students graduate they
are expected to become active,- informed
citizens, mainly because they have had col-
Editorials published in The Michigan Daily
are written by members of The Daily staff
and represent the views of the writers only.
NIGHT EDITOR: VERNON EMERSON

lege training, Four more years of schooling
should mean four more years of active con-
sideration of the problems inherent in a
democratic society.
Students should learn to be 'social ani-
mals' along with their training for a parti-
cular job.
Their preparation for the 'cold, outside
world' iiust include training for citizen-
ship. This can't be gained from the theories
which are spouted in lectures, but only
,from individual consideration of the latest
news, supplemented and thoroughly hash-
ed over in bull sessions.
No student can have a legitimate excuse
not to keep up with the news.
If, as the so-called Ignorance Poll would
indicate, Michiganders are failing in this
respect, it's time for them to knuckle down
and fulfill their responsibilities as college
students.
-Rosemary Owen

THOMAS L. STOKES:

Sen. Pepper's Defeat

W ASHINGTON-Perhaps the major im-
mediate effect nationally of Senator
Claude Pepper's defeat in the Florida Demo-
cratic primary will be to open up hitherto
buttoned-up big Republican checkbooks for
contributions to the Republican Congres-
sional campaign.
Because Senator Pepper had come to be
such a symbol of New Dealism and Fair
Dealism, his unseating is the best news
that Republicans have had since they read
the returns of the 1946 elections when
they recaptured Congress for a brief two-
year interval in a long dry spell.
It was not surprising, therefore, that Re-
publican National Chairman Guy George
Gabrielson was the first to speak up, and
before the returns were all in. He chirped
up just as gleefully as if a real Republican
had won a major victory, instead of a Dem-
ocrat who, however, attacked enough of the
Truman program to qualify among Republi-
[CJINJEFMA'
At The Orpheum...
THE YEARLING, with Claude Jarman Jr.,
Gregory Peck, and Jane Wyman.
"The Yearling" represents a slightly above
average Hollywood attempt to out-do itself
while suffering under a poor script.
To the casual observer, it would seem
that the producer, faced with the problem
of creating a fine motion picture, gives only
passing thought to the backbone of hi
masterpiece, depending on the glories of
Technicolor and the artistry of his tech-
nicians to wire up the cracked vertebrae
into a coherent work of art.
As it turns out though, the wire is the
only fit part of this movie.
To be sure, when it came to adapting
the Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Pulitzer
Prize-winning novel into a motion pic-
ture, the producer already had one strike
against him. He had to depend on a child
star to play Jody, the little boy who lived
in backwoods Florida and wanted a pet.
Claude Jarman, Jr., manages quite well,
a difficult part, but in comparison with some
of the current child stars, such as Bobby
Henry who starred in The Fallen Idol, his
performance is far from extraordinary.
Although Gregory Peck and Jane Wy-
man, as Penny Baxter and wife, Jody's
paw and maw, try hard, they are severely
handicapped by the taciturn hill-billy-ish
script inflicted upon them.
On the lighter side, the technical quality
achieved makes up in sheer optical enjoy-
ment for any weak parts in the script. Two
scenes alone would justify seeing this movie.
The first, a bear hunt, is carried off with
some of the most exciting photographic
work we have ever seen.
The second, the flight of a group of deer
through a thick forest, is marked by the
same excellent photography coupled with
an arrangement of the theme from the
scherzo of Mendelssohn's Midsummer Night's
Dream.
-Peter Holmes

cans as a happy symbol. Rep. George Smath-
ers, the victor, had support from Florida Re-
publicans, of whom there are a good many,
as well as powerful financial interests which
are Republican, politically.j
* * *
ANOTHER EFFECT of the Pepper defeat
also-and likewise a major one-is ex-
pected to be increased emphasis on what is
known as the "Red issue," which was ex-
ploited against Senator Pepper by Rep.
Smathers. The latter accused his opponent
of sympathy with Russia and Communist
causes. Chairman Gabrielson, himself, has
been using it loosely and recklessly in recent
speeches with charges of Communists in
the Truman Administration, naming no one,
of course. He, unlike Senator -Joseph Mc-
Carthy (R., Wis.), has no Congressional im-
munity.
Rep. Smathers' success offers Repub-
licans a sample and a text, for which
Senator McCarthy already is providing
a national sounding board and seemingly
has stirred up a national issue, as least
temporarily.
In the smoke screen of confusion that is
being raised the progressive political forces
of the nation will unquestionably find them-
selves on the defensive more than at any
time in recent years. That is apparent now.
It will be President Truman's endeavor to
clarify the atmosphere on behalf of his
party on his forthcoming cross-country
"whistle-stop" tour. He faces a real test and
knows it, even though he starts out with the
title of "the cleverest politician ever to oc-
cupy the White House," awarded by Harold
Stassen, who called him at the same time
"the worst President."
While Republicans eagerly pounced upon
the Pepper defeat as the beginning of a
trend, it is early to draw too broad infer-
ences from a conservative victory in the
usually conservative South in which, it
may be recalled, President Truman lost
four states in 1948, though these did not
include Florida.
The result is being hailed as a defeat for
President Truman's labor allies. It was that,
though the degree of the defeat may be
exaggerated. While both CIO and AFL work-
ed hard for Senator Pepper, the CIO is
numerically and vote-wise very weak in
Florida- The AFL is stronger. Both count
for more in other sections of the country,
and their leaders are using the Florida set-
back to whip them up to renewed efforts,
realizing the psychological effect of a re-
verse so dramatically advertised at the start
of a campaign.
*~ * *
THE REAL background of the Congres-
sional campaign will be in the Middle
West which, though for so long normally
Republican territory, was where Democrats
clinched the Presidency and strengthened
themselves in Congress in 1948. President
Truman recognized that in his itinerary
for his tour.
If the Florida primary denoted a reaction
against the labor policy of the Administra-
tion, which some are reading into it, that
might have a meaning in the farm states
where labor is a minority element and much
less influential than in populous urban cen-
ters, though stronger than in the South.

Movies
THAT The Daily movie reviewers take a
rather dismal view of nearly every motion
picture they write up is common knowledge
to any Daily reader. Indeed, after a while
one might begin to think that the editors
feed their reviewers unsweetened grapefruit
juice for breakfast, so tart and searing are
their comments.
It is also evident that for every pessi-
mistic review of a movie written, there
are 10 people ready to pounce upon the
critic for his unsparing analysis of the
particular movie. Many a movie shown in
Ann Arbor has been thoroughly raked over
the coals, first, by a Daily critic panning
it, and then by some letter-to-the editor
refuting these comments, and even prais-
ing the same movie.
However, this battle-of-the-critics is hard-
ly a worthwhile issue. It is not important
whether a movie is termed "excellent,"-
which they rarely are-or "lousy,"-which
they often are-by The Daily critics. What
may be a very good movie to one person may
be of no interest at all to another person.
In considering this matter, then, the
more pertinent issue would be to see what
can be done to bring better-quality movies
to Ann Arbor, rather than to continually
squabble over the relative worth of a
movie, good or bad.
If we are to accept the opinions of The
Daily reviewers, even in a modified form,
then it is certainly apparent that few really
"good" movies are shown in Ann Arbor
theatres. But wailing about the poor quality
of the ones that play here week after week
does little good if no change is effected.
Movie-goers must make known their desire
for more and better movies in order for a
change to occur.
It is, of course, less troublesome, and often-
times less expensive, for the movie-proprietor
to bill an average film, rather than one that
is widely acclaimed; hence the movie-house
operator with no public pressure at his back
can quite easily take a lackadaisical attitude
in choosing the pictures he runs.
This situation comes about when the
apathetic movie-goer-apathetic because
he does nothing to demand better movies-
places himself, unwittingly, under the
thumb of the movie-operator. Here we
have the same disinterest, or "let John
do it" attitude that is encountered bian-
nually in campus elections.
Unfortunately, the solution to this prob-
lem is not an easy one. There are quite
naturally many factors involved in bringing
better pictures to town; often it is difficult
for a movie-proprietor to get just the pic-
ture he would like to. But the point remains
that there is wide room for improvement.
Hence, with an abatement in the movie-
criticism war between Daily readers and
reviewers, supplanted by a more concerted
effort on the part of both to bring better
movies to Ann Arbor, we would perhaps be-
gin to find movies appearing on local screens
with which little fault could be found.
-Larry Rothman
R J\AMA
VOLPONE, by Ben Jonson and several
others. Presented by the University of
Michigan Theatre Guild. At the Pattengill
Auditorium.
THERE seems to be a case of misrepresen-
tation here. I'm not sure whose Volpone
this was, but it didn't have a great deal to
do with Ben Jonson. When last I looked,
Jonson's was a vicious and vituperative so-
cial satire. Last night's performance was
strictly for the big broad yuks. While I have
no particular quarrel with yuks qua yuks
(and there was an impressive number of

them), I regretted exceedingly the omission
of the point B.J. was trying to make in his
play.
The thing began with high egough pur-
pose. But along about midway there be-
came apparent a tendency to underline
the more obviously comic and to neglect
the essentially unpleasant commentary on
human behavior. Thus Harvey Stuart, as
Mosca, went from the scheming parasite
to a kind of merry andrew, and wound up
as a scruple-ridden Boy Scout. Len Ros-
enson's Volpone evolved downward from
a lower-case satan until he snivels ab-
jectly off the stage in the last act; and the
three legacy-hunters finish strongly as low
barition.
Rosenson was good. I remember him last
in the leading role in J. P. Sartre's "No
Exit," in which he was also good. As Vol-
pone he was wholeheartedly lecherous, pro-
perly conniving,-and thoroughly nasty: and
all of it in spite of this particular version of
the play.
Stuart's Mosca was considerably hamper-
ed by the last-act acquisition of a conscience.
Voltore, Corvino, and Corbaccio, rendered
from left to right by Bill Webb, Jack Laza-
rus, and Don Hawley were, again from left
to right, amusing, raucous, and horrorific.
Lazarus delivered his lines at times at such
a high decibel rating as to be incomprehen-
sible, and Hawley's gothic makeup deserved
in itself special commendation.
It is difficult to be a virtuous heroi.!'e
and emerge with any particular distinc-
tion. Laurel Roden demonstrated this fact
last night as Columba. (Celia to those who
haxi- rob ri the hnnkl _ Art R P neT. nnn

TIME OF CLASS

TIME OF EXAMINATION

SR 0NI , SIEMETh

..,., e,,,,,,;,,,;.. ..1.

Monday;
Monday;
Monday
Monday;
Monday;
Monday;
Monday
Tuesd ay
Tuesday
Tuesday;
Tuesday
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Tuesday
Tuesday,

at 8 ............................ .Fri.,
at 9.............................Mon.,.
at 10..............................Mon.
at 11 ................... .......Wed.,
at 1.............................Thurs.,
at 2........ .. .................Sat.,
at 3 ............................ .W ed.,
at 8 .............................Sat.,
at 9 .............................Tues.,
at 10............................Tues.,
at 11.............................Thurs.,
at 1 .............................Sat.,
at 2........ ................... .W ed.,
at 3.............. ................W ed.,

June
June
June
June
June
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June
June
June
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June
June

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EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
JUNE 3 to JUNE 15, 1950
NOTE: For courses having both lectures. and recitations, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week;
for courses having recitations only, the time of the class is the
time of the first' recitation period. Certain courses will be exam-
ined at special periods as noted below th'e regular schedule. 12
o'clock classes, 4 o'clock classes, 5 o'clock classes and other "irregu-
lar" classes may use any examination period provided there is no
conflict (or one with conflicts if the conflicts are larranged for
by the "irregular" class). A final examination on Jurie 15 is avail-
able for "irregular" classes which afe unable to utilize an earlier
period.4
Each student should receive notification from ;his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination. In the College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts, no date of examination may be
changed without the consent of the Corpmittee on Examinations.

Conflicts and Irregular.....................Thurs., June

These regular examination periods have precedence over any
special period scheduled concurrently. Conflicts must be arrang-
ed for by the instructor of the "special" class.
SPECIAL PERIODS

TO THE EDITOR
The Daily welcomes communications from its readers on matters of
general interest, and will publish all letters which are signed by the writer
and in good taste. Letters exceeding 300 words in length, defamatory or
libelous letters, and letters which for any reason are not in good taste will
be condensed, edited, or withheld from publicationat the discretion of the
editors.

Political Science 122 ................
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 .................
German 1, 2, 31 ...................
Chemistry 1, 3, 4, 21, 55 ........... .
Sociology 51, 54, 90 .................
Political Science 2 .................
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 102 ........
English 1, 2 ........................
Psychology 31 ......................
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31,

......Sat.,
.......Mon.,
.......Tues.,
.......Wed.,
.......Fri.,
.......Fri.,
.......Sat.,
.......Mon.,
.......Mon.,

June
June
June"
June
June
June
June
June
June
June
June

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5,
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32, 61, 62, 153.........................Tues.,
Speech 31, 32 .............................Tues.,

13, 2-
13, 2-

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any;
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.

necessary

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all
applied music courses (individual instruction) elected for credit
in any unit of the University. For time and place of examination
see bulletin board of the School of Music.
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, College of Engineering
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
JUNE 3 to JUNE 15, 1950
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the
time of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for
courses having quizzes only, the time of class is the time of the
first quiz period.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assign-
ed examination periods must be reported for adjustment. See
bulletin board outside of Room 3209 East Engineering Building
between May 17 and May 24 for instruction. To avoid misunder-
standings and errors each student should receive notification from
his instructor of the time and place of his appearance in each
course during the period June 3 to June 15.
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee.
TIME OF CLASS TIME OF EXAMINATION

Election ...t
To the Editor:Y
was pleased to see the question-j
naire for Student Legislature
candidates in The Daily. As Mr.
Connable pointed out, it is un-
fortunate that the candidates are
limited to "yes" or "no". in theirI
opinions on important issues. But
these brief answers accomplish a,
great deal in indicating the views1
of those we vote for. I can atleast
pick my candidates on the basis1
of opinions rather than familiar-;
ity with names from classes or
high school.,
As far as Mr. Connable's com-;
plaint about the 50-word platform
is concerned, it seems 50 words,
were more than adequate for most.
With such a limited opportunity;
to set across their ideas, some
wasted space in defining the Stu-;
dent Legislature's purpose. Inter-1
esting, but what has this to do,
with platforms? Here was the op-
portunity to clarify the "yes-no"
answers to those important ques-
tions. I noticed only four such
clarifications. Most of the candi-
dates had "clearly defined" objec-;
tives of promoting better student
government and benefiting the
student body. We voters assume
this much, or they wouldn't be
running for office. It's a good
thlhg there wasn't a 100-word
platform requested, for the candi-
dates would have resorted to quot-
ing the almanac to fill space.
My hat's off to candidates like
Hartzell who voiced three specific
aims in as many sentences.
-Lawrence Chick
* * *
Ad Nauseum...
To the Editor:
ATER READING Mr. Bershad's
brilliant work in The Daily
I feel convinced that I must have
been wrong about this country,
and I will attempt to add a few
facts in support of Mr. Bershad
(of course I cannot hope to ap-
proach his eloquence, but I will
do my best).
First, let us look at the many
things we lack under our decad-
ant capitalistic system; for one
thing concentration camps -
these are an institution of high
intellectualism, in which those
people of perverse minds who have
not seen the true beauty of Com-
munism are given an opportunity
to re-educate themselves (all ex-
penses paid by the government
too), andi thus rehabilitate them-
selves to become useful members
of society. I think we intellectuals
at the University should at once
organize a committee to begin this
worthy notion in the United
States. (FCC - the Committee for
the Furtherance of Concentration
Camps - it makes a nice set of
initials too).
Freedom of Speech - This is
a decadent notion of capitalism,
and .democracy which the com-
munists have been completely suc-
cessful in --avoiding. Under this
system the common people are
allowed to say what they think,
and this certainly is dangerous; as
such utterances should be confined
only to people of superior intelli-
gence and ability, such as Mr. Ber-
shad. Also if we did not have such
an unfortunate institution such
incidents as the banning of Mr.
Phillips would never occur, as any-
one who disagreed with the gov-
ernment to that extent would long
since be dead, and no longer able
to propigate dangerous ideals.
(Freedom of the press, and of re-
ligion are concepts of equal dang-
er, of course.)
Highest standard of living in
the world - This is another thing
that we should immediately abol-
ish, as under it we are so busy in

material gain that we do not have
time to think - and thus fail to
see the real worth of a communis-
tic society.
I think that perhaps an im-
mediate step which could be tak-
en, in order that the decadent
capitalistic minds on this campus
could get a start toward re-edu-
cation, is to build a revolving plat-
form with neon lights, (and a soap
box on top) and have Mr. Bershad
speak on the glories of Commun-
ism for 24 hours a day. No doubt
we all would soon see the true
light.
-Beecher Russell
* * *
SL...
To the Editor:
TIME TO VOTE for our repre-
sentatives to the Student Leg-
islature is approaching in the near
future. We will all be flocking to

the polls to vote, but will we be
prepared to vote wisely? We could
readily find out if we asked our-
selves these two questions: Am I
familiar with the functions of the
SL; its construction and constitu-
tion? Was I familiar with even
one-third of the candidates whose
names were listed on the ballot in
the last election?
I picked twelve students at ran-
dom and asked them these ques-
tions. To the first question as to
whether they were familiar with
the SL, eight answered no, three
answered not very well, and only
one answered yes. As to the sec-
ond question pertaining to the
number of* candidates they were
familiar with, with approximately
twenty-five listed on the ballot,
five students answered one, three
answered two, three answered
three, and only one student an-
swered five. From this it is easy
to see how unfamiliar we are with
our Student Legislature.
This ignorance, I believe, can
and should be corrected, but this
can be only brought about with
cooperation from the student
body. If we are to become SL con-
scious we must become more fam-
iliar with the functions, policies,
and above all candidates of the
Student Legislature. It is on this
point that I wish to suggest the
following plan. At some time, soon
before the election, a campaign
meeting should be held in Hill
Auditorium, or any other, suit-
able place. This meeting should
consist of two things. The inner
workings of the Student Legisla-
ture should be analyzed and ex-
plained. Then the candidates
should be introduced and should
give a short talk on their quali-
fications and the policies they plan
to pursue if elected. In this way
we could have a Student Legis-
lature which is built on a stable
and firm foundation composed of
a student body that is well in-
formed and supports wholeheart-
edly the organization that repre-
sents it in this University.
-Tim D. Slagh
* * 1
Elections . .
To the Editor:
I F EVEN 10,000 students vote,
there are, still over 10,000 who
don't vote. Why? It seems to me
we will gain additional under-
standing of ourselves and of de-
mocracy if we can find the an-
swers to this question.
Al Eglash.
IN FRANCE, the vintners' indig-
nant campaign against Coca-
Cola took the form of satirical
stories of the lengths to which
American advertising would go to
undermine the French allegiance
to wine. An 'example: "Do you
know that the Americans are
sending us 60 parrots to sit in the
best bars and scream over and
over at the customers, "Drink
Coca-Cola!"
-United Nations World
-4

If

-k

I.
9-

>A

r4

Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Monday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at
Tuesday at

8 . . . .........................Fri.,
9 ..............................M on.,
10 ..............................M on.,
11.........................Wed.,
1 .............................Thurs.,
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9 ..............................Tues.,
10..............................Tues.,
11....... .. ...................Thurs.,
1 ..............................Sat.,
2........ ..... . ............ .W ed.,
3............................Wed.,

. --s

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+

MUSIC

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+

Fifty-Ninth Year
Edited and managed by students of
the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
LeonJaroff........Managing ditor
Al Blumrosen ............ City Editor
Philip Dawsor .... Editorial Director
Don McNeil .. ,....... .Feature Editor
Mary Stein .. Associate Editor
Jo Misner ... . Associate Editor
George Walker... .Associate Editor
Wally Barth ...... Photography Editor
Pres Holmes ........ Sports Co-Editor
Merle Levin.......Sports Co-Editor
Roger Goelz .. Associate Sports Editor
Lee Kaltenbach ......Women's Editor
Barbara Smith.. Associate Women's Ed.
Business Staff
Roger Wellington .. Business Manager
Dee Nelson Associate Business Manager
Jim Dangi....Advertising M anager
Bernie Aidinoff ......Finance Mager
Bob Daniels .... Circulation Manager
Telephone 23-24-1
Member of The Associated Press
The Associated Pressris ewulusavely
entitled to the use for, republication
of all news dispatches credited to.it or
otherwise credited to this newspaper.
All rights of republication of all other
matters herein are also reserved.
'Entered at the Post Office at Ann
Arbor, Michigan, as second-class mail
matter.
Subscription during regular school
year by carrier, $5.00, by mail, $8.00.

I .'

FRIDAY NIGHT'S Festival program was
composed mostly of infrequently heard
music, but all of it was of the very highest
quality, and was well performed also.
The program commenced with a perform-
ance of the "Brandenburg" D Major Con-
certo for violin, flute, piano and orchestra,
by Bach. The performance of this deeply
felt music was all- but ideal. To be sure,
there were times when the orchestra, under
Thor Johnson, seemed lacking in rythmic
impulse, but they were comparatively few
and far between.
Of special interest was the playing of
James Wolfe, the pianist involved here.
'is playing *jas extraordinarily clean,

would shame many another contemporary
baritone.
The Bartok Viola Concerto is, like most
of that composer's late works, one which
is of immediate appeal to the listener.
While its idiom is modern in the extreme,
one has the feeling that its composer was
not using the idiom for its own end, but
rather as a tool for some tremendously
valid musical ideas. William Primrose, the
soloist, did a perfectly stupendous job of
playing, made even more remarkable when
one realizes the difficulties involved. Mr.
Johnson and the orchestra provided a
generally fine background.
Last but by no means least, was the Bach
Magnificat. There is little that can be said

C.E. 4 ..................................Sat.,
C.E. 22; E.M. 1, 2; M.E. 812; Span...........*Mon.,
Draw. 1; M.E. 13, 135; Phys. 45; Berm.......*Tues.,
Chem. 1, 3, 4; C.E. 21.....................*Wed.,
Ch-Met. 1; M.P. 3, 4, 5, 6 *Fri.,
Ec. 53, 54, 102 ............................ *Sat.,
C.E. 1, 2; Draw. 3; EngL 11; M.E. 136....,.*Mon.,
Draw. 2; E.E. 5, 160; FenchT...ues......... e,

A
s

Conflicts and Irregular................Thurs., June

Evening, 12 o'clock and "irregular" classes may use any of the
periods marked (*) provided there is no conflict. The final period
on June 15 is available in case no earlier period can be used.

. .
-.

BARNABY

No, 'Malley. There's beq n
no-census take'r here-

Well! Your Fairy Godfather will certainly
let Washington hear about this!-

-:

No. I'd just as soon they Oiidn't count me. If they did,
I'd have to make out those horrible income tax forms-
AA rerun. nn-rr cA .4nd ra Sn in nanl~mgni

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