100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 06, 1950 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TI E MICHIGAN lAILY sAT 1m

COMPLETE WITH AUTO HORN:
South Quad 'Monster' Startles Strollers

ENJOYS SHORT LIFE:
International Lanuate Dies

-- --.mss F I E D ewE

By DAVIS CRIPPEN
The 28 ton monster with a timer
and an automobile horn got back
to work on the South Quad yes-
terday.
The monster in question is the>
cement mixer-or as it's known
in the business, paver-that mixes
the concrete which is used in the
dorm's construction.
With building hampered by Ann
Arbor Weather, the paver has
been at far from top capacity.
But though inactive, it's been far
from unnoticed.
The paver's operator, Ed
Schwartz, recalled that passers-
by frequently asked him while
the machine wasn't in use, what
it was for, and then, how it op-
erated.
SCHWARTZ explained that it
was quite simple. First a dump
truck backs up into the scoop of
the paver, and drops in its load
of sand, gravel and cement mix..
The scoop - or skip as
Schwartz calls it - then goes
up, dumping its contents back t
into the mixer, where water is
added from; a tank on the paver.

* .' *: *

To Join Ghost

These ingredients then are
whirled around in the mixer. State
law requires that the mixing go
on a minute for every square yard
of cement made. That's where the
paver's timer comes in.
*I * *
AFTER the cement has been
mixed, it is transferred to a bucket
on the boom at the other end of
the machine from the skip.
This bucket then runs out the
payer's boom, and opens to drop
the cement wherever it is wanted;
possibly into a bucket which a
crane will swing up on the dorm
construction-as was being done
yesterday-or perhaps the cement
will be dropped right into the part
of the structure from where it
will be used.
Exactly how the cement is

--Daily--wally Barth
RESTING CEMENT MIXER--The skip boy stands by the scoop
end of the cement mixer being used in the construction of the
South Quad. Rearing up out of the mixer on the right is a smoke-
stack, which goes with the mixer's water heater. The heater is
used in the winter months, when the water used in the concrete
must be heated to reach the 68 degree temperature required by law.

disposed of after it is mixed,
is a much longer and more com-
plicated story than the mere
mixing of it, Harry Smith, ce-
ment foreman on the job said.
The paver's automobile horn?
That's used mostly to warn people,
Schwartz explained.

PRIZE BOOK OUT:

Man From South Dakota'
22 Years Late, Says Author
______ ./ *

George S. Reeves is "A Man
From South Dakota."
Reeves, whose 1949 Major Hop-
wood Award winning story has
just been published under that
title, admits that the autobio-
graphical tale of life during the
drought yearsin the South Dakota
hard-pan territory is "22 years
late."
A 1926 GRADUATE of the Uni-
versity in journalism, Reeves set
out after commencement to man-
age the sheep ranch left him by
his father "for about two years,
sell it-and then sit down and
write a book about my experien-
ces."
He didn't leave-until 1948-22
years later-and it took him al-
most all that time to make his
book materialize.
"I didn't publish any writing at
all until 1939, when I sold a short
story to 'Esquire.' Then I thought
I'd do a piece for them on my life
on the sheep ranch."
"THE BOOK started in 1939 as
a- 1600 word piece for 'Esquire,'
Reeves said, smiling wryly, "and
just kept growing."
He returned to the University
two year ago to enroll in grad-
uate school and take his mas-
ter's degree, "mainly because I
was determined to get the book
written," he remarked. "I also
expected to enter it in the Hop-
wood contest when I was
through."
He taught English one for three
semesters, won the $1,000 Hop-
wood essay prize in 1949, and re-
ceived his master's last Febru-
ary.
* * *
ACCORDING TO Reeves, life at
the University back in the days
"when Benny Oosterbahn was
playing, not coaching," was pretty
much the same as it is today.
As told in the chapter "From
the Mouths of Babes" devoted to
his early University days, Reeves
sat down after the first week
Convocation and "blocked out a
schedule of my academic days
that would have done credit to
a Prussian drillmaster, with cer-
tain hours devoted to the study
of certain subjects, and if an
hour appeared without some-
thing in it ... I filled the, space
with 'gymnasium' or 'recreation.'
"'When I had finished budgeting

Hold .Former
TU' Student As
CheckForger
William Jewell, 21 years old, one
time University student here, was
arrested for investigation of for-
gery Thursday afternoon in the
Union while he was playing bill-
iards.
Jewell, who was a freshman here
last year, admitted that he came
to Ann Arbor on April 27 and
borrowed a student's Union card.
With it he allegedly forged the
students name to a $50 check and
cashed it at the Union. The check
was drawn on a Kansas City bank.
WHEN THE CHECK was re-
turned to the Union on Thursday
it was marked "no such bank."
An investigation revealed that it
was forged.
The police, on a tip from a
student, managed to pick Jew-
ell up in the Union. On ques-
tioning it was learned that he
had returned to Ann Arbor to
keep a date with a University
coed.
"I had a premonition this morn-
ing that I shouldn't come to Ann
Arbor. A hunch that I would get
picked up. But I just had to come,"
he added.
At present he's being held in
the County Jail while authorities
consider issuing a forgery war-
rant.

By DONNA HENDLEMAN
The dead languages apparently
have another member on their
list.
And, contrary to the popular
belief that languages die because
they are thousands of years old
and no longer meet the needs of
the times, this one was invented
just 63 years ago by a modern
scientist.
Dean Explains
U' Functions,
LiquorBan
The issue of the University's
part in liquor enforcement boils
down to a question of a universi-
ty's function, Dean Rea explained
yesterday.
Speaking at an informal panel
discussion sponsored by the SL
sub committee on Human Rela-
tions, Dean Rea pointed out that
the University is a part of the
community. "As such it recognizes
a responsibility for the conduct
of its students, instead of func-
tioning merely as an educational
institution," he said.
*' * *
"WHEN STUDENTS over 21
lose their right to drink liquor
in their houses here, we must re-
member that the general good is
under consideration, not indi-
vidual rights," he said. " is just
another of the rightswhich stu-
dents give up when they accept
the privilege of attendance at the
University."
Legality of the University in-
spection of fraternity houses
was explained by the Dean, who
pointed out that inspection for
liquor rule violation is analogous
to inspection for fire hazards.
"And," he said, "in no case is
there inspection unless there is
evidence that a University reg-
ulation is being violated."
In answer to student question-
ing on the possibility of removal
of liquor regulations the Dean
pointed out that the University
has an obligation to respect the
state law. "The best way to do
this is to accept part of the res-
ponsibility for its enforcement,"
he declared.
Oratory Winner
Seeks Region Title
Edward Griffin, '53, winner of
the University's local James Madi-
son Oratorical Contest, will com-
pete for the midwestern regional
championship Monday.
Griffin advanced to the regional
division by winning the Detroit
area championship Thursday. He
will compete with other metro-
politan winners from San Antonio,
Chicago, Milwaukee, and Pitts-
burgh.
Champions from the three re-
gional divisions will compete for
the national championship some-
time next week.
In 1947 Griffin was a national
winner of the contest in the high
school division while he was at-
tending Redford High School. The
topic of his speech is the life and
achievements of James Madison.

s of the Past
It is Esperanto, the "interna-
tional language."
* *
INTRODUCED BY Ludwig L.
Zamenof in 1887, Esperanto is
just one of the numerous artifi-
cial languages which have been
presented to the world in the last
80 years.
Its simple grammar, which
can be mastered within a few
weeks' time, allowed it to outlast
its competitors.
For many years it was at the
top of the list of competitors for
world approval.
But currently, it too, has all but
disappeared from the public eye.
THE ESPERANTISTS seek to
establish their tongue as an in-
ternational auxiliary language to
supplement existing national lan-
guages. They aim for greater
world harmony through a medium
of communication common to ci-
tizens of every nation.
Opponents of the scheme ar-
gue that an international lan-
guage is impractical and im-
plausible. "'Language has to be
close to its people," Manf red C.
Vernon of the political science
department pointed out, "which
no artificial language can be."
Around the turn of the century,
however, active Esperantists num-
bered more than two million.
There were Esperanto congresses
and conventions, and books of all
types were written in and trans-
lated into "the language of the
world."
AND DURING the 1920's several
New York public schools put Es-
peranto on their curriculum, but
it received short-lived recognition.
At the present time the Es-
perantists advertise in obscure
world journals. And University
students may remember it as the
language presented in the ap-
titude test for incoming fresh-
men.
But its appearance on the apti-
tude test is no special boon to Es-
peranto, according to Dr. Edward
Furst of the Psychological Test-
ing Bureau. "Esperanto is used be-
cause it is probably the best of
the artificial languages for test-
ing purposes," he said, "but any
other one might be used.""
THE B'HAI religious sect in
Ann Arbor once sponsored instruc-
tion in Esperanto, but the classes,
which were taught by Prof. Hirsh
Hootkins of the Romance Lan-
guage department, have been dis-
continued in recent years."a'"
Prof. Hootkins still feels that
Esperanto would be an aid to
diplomats and international
business men. "But I don't be-
lieve it should be a spoken lan-
guage," he said, "there would
be too many dialects."
Diplomatic need for Esperanto
was questioned by N. Marbury Efi-
menco of the political science de-
partment, however. "The U.N. ap-
pears to be functioning smoothly
with its translation system now,"
he asserted. "It is a matter of
pride and prestige for the dele-
gates to use their own languages."
Continuous from 1 P.M.
- Last Times Today -

IVA
SID
saEE
FALY RNER
" A MEYRO-GOODWYN-MAYER PICTUR
--Coming Sunday -
WHEN THERE'S A
REDHEAD TO GET

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 -.54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53 -
Figure 5 average words to a line.1
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday Is 3 P.M. Saturdays
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issu.
BUSINESS SERVICES -
--- - ,--- ---------- -
A LIVE GIFT for Mother's Day. Cana-
ries, Parakeets, Lovebirds and Finches.
Mrs. Ruffins, 562 S._Seventh. )2BP
ACCURATE TYPING. Reasonable rates.
Phone 2-9437.
SPRING ITEMS NOW IN--Nearly NewC
Clothing Shop, 311 E. Huron. Ph.
3-0166. Open 12-5:30, Sat. 10-5. )8B
SHIRTS -Nine hou service (by re-
quest), three day service (regular ser-
vice). Ace. Laundry, 1116 S. Univer-
sity._ ___ )7BP
VIOLA STEIN-EXPERIENCED TYPIST
-Master's and Doctor's manuscripts
and legal work. Phone 2-9848 after
noon. _________ ____)30B
rYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales and Service
MORRILL'S-314 S. State St. )11B
HILDEGARDE SHOPPEf
109 E. washington
Expert Alterations
Custom Clothes7
by Established Tradition )3B
WASHING, ironing done in my own
home. Also rough dry and wet wash-I
ing. Free pick up and delivery. Ph.
2-9020. )1B
ERiVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Office Equipment Service Company.
215 E. Liberty. )4
DOES JUNIOR keep you from going
out? Try a reliable Baby Sitter. Kid-
die Kare, 3-1121. )10B
HELP WANTED
GIRL for part-time housework and
baby-sitting in exchange for room
and board in faculty home for sum-
mer or fall. Call 2-2009. )20H
DO YOU need any help? If so, you will
get good results from a DAILY HELP
WANTED ad. Try it and see. )7P
TRANSPORTATION
HAVE TWO SPACES open on small
student group tour of Europe. Leav-
ing June 15return Aug. 20. Contact
Bud Reisman, 2-1642. )25T
ROUND TRIP BY AIR.'NEW YORK TO
PARIS. $355. Call Dick Arnesen. 28265.
Ater 5., )24T
ROOMS FOR RENT
MEN'S ROOMS, summer and fall, sin-
gles and doubles. 1346 Geddes, 2-7044.
__________________)_70R
CLEAN COMFORTABLE ROOMS for ad-I
vanced men students, for summer
andnextmyear.sLocated 4 blocks from
campus. Kitchen and laundry privi-
leges. Shower and automatic heat.i
Shown Tuesday 12:30-4:30 p.m., Fri.
9-4:15.-415_Lawrence. )69R
NEED PRIVATE HOME accomodations_
for May Festival and commencement?3
Call 2-9850 Student Room Bureau,
12 nioon-1 PM 6-7 PM )63R
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
MEDICAL PERSONNEL
for medical and dental field
408 Park Ave. Bldg. WO 3-5789
___DETROIT, MICHIGAN )E
TRAVEL and STUDY
STUTJY INLUtOPE ThIS SUMMER.
Call Dick Arnesen, 2-8265, after 5 p.-
m., for info on low-cost study plans.
)23T
--TONIGHT
''WHITE SAVAGE''
with
MARIA MONTEZ
also
"H ELLFI RE"
starring
MARIE WINDSOR
and
FORREST TUCKER
--Tomorrow and Monday-

ROBERT MIiCUI
11IWLMINDIX
5gA

FOR SALEAkUt s a

EASTMAN KODAK, postcard size. Box W
111 Sand Creek. Call 40J. )132
ATTENTION: Navy R.O.T.C.-U.S. Navy W
type oxfords $6.88; U.S. Navy "T"
shirts 45c; Navy Black hose 30c pr.;
White shorts 59c. Open 'til 6 p.m.
Sams Store, 122 E. Washington. )5 3
WOMAN'S riding boots size 8%,. Ex- 4
cellent condition. Phone 8539 after -
5:00. )80 CC
1940 TUDOR STUDE. Comm. 1949 en-
gine, new clutch, transmission, & w
overdrive. Call after 5:00 p.m. YP
4866M11. )137
1934 DODGE-It still runs! Cheap, See
at 335 So. Division. Side entrance.
All day Sunday. )136
MATCHED SET Ralph Guldahl golf
clubs.ENever used. 4 irons, 2 woods.
$26.45. Phone 2-8692. )135
MAY FESTIVAL ARTISTS on LP's. Save -
25% too. Write Campus Classicals.
Box 141, Detroit 2,_Mich. )131
COLLECTORS ITEM-Hartnack Micro-
scope, bought in 1880. Box 111, Sand
Creek:404J. )133
WESTI$01GHOUSE FLATIRON - Never
used. $13 value for $10. Call 3-1511
_ext. 405,. )134
NEW'SPECIAL OFFER-78 weeks of
TIMV for only $6.87. New subscrip-
tions' only. Phone Student Periodical
Agency, 2-8242. )2
CUSHMAN SCOOTER 1950. Auto trans-
missionf. Used three weeks. Wind- -
shield, speedometer. Priced' to suit. A
Call 3-4592. )126
ACCORDION: German "Hohner" near-
ly new, 80 base. Phone: 2-4591, 239
Hinsdale. )127
TUX, Size 39, and all accessories. Size
15-33. Shirt. 924 E. Ann. Ph. 8177. Ask
for Norm, after 7 p.m. )128
LARGE SELECTION of classical phono-
graph records - collector's items -
at very low prices. Ken Greider at _
9400. )130 A'
MANY hard to get popular records
(78's), 35 to 45 cents each. Also near-
ly new 45 R.P.M. RCA automatic
player. Ernest McLain, 602 Soule
Blvd. Ph. 8283 125
1947 WHIZZER MOTORBIKE - Lights,
horn, basket, front and back wheel
brakes. Little mileage. Call 2-9374.
)121
MOTORCYCLE SALES-0 days only-
Many to choose from. India. M/C -
Sales, 207 W. Liberty. Ph. 2-1748.
Open evenings. )7
Cousins on State Street.
BLUE JEANS
featuring light, heavy, and extra
heavyweight denim.
2.95 and 3.95 )3
EVERGREENS-Home grown $1 to $5.
Micheal Lee, 2245 Chem. Bldg. Mon- LC
days, Tuesdays or Univ. Ext. 2412
mornings. Junipers, Spruce, Pines,
Arbor Vitae.
EVERGREENS--Small ones to raise. L
Scotch Pine, 3-5 inches. 20 forr$1.00.
Norway Pine. 12-18 inches, 4 for $1.00.
Jack Pine 12-15 inches, 5 for $1.00. L
Norway Spruce, 6-9 inches, 10 for $1.00.
Arbor Vitae 12-15 inches, 5 for $1.00.
Call Michael "Lee, Tel. as above. )116
DIAMOND engagement and wedding
rings. Large discount. Jay Angle,
wholesale representative. Ph. 2-4481.
1950 ENGLISH motorcycles $280 up. L
India M/C Sales, 207 W. Liberty. -
Phone 2-1748. Open evenings. )$3
3 SPEED ENGLISH LIGHTWEIGHTS.
$47.50. PARTS AND ACCESSORIES.
Student Bicycle Agency, 629 E. Univ.-
77 -

WHITNEY

r

.. GEORGE REEVES
* * *
my future academic time, there
was no niche or cranny of my life
that made any allowance what-
ever for a sinner who liked to loaf
-and my character was soon very
similar to the old Fordson binder
-which never tied bundles ac-
cording to plan."J
TYPICAL OF Reeves' experien-
ces in the hard-pan country was
the time late in 1936 when he was
herding his sheep around seeking
grazing on the drought-ridden
ground. He finally settled them'
in a lowland.
"Then after no rain for
months, a line storm came
threatening off in the sky, and
I knew that if I didn't want to
wake up the next day sheepless,
I had better get those animals
out of that flat mighty quick."
"But they wouldn't move, and I'
knew that the pan country up-
river would shed water like a tin
roof. About two minutes after I'd
finally growled and whipped those
sheep out of there, a tumbling'
mass of roaring water filled the
valley."
* * ,*
"THE FUNNY thing is, in those
driest years, that was the closest
I ever came to drowning in my
whole life."
Reeves, a dapper, weather-beat-'
en 45 year old man with crew-cut
grey hair, plans to publish his first
novel about the sheep business
during the war, completed in Prof.
Cowden's graduate writing course,
within the next few months.

Continuous
From
1:30 P.M.

" SUN.-MON.-TUES. e
'.':SPENCER
STEWAR
-

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

PLUS

Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be seart in
typewritten form to the Office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 255
Administration Building, by 3:00 p.m.
on the day preceding publication
(11:00 a.m. Saturdays).
SATURDAY, MAY 6, 1950
VOL. LX, No. 147
Notices
University Community Center,
Willow Village.
Sun., May 7-
Village Church Fellowship (In-
terdenominational):
10:45 a.m., Church and Sunday
School.
4:30 p.m., Study and discussion.
5:30 p.m., Pot-luck supper.
6:30 p.m., Free Family Movie.
Sponsored by the University
Wives' Club.

Mon., May 8, 8 p.m., Modern
Dance; Water-color; Ceramics
Lecture on Techniques of Glazing.
Tues., May 9, 8 p.m., Wives'
Club Farewell Party Committee;
Nur'sery Study Group.r
Wed., May 10,8 p.m., Christian
Education Committee Study
Group; Wives' Club Board; Cera-
mics.
Thurs., May 11, 8 p.m., Ceram-
ics; Choir.
IFC Sing: Fraternities or sor-
orities wishing to entertain fol-
lowing the Interfraternity Coun-
cil Sing on May 10 will be auth-
orized to do so provided chaper-
ons are listed in the Office of
Student Affairs before 12 o'clock
noon on Tues., May 9. Chaperons
may be a resident housemother or
a married couple 25 years of age
or older.
(Continued on Page 3)

ENJOY YOURSELF
Don't miss the best part of your education!
See Gilbert & Sullivan's

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan