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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 03, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'Irv mV bn Fl y n7Eld- t _

' 17IL n

Names Added to List
Of Drama Season Stars

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V

Adding to the glitter of the stars
already announced for tQ A--
Arbor Drama Season will be Meg
Mundy, Colin Keith-Johnstone,
Donald Rose, William Whitman,
Carroll Ashburn and Scott McKay.
Among the previously-announc-
ed performers in the Season,
which lasts from May 15 to June
17, are Cedric Hardwicke, Vera
Zorina, Basil Rathbone, Muriel

Wiliams To
Speak at YD
Conference

State Young Democrats Clubs
will gather in Detroit, Saturday,
for a "Democratic Victory In-
stitute" to acquaint younger par-
ty members with campaign tech-
niques, preparatory to the elec-
tion this fall.
Gov. G. Mennen Williams will
address the Institute at a din-
ner that night, and Prof. John
P. Dawson of the law school will
serve as toastmaster.
During the day, the YD will
hear talks by leading state and
national party leaders, including
Hicks Griffiths, Chairman, Demo-
cratic State Central Committee
and William Neal Roche, assistant
to the Democratic National Chair-
man, who will speak at a plenary
session.
The Institute will consist of an
all day session, during which
workshops will be conducted on
campaign procedures.

Rahn, Arnold Moss, John Alex-
ander and Joan Morgan.
* * *
COLIN KEITH - JOHNSTONE
will play the part of father in
"'The Winslow Boy''whichestars
Rathbone as the barrister. The
English actor has appeared in
"Journey's End," "The Green Bay
Tree" and "The Warrier's Hus-
band."
Taking the part of the daugh-
ter will be Meg Mundy who
achieved stardom in the exciting
production of Satre's "The Res-
pectful Prostitute" and "The
Detective Story."
Donald Rose, coming star of the
younger generation, will play the
fourteen year old son who is un-
justly accused of theft. Other
members of the cast of "The Wins-
low Boy" which will play May 30
through June 3, will be William
Whitman and Carroll Ashburn.
SCOTT McKAY who recently
appeared in "Mr. Barry's Etch-
ings," will take the part of the cru-
sading young reporter in "Born
Yesterday," opening May 22.
Besides his part as junk king
in "Born Yesterday," John Alex-
ander has accepted the role of
Caliban in "The Temptest"
which is the first production of
the season, May 15 through May
20.
Other productions of the season
include two pre-Broadway shows,
"The Barrier," June 5 through 10,
starring Murial Rahn, and Shaw's
"Getting, Married" starring Sir
Cedric Hardwicke and playing
June 12 through June 17.

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Olson Says
Youth Fears
Atom Bomb
Anxiety resulting from a gener-
al atmosphere of fear of the atom-
ic bomb may inhibit the growth of
America's future generations, ac-
cording to Prof. Willard C. Olson
of the education school.
Analysis of a survey conducted
in Ann Arbor and Monroe indi-
cates that there is a "high fear
complex of everything atomic"
among grade school students, Prof.
Olson said.
"THIS FEAR, if it becomes gen-
eral, could impede social progress
and advancement in all fields of
endeavor. It very definitely is one
of the most serious problems edu-
cators ever have faced."

Fresh Air Camp
Drive HeldToday

1

* * *

U_

* * *

Tag

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNgSDAY, MAY 3, 1950

Day -Campus

Merely the
word "atomic
number of the
in the survey.

Tradition

mention of the
bomb" upset a
children studied

By HERB CHESTON
Swimming, fishing and baseball - the answer to every kid's sum-
mer dream - will be a dream come true for 240 underprivileged boys
if University students respond with their traditional generosity to the
annual Tag Day drive today.
The coins and bills which students drop into the buckets make
possible good food, medical attention and carefully supervised activi-
ties for children conditione dto the hot streets and unhealthy envir-
onment of city life.
* * * *
THESE ARE THE "forgotten boys" of Michigan: Young boys
from the ages of seven to fourteen who, because of broken homes
I

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AAANOVL CORT. TOLLOW 4+.
IMPARTING r - IIWAJSH,.. TAKE
+ THE COACH 511MOR
N HESIDELLINE.AND -
' OUS ADVIC.E Itto
SPALOlHG A14r /
WRIGHTS-01SO Gtr < '
RACKETSAR - 1GiV.1TA ajy
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FtER-wEt~iNG araS. - R MAth? - )
BRACES ,iw.'"WRAT"lt
BINDS tMCW
rACTOW~ TEST.S EQUAL TO
TWNTY YEAR~S OF PLAY.' _. ,
S M SMWE PACE( j)IN4'sPRor5r

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"It is a problem that should
worry parents because we know
that fear, anxiety and tension are
associated with the failure of nor-
mal growth in children, both phy-
sical and mental."
* *
PROF. OLSON suggested the
formation of a "united front" of
parents, newspapers, radio sta-
tions, movies and comic books to
emphasize the constructive aspects
of new atomic developments.
But the teachers must shoul-
der the greatest responsibility,
he said. "Our job is now to edu-
cate the teachers."
"Much research has been done
in the fields of anxiety and growth
but more work must be done with
these basic studies. It is difficult
to work at the superficial level
of impact."
To secure coordinated support
for his "united front" Prof. Olson
has suggested that the Michigan
Memorial-Phoenix Project include
in its activities a basic study of
security in children.
Dylan Thomas to
Speak on Poetry
The noted Welsch poet, Dylan
Thomas, will give readings from
his poetry with commentary at
4:15 p.m. today in the Rackham
Lecture Hall.
Ranked by critics as one of the
top modern poets, Thomas pub-
lished his first book "Eighteen
Poems" in 1934, at the age of 20.
His most recent book, published
in this country, is "Selected Writ-
ings of Dylan Thomas."
His lecture is being sponsored by
the English department.
Malcolm Bingay
To SpeakToday
Malcolm Bingay, editorial di-
rector of the Detroit Free Press,
will speak on "World Beyond En-
gineering" at 7:30 p.m. today in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
The address, open to the pub-
lic, is sponsored by the engineer-
ing council.
Bingay was successively report-
er, sports editor, city editor and
managing editor of the Detroit
News from 1901 to 1929 and has
been editorial director of the Free
Press since 1930.
ADVERTISEMENT
REQUIREMENTS FOR OPTOMETRY
Five years of college work are re-
quired for the degree, Doctor of
Optometry.
The first year must be completed
in an accredited college of arts and
sciences.
The second year also may be com-
pleted in such an institution, or may
be taken at Chicago College of Op-
tometry.
The third, fourth and fifth years
are devoted to professional courses
which must be completed in an
accredited college of optometry. Fl eitaini o pna
Chicago College of optometry, 350
Belden Ave., Chicago 14, Ill. Dormi-
tory accommodations available on
the campus. The college is approved
for veterans.

and psychological problems, were selected by social agencies for the
treatment that specialized camping provides.
Today's collection is reminiscent of years past when the
youngsters, themselves, canvassed Ann Arbor with collection cans.
The practice is no longer followed, but alumni, faculty and friends
must still provide one third of the budget if the camp's program is
to be maintained.
For four weeks this summer the boys are going to live eight to
a cabin wit ha counselor who directs their special program. They're
going to swim and box and hike, and learn to live cooperatively.
4. * * *
A WARM AND SYMPATHETIC staff comprised of University
students enrolled in the Workshop in Human Behavior will be on
hand to lend an ear to their individual problems, no matter how small.
The Workshop staff, part of the University Institute of
Human Adjustment, are there with a special interest in child
welfare, spending part of their time in class and part as coun-
selors looking after the boys.
A careful watch is made of the boys' habits and actions by the
staff. It is then turned over at the end of the summer to the co-
operating social agencies who care for these boys all year.
* * *' *
AS ONE COUNSELOR who spent last year at the camp, and is re-
turning this summer said, "a summer with those boys gave me more
insight into human behavior than a year at academic studies."
This is the thirtieth year of the camp's existence.
It started as a two-week camping trip for some underprivi-
leged city boys led by a student pastor, and has grown into the
social institution that now crowds the banks of Patterson Lake
with 26 modern buildings and complete athletic facilities.
The camp has been built with the aid of University student pro-
jects, such as Michigras, JGP, J-Hop and Jazz concerts.
But each year the food for the coming summer is bought by the
proceeds from the Tag Day buckets.
The little boy on the diving board being displayed on posters in
every corner of campus is symbol of student and faculty charity, and
a monument to the students of the past who have made the Fresh
Air Camp what it is today.

I

HOW'S THE TICKER-A careful watch is kept on the physical health of the campers by the train-
ed staff of doctors and nurses always on duty. Since most of the boys come from economically un-
derprivileged environments, medical care may be one of the things they need most.

MODEL RACE CARS-Arts and crafts is one of the many facilities offered to the boys under the
specially trained staff at th ecamp. Here the final touches are applied on models nearing comple-
tion. A sense of accomplishment may be the very thing these youngsters need to adjust their psy-
chological difficulties.

4!

I
4

TESTED TO 7IYE OU
TOP CONTROL

For long-lasting liveline
uniform bounce, play
Spalding! After labora
"torture tests" -far me
gruelling than actual pl
-it still bounces well with
U S L T A rebound star
ards. Scuff-resistant n
gives true, accurate flig
game after game.
4 .

ss and
the
tory
ore " *
ay
in ? .w
nap F -,CHAMPIONSHIP
ht, iJ APP.U.SA.T.A. WOOL COVER
TCRY hIT-IT'S
TrRI9O VWiRED!
There's that same wonderful "touch" in the
new Spalding Kro-Bat-plus "power rein-
forcements" at three vital points! New

IT'S A RACE-And the one that wins is going to be proud since
that will put his group on top. Camping develops in the boys
in a sense of cooperation and group living which they need badly.

FLOATING DOWN THE RIVER-On a sunny afternoon with quiet water and a little skill Fresh
Air Campers drift dreamily along. This summer, canoeing will be added to the list of water sports
as a result of a canoe donated by Sphinx, University Junior Honor Society.

WHO WILL BE
AT MICHIGAN
Here's the pitchl If you do right by "After Six"
handsome white summer formal jacket-
"After Six" is going to do right by you. There are
prizes galore-and plenty of Female-hemale worship!

Join our Club! Learn to fly
or combine your flying abilities
at the lowest rates in History.
Eniov vourself - Get outdoors - Take advantage of this beauti-

Enter your team today. If you look best In the white

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