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May 02, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-05-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

14W

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MAY ?, 1950

17

'ADERS WANTED:
Observers Note Korea's
Administrative Problem

W-

One of Korea's greatest- prob-
ms is finding qualified men to
ssume admistrative positions,
tree Koreans and a U.S. Army
.ajor noted recently.
Major Carl Rhoads, Ahn Ho
an, Cho Sung Sik and Kim Kang
ave recently arrived in the United
tates from Korea. The three Ko-
ans are spending three to four
Choral Union
'Oractises With
['hor Johnson
May Festival Opens
At Hill on Thursday
With May Festival just two
ays awqay, Hill auditorium re-
unds with the voices of the
tioral Union currently rehears-
.g intensively under the direc-
on of Thor Johnson.
Johnson took over last week aof-
r Lester McCoy, assistant direc-
r groomed theagroup in the early
Monthas of rehearsal.
Johnson, conductor of the Cin-
nnati Symphony Orchestra, v1
ad the Chorus of 310 voices in
ie Bach "Magnificat" at the Fri-
iy night concert. Sunday after-
Don he will direct the group in
to c'ontrasting choral works-The
rahms Song of Destiny ("Schick-
Islied") and a contemporary
ork by Peter Menin, entitled "The
ycle" Symphony No. 4. The com-
>ser and his wife will be in Ann
:bor for the occasion.
The four day musical event
hich begins Thursday will be
arked by the performances of
Tloists of international repui l-
on and The Philadelphia Or-
iestra directed by Eugene 'Or-
andy, Thor Johnson and Alex-
ider Hilsberg.
A few tickets for some of the
ncerts are available at the of-
ce of the University Musical So-
ety, Burton Tower.

months observing several schools
throughout the country. On return
to Korea the men will set up a
general curriculum program.
* * *
AHN POINTED OUT that when
the Japanese left Korea after 36
years of rule, a tremendous short-
age of leaders in such activities as
schools, police force, and industry
existed. "The training for these
men had to be started from prac-
tically nothing," he commented.
Cho was teaching English in
the northern sector and was
forced to escape when the Rus-
sians took over. "They would
not allow English to be taught
in the schools. At the present
time no one is permitted to head
a school system unless he is a
Communist. Throughout the en-
tire sector the Russians are
carrying on a great Communis-
tic educational campaign," Cho
asserted.
"Although the Japanese occup-
ied our country a long time, Ko-
reans intensely hated them
throughout the occupation," Kim
said. "Our revolutionary leader
during that period was Kim Koo
who was no statesman. But he
possessed color and was able to
bring unity to the people's resis-
tance," he continued.
* * *
THE DECISION of the Yalta
Conference to split Korea into
two parts has retarded the econo-
mic growth of the country to a
great extent, Rhoads noted. "The
food and industry are in the south
while all the resources come from
the north," he said.
All four men wni take part in
a discussion "Analysis of Korean
Occupational Situation" at 7:30
p.m. today in Rm. 131 of the
average "contributions" of ten
cents pre overdue volume.
Lawyers Vie
For Awards
Four junior finalists in the Case
Clubs of the law school will pre-
sent their argurnents today before
authorities.
The men will argue the consti-
tutionality of the' United States
relinquishing sovereign rights
when entering a world govern-
ment. at 3:15' p.m. today in Rm.
100 Hutchins Hall.
The finalists wll be competing
for the $150 Henry M. Campbell
award. The winning team1will re-
ceive $100, and $50 will be divided
between the remaining men at a
banquet to be held at 6:30 p.m. to-
day in 'the Union.

Orientation
Applications
Ready at Union
Men wishing to serve as Group
Leaders in next fall's freshmen
orientation program may pick up
application blanks from .3 to 5,
p.m. today through Thursday in
the Michigan Union Student Of-
fices, according to Union staff-
man Gene Mesh, '52.-
Students aiding in the program;
will be able to register for classes
the first morning of registration
and they -will be given free meals
during Orientation Week, Mesh
said.
A plan inaugurated this year
calls for interviews next week
of all candidates, he added.
The interviews will be held to
make the process more selective
and to establish more contact be-
tween the Group Leaders and the
administrators of the program,
Mesh said.
TYPEWRITERS
RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT
REPAIRED
G.I. Requisitions
Accepted on Supplies Only
MORRI LL'S
314 S. State St. Ph. 7177
fountain pens repaired

By ROSEMARY OWEN
Students donate $3000 a year to
the University in a spirit of pure
carelessness.
The General Library system de-
livers about $250 a month, col-
lected in overdue fines, to the
cashier. This total is made up of
average 'contributions' of ten cents
per overdue volume.
Sometimes, though, Ann Ar-
borites forget their books and
the fines reach pretty big pro-
portions. $24 is the largest col-
lection on record.
One 'college joe' set off for home,
tucking a number of volumes un-

FINE ARRANGEMENT:
Forgetful Readers Contribute
To University Money Chest

41

der his arm, and forgot them for
a -couple of years. When officials
finally caught up with him, he
had lost several of them, and had
to make up the replacement cost.
* * *
IN MOST CASES the library is
more lenient. Never, is the fine
charged bigger than the cost of
replacing the book.
To deal with the recalcitrants
the library, joins in the Univer-
sity blacklist system.
Some library books seem to take
wings and fly.
But librarians report that most
of these 'stolen' books show up
before the end of the year.

4

-Daily-Barney Laschever
OPERATION 4006-Prof. Garnet Garrison, of the speech department, gets ready to signal from the
control room as Virginia Bauer, '51, and Ted Par es, '52, right, near the end of the script they're re-
hearsing for Operation 4006. Doug Weeks, '50, is directing the script which is a 10 minute condensa-
tion of a soap opera entitled "Virginia Thorton, Housewife."
* * * * * * * *
Speech Department's PhantomStation
To Broadcast T wo. Full Days' Schedule

a

Read:
SEX
ON THE CAMPUS?
MAY Coronet
NOW ON SAE

By DOLORES LASCHEVER
"This is the Operation 4006 net-
work."
That's the network cue of a
giant phantom radio station which
will broadcast a full schedule of
programs today and tomorrow and
then disappear into the ether as
suddenly as it came.
* * *
ACTUALLY a vast experimental
project conducted by the radio
division of the speech department,
Operation 4006 will involve more
than 200 students enrolled in
classes teaching every phase of
radio production except television.
The experiment, which de-
rives its name from Rm. 4006
in Angell Hall where the broad-
casts will be made, differs from
the regular networks in two
respects:
1) EACH PROGRAM will be cut
to one-third the time it would
prob ably take during a regular
day's broadcast. This will enable
nine hours of programs to be con-
densed into three hours to be pro-
duced from 7 to 10 p.m. each of the
two nights.
2) OPERATION 4006 will only
be heard over the broadcasting
system on the fourth floor of An-
gell Hall.
In every other respect, Opera-
tion 4006 will closely follow a
schedule similar to that on any
of the large networks.
Since the experiment is open to
the public,' the broadcasts will
have an audience which will hear
the programs from Rm. 4203 An-
gell Hall.
EVERY TYPE of program ima-
ginable will be offered, including
daytime serials, a comedy show,
a dramatic mystery and even a
quiz show with audience parti-
cipation.
All types of news broadcasts
from women's features to sports,
commentators and foreign news
will be produced during the sim-
ulated day's broadcasts. Even
IC Booth Displays
Imported Goods
Persian jewelry, Turkish mecer-
shaums and Persian slippers are
among the exotic objects on sale
at the International Center's booth
in the Ann Arbor Builders' Show,
at the Washtenaw County Fair-
grounds on Jackson Ave.
Merchandise estimated at more
than $500,000 is on display in the
59 indoor booths of the show,
which is open from 2 to 10 p.m.
every day. Admission is free, and
city buses run to the fairgrounds.

commercials will have their
place in each program.
Prof. Garnet Garrison, of the
speech department, who directs
the radio classes, will be in charge
of Operation 4006. He describes
the experiment as "learning by do-
ing."
* * *
PURPOSE OF the project, Prof.
Garrision said, is to give students
the feel of actually working on a
radio network.
"It's a structural device to
give a great number of students
experience in the peculiar re-
quirements of radio as a me-
dium--how it takes a great num-
ber of people working together
to put on a single broadcast
and the intensifications and mo-
difications encountered on con-
tiguous broadcasts."
Prof. Garrision, who worked for
five years in the production de-
partment of the National Broad-
casting Company before coming*
to the University three years ago,
believes the students will actually
encounter more problems than on
a regular station.
FOR EXAMPLE, he points out,
large stations have a great num-
ber of studios while Operation
4006 will use only one; and net-
works also generally have pro-
grams originating in all parts of
the country.

----N
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The fact that all scripts have
been written to order, to meet
specific problems, was stressed by
Prof. Garrision. "Everything, from
working the controls to acting in
the programs will be done by stu-
dents."

4

a

1 4

scoop

By special arrangement with the University of Michi-

gan, and as a convenience to the Seniors, we are
accepting a limited number of orders for the Official
Engraved Announcements, Cardboard Booklets, Leath-
er Booklets, and Name Cards. Deadline is Saturday
the Sixth-Positively no orders after this date. No
increase in prices.

DELIVERY GUARANTEED
LIMITED QUANTITIES

Sorry: We must insist that orders be prepaid in full.
While you are placing your order, be sure to try on
an Official Michigan Ring. There is no obligation,
no charge for engraving, and a small deposit will hold
yours until you want it. f
IT'S AT

BALFOUR'S

OF COURSE

1319 S. University

Phone 3-1733

I

i

WHO WILL BE

'iMo g0 3 i 1 b

AT MICHIGAN

Here's the pitchl If you do right by "After Six"
handsome white summer formal jacket-
"After Six" is going to do right by you. There are
prizes galore-and plenty of Female-hemale worshipI

Enter your team today. If you look best in the white
formal coat-you're eligible for the finals, and the

ii'.?.>r fir:...::> w.{{< :: .:

ii

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