100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 30, 1950 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-04-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

THE U.MICA T. .T AN T! TTy L E...

sir Av

~ ".... _,. a 11TTW1TCTTTC.7L311 fLATTV1,,. .
At L7 V T T-r, TAi -Ir FFY T TW 1:171T T 3

arhxN13AY, AYML 30, 1950'i

T.

Teninga At Ease With Pigskin or Gavel
* * * *

L kstudent Hos Rugged Life

By ROMA LIPSKY
One of the most photographe
and best-known campus figures
Wally Teninga is as much at hom
with a gavel in his hands as wit
a pigskin.
The Wolverines' star half-bac
also wields executive talents a
president of the senior class, an
as a student representative on th
Board in Control of Inter-Colle
giate Athletics. And, despite hi
gridiron fame, it is this Boar
position which he describes as th
one "I've enjoyed most and a
which I've learned most."
TENNGA'S FOOTBALL caree
began in Morgan Park High Schoo
where he played half-back foi
three years. His playing was halt-
ed during the year and one-hal
he spent in the Army, but he was
out for practice soon after re-
turning to school'here in August
1947.
The game which he remem-
bers as his most exciting ex-
perience was against Army in
1945.
"I was a freshman then, just
out of high school, and the ex-
perience of playing in Yankee
Stadium was a tremendous thrill,
one which I'll never forget," he
said.
Teninga has traveled to both
East and West coasts with the
team, his California jaunt com-
ing in the Rose Bowl game of
1948.
STARTING OUT as an engi-
neering student, Teninga switched
to economics after two years. Last
spring, he was elected president
Ballad Singers
Form Casual,
Social Group
The person who sees himself as
another Burl Ives, or anyone who
likes to sing, will find himself at
home with the small informal
group which meets every Sunday
evening for a few rounds of bal-
lad singing.
The group, about 20 strong, has
been meeting for friendly get to-
gethers for about two years, ac-
cording to Adele Hagei, '51, cam-
pus ballad enthusiast and guitar-
ist.
The idea for the group grew out
of an invitation from Prof. Ivan
H. Walton who asked several stu-
dents to his home for an evening
of relaxation and ballad singing.j
PEOPLE HEARD about the
group and called up to ask if they
could come, Miss Hager said.
Since that time the group has
grown until almost every type
of ballad and ballad singer is re-
presented at the weekly sessions.
"There's one fellow who knows
nothing but Western songs and
another who's an Elizabethan spe-
cialist but there's room for every-
one in our group," she added.
"We want everybody-both stu-
dents and faculty members-even
those who can't sing a note. They'll:
robably soon catch the infectious
spirit of the ballad which some-!
how seems to fit any mood from
deep despair to exuberant joy."
Miss Hager has great visions for
the group and predicts that it may
become a part of the Inter Arts
Union. For the present, the group
will meet every Sunday "under
the Martha Cook magnolia trees if
the weather's good but will meet
in the dormitory if it isn't."
Student Needed
For 'U' Tabulating

Positions are open for three or
four students to work as part time
key punch operators for IBM
equipment at the University Tabu-
lating Service.
Applicants must be either ex-
perienced or trained. They may
apply at the Personnel Office, 3012
Administration Building.

* *

* * *

'New Environment Sets Fast
;Temo for Future Lawyer

When a student has finished
his undergraduate studies and is
ready for law school, he is not on-
ly faced with an additional stretch
of study, but also must adjust
himself to new teaching methods'
and to an entirely new atmos-
phere of college living.
One of the first changes he
meets is in his classes. Contrary to
some of his experiences in under-
grad work, the law student can no
longer sit back and let the prof
do the work.
RATHER than lecture to the
group, the professors prefer ask-
ing students to give the facts, de-
cision, and reasoning of a case.
Then the student is literally
placed on the witness stand and
the prof takes the part of the
opposition. The professor, who
can argue both sides of the case,
never allows the student to win.
The outcome is based on the the-

ory that in losing the argument,
the student actually learns.
This informal class room pro-
cedure exposes some real per-
sonalities among the teachers.
One professor who likes to dis-
cuss a key word in a sentence,
such as "at," has gained the
title of "nebulous." Another,
who drives his points home with
his finger, has been nicknamed
"Jabby."
The law student can never feel
that he is entirely "caught up."
Constantly he must fight a tend-
ency to get too far behind or too
far ahead. The latter is exempli-
fied by the student who spent the
entire Christmas vacation, brief-
ing cases in advance, only to find
when he returned to school that
the section would be omitted.
* * * .
THE FINAL exams are the acid
test for tfie neophyte lawyer. They
are the only formal exams he re-

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
VERSATILITY PLUS-Walt Teninga has pulled the Wolverines
out of many a tight spot on the gridiron. His activities however,
have not been limited to the football field. He is a member of
the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics and the Literary
College Senior Class President.

* * *

'>

* *

of the literary college senior class.
On the night of the, election he
couldn't be located for two hours
after his victory was established.
"I was so nervous about the
election that I couldn't go near
the Union where ballots were
being counted," he explained.
In addition to football, class
and athletic board positions, Te-
ninga is also a member of Michi-
gamma, men's honorary, and Sig-
ma Chi fraternity. He is also well-

known for completely disproving
the adage that grid stars are low
on the scholastic scale.
* * *
AFTER graduation this June,
Teninga plans to begin working
with a savings and loan company
in Chicago. He has received sev-
eral offers in professional football,
but has turned them all down.
Teninga described pro football
as "not good. You get lots of
money, but the accident risk is
very high."
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ar-h-nl omlexm er--

COLLEGIATE GOTHIC-Legal Research building, one of the
structures making up the compact nucleus of the law school
quadrangle, is designed after the collegiate gothic style. This type
which is derived from the English gothic style is also used on the
Harvard and Oxford campuses. The clerestory windows carry
the seals from a large number of universities. Placed in the
windows of the tower are seals from several states.

with DOLORES LASCHEVER
________________________________________

"The easiest thing I've ever
done."
This is how Groucho Marx des-
cribes his new radio show, "You
Bet Your Life."
And it's the impression the radio
audience gets from listening to the
rapid "stream-of-conscious" hum-
or which is peculiar to the Groucho
wit.
.* * *
WITH EQUAL ease Groucho
has managed, within a few short
weeks, to get a story about him-
self in Time magazine, a seven
page spread in Look and an ar-
ticle in the New York Times.
This ease further extends it-
self to the amazing climb of
his pseudo-giveaway show from
an embarrrassing 75th place in
the radio ratings to a coveted
sixth place spot.
Yet, such success on the air-
waves wasn't always so easy for
the Ve-spectacled, be-mustached
humorist. It's taken 15 years and
four radio flops to make him the
up-and-coming "thing" among
any of the network shows:
*A * *
WHAT IS it that's put Groucho
where he is? What does he have
that makes a success of a give-
away show, a kind of program
which generally rates as low as
a low IQ can get without its owner
being confined to an asylum.
Strangely enough he boasts a
brand of humor which smacks
close to lunacy itself. Yet, it's
a kind of logical lunacy, a form
of surrealism "which has put
him high on the list of intellec-
tuals, logicians and schizophren-
ics."
Add to this a group of carefully
screened contestants chosen for
their strange jobs, volubility and
insensitivity-Groucho's pointed
remarks can be pretty penetrating
at times-and you have one of the
funniest programs to hit the air
in a long time.
* * *
HERE'S A sampling of the
Groucho humor:
GROUCHO: Is it true that

you wrestlers fake most of your
matches?
PROFESSIONAL W R E S T-
LER: That's a dirty rumor!
GROUCHO: How many dirty
rumors have you wrestled late-
ly?
It also takes a pretty strong con-
testant to withstand jibes like the!
one he asked a member of the
House of Representatives: "How,
long have you been incongruous?"
Then there was the time a school
teacher confessed she was ap-
proaching 40 and he asked, "froml
which direction?"I
PUNS LIKE the following leave
his listeners weak in the knees,
weak in the stomach and weak inI
the head:
"Ah, the Alps. I love the Alps.
So does God, because God alps
them that alps themselves."
The only thing that can stop
Groucho's phenomenal rise is the
Supreme Court's decision on the
FCC's anti-lottery ban of give-
aways which is due within the
next three months. In the mean-
time, to say that Groucho is going
places would be a major under-
statement. He's already gone.
- _______ - --______ -

ceives during the entire term. The
student is never faced with the
problem of parroting back what
he has learned. Rather, he is faced
with a unique problem and is
forced to apply the principles
learned.
Often there is no right or
wrong answer. For example, the
whole decision in a personal in-
jury case may depend on the in-
terpreted actions of the RPM,
better known as the "reasonable
prudent man."
The lawyers existence seems to
be built around books. He must
learn where and how to find the
law, more than how to tuck each
insignificant point into his mind.
To aid in this part of his educa-
tion, the Law Library, contain-
ing around 216,000 volumes, is at
his disposal.
* * *
NOT MORE than a step from
his classroom, is the Lawyer's
Club, a residence that boasts com-
fortable living. The law student
has a large, carpeted room. A maid
makes his bed each morning.
Room repairs are taken care of
immediately.
The house mothers live up to
their title. Exempting the maids
and housemothers, the Law
Quad is strictly a man's world,
for not even your mother is al-
lowed inside.
The law students hail their food
the best on campus. Informal
breakfast and lunch are served
cafeteria style. Dinner is served
family style complete with waiter
service. Following the Navy tra-
dition of no shop talk at the
table, discussion of the exams,
during or after the meal is frown-
ed upon. The entire atmosphere
breeds contentment.
* ~**
AS MIGHT be expected, the
law student who studies hard, al-
so plays hard. When he leaves his
books for relaxation, he really
"lets down his wig." His formal
social life consists of several dances
including the Crease Ball, a Win-
ter and Spring formal, faculty
teas and a Christmas party.
Informally, the law student
likes to relax in a normal bull
session in which topics run from
politics to women to law. Cur-
rently a musical fad is running
through the Quad, the medium
being ukeleles.
Because of the load of work and
the older age of the students, un-
dergrad women are not the fav-
orite dating material. The tradi-
tional connection with Martha
Cook is for convenience only. As
one student put it, "We are under
no legal obligation to them."
THE LAW STUDENT is not a
notorious activity man, but he
has his outside interests. Many
deal with some phase of law such
as, The Case Club, Law Student
Association, and Barristers, a se-
nior honorary society. An interest
in sports exists beyond the famous
football team which clashes with
Martha Cook. A choral group is
one of the more popular outside
activities.
Although the law student does
participate in activities'and have
outside interests, the fact remains
that the Law School is his prime
interest. The average student does
not find time for Student Legis-
lature, the Union, J-Hop or the
other important undergrad activi-
ties.
The reasons become more ob-
vious when we consider that the
majority of law students are vet-
erans. They are older and more
mature men. Many are married or
engaged. A great majority have

done their undergraduate at other
schools. Their life is centered
around the Law Quad. They tend
to miss the undercurrent of spirit
that the student, whose life is cen-
tered around the diag, receives.

a

A .

A

LAW SCHOOL DEAN-Dean E. Blythe Stason of the law school
has been at the helm for the last 11 years. Before that time he
served here as a professor of law. He received his law degree from
the University of Michigan in 1922.

4

WORD EAGER-After a long day with the books R. W. Hansley,
53L, and R. L. Meyer, 53L still find it relaxing to ease back with
the latest copy of some magazine. The law quad lounge is one
of the more popular places for students to read and converse in
an informal atmosphere. Topics usually range from politics to
law to women.

IF

'I

IT'S A
PLEASU RE
TO BE
YOUR HOST
at the

,A
.'

ALL ENE L
i~i~ -Z--

.. .

MUSIC HATi CHARMS-Even the law students to whom books
prove an enticing interest are attracted to the simple sounds of
the ukeleles. Tom Calay, 52L, provides entertainment for the
two scholarly students Vern Witham, 51L, and Lew Williams, 51L.
The ukeleles are currently in vogue with the more musical mem-
bers of the Law Quad.

LABORATORY OF BOOKS-Dean Olds, 52L, delves into one of
the 216,000 volumes of the Legal Research library. The library
holds the place of a laboratory to the law student. He must learn
where and how to find the law, more than how to tuck each
insignificant point into his mind. Many times the difference
between winning and losing a case may depend on the complete-
ness of the preliminary briefing.

10 pair-FREE TICKETS-10 pair

A
Daily
Photo
Feature
Story by
'aiAI / ,'.

,
.

May 12 & 13-8:00 P.M. and Sun., May 14-3:00 P.M. (Mother's Day)

II

1. When was "IOL ANTHE" first Dnrri?A

0

- * .,:... ** ~ ,,~ ,*. r -

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan