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April 28, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-04-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHI A1*I AILY

4

FRIDbAYAPRM 8. t1950

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iMiit NOS 1.7UV

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oWin Speaks

NINE PAGES OF PICTURES:

)n Origin of National
turns'BPoems y PETER HOTTON
"An Hour with Robert Burns" .Ever stand on your head
as offered by Rev. Frederick Co- picture?
n, pastor-emeritus of the Ann dAlfred Eisenstaedt does it
'bor Memorial Christian Church, ay.
this week's Speech Assembly. Eisenstaedt, a staff photog
The publication of bawdy, coarse er for Life Magazine, didi
ems under Burns' name was ex- two weeks last March coverin
ained by Mr. Cowin as the result University medical schooli
a printer's attempt to obtain nine and a half-page sprea
known works of the poet. pearing in today's Life.
* * * * * *

Magazine Features led School

for a
every
graph-
it for
ng the
for a
d ap-

FTER BURNS' death, his wife,
realizing what they were, gave
i~ printer many of the peasant
gs which the poethcollected.
se were later published in a
k titled "Merry Muses," ac-
ing to Mr. Cowin.
'Burns often collected these
arse, bawdy songs from the
mtry peasant, and put them
ay in his drawer to work over
ter," Mr. Cowin said. He
med "John Anderson, My Jo"
d "Coming Through the Rye"
examples of these worked-.
er songs.
copy of the Kilmarnock edi-
, or first publication, of Burns'
ins is worth $15,000 today,
ed Mr. Cowin. There are only
copies of this edition. in exis-
e today, he added.
Considering its size, this is the
t expensive book in the world
y," said Mr. Cowin, "And all
ns got out of it was $100.

EISENSTAEDT and Bob Drew,
Life staff correspondent, traip-
sed around the med school, Uni-
versity Hospital, a med student's
rooming house and even a Uni-
versity-connected hospital in Bay
City, filling up every second of
their two-week sojourn, taking'
students' and faculty members'
valuable time without a squawk
about tight lab schedules or miss-
ing a class or' two. The story is
Eisenstaedt's fourth on the Uni-
versity.
Charmed b y Eisenstaedt's
technique, not even the most
hard-hearted doctor would re-
fuse to melt. He never tries to
browbeat his subjects, but "co-
erces" them to do whatever he
likes by flattery and steady con-
versation.
A persuasive personality is not
the only necessity for a photo-
grapher, as Eisenstaedt must often
contort himself into all kinds of
shapes and situations.
Of the lead shot in the article,
he confided: "I had to get that
bicture standing practically on
top of a cadaver."
MORE THAN 1500 pictures were
taken during the two-week stay,
and Eisenstaedt thought that "25
or less" would be used in the final
article.r
Eisie, as everyone called him
after he was on campus a day,
works quickly and quietly, and
gets things done. Carrying two
heavy cases full of cameras, tri-

Stason Lauds
Great Britain's
Administration
Lists Advantages of
Foreign Systems
The United States can learn
much in the field of discretionary
powers from a study of measures
used in England and Western Eur-
ope, Dean E. Blythe Stason of the
law school declared yesterday.
Lecturing on "Some Foreign Ex-
perience" Stason continued with
the fourth in the current annual
Thomas M. Cooley Lecture ser-
ies.
"THE ENGLISH have gone very
far down the road of administra-
tive law, but they have provided
for two important checks against
-unwise use of this power, Stason
asserted.
"The Select Committee on
Statutory Instruments is simi-
lar to the Michigan Plan men-
tioned in the second lecture. It
reports to the House of Com-
mons any unusual or unexpected
use of powers conferred," Stason
said.
He pointed out that advisory
committees were also functioning
as a preventive checkagainst un-
wise administrative action.
"THE COURTS in such coun-
tries as France and Italy are in
possession of broad legal powers.
They can enforce the spirit in
which the law was written, as well
as search into the motivations of
particular administrative action,"
Stason explained.
"In Sweden the plaintiff has
free access to all documents con-
cerning his case, within the limits
of non-security material.
Petitions Due
For Activities
Student organizations planning
to sponsor major campus events
next year should submit petitions
to the Student Legislature calen-
dar committee before 5 p.m. today,
according to Arnold Miller, '50,
chairman of the committee.
"Each organization should l1st
two date preferences," Miller said.
"We will attempt to give each
group its first choice of dates," he
added, "but in cases of conflict
we will have to make our recom-
mendations on the merits of each
petition."

9w

TO TALK-Dr. W. S. Carlson,
president of the University of
Vermont, will speak at Honors
Convocation today.
(See Story Page One)
Hopwood Entries
Fifty-one contestants have sub-
mitted 71 manuscripts in the an-
nual Hopwood Contest in creative
writing, according to Prof. Roy
W. Cowden, Award Director.

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Just Received
All wool
MICHIGAN
BLAN KETS
$10.00
UL RICH'S

LIFE VISITS THE 1MED SCHOOL-Life Photographer Alfred
Eisenstaedt, camera in hand, poses medical student Bill Felner,
left, and Prof. Bradley Patton of the anatomy department for a
picture story appearing in today's Life magazine. Prof. Patton
demonstrates a human fetus still in the placenta, visible in his
hand.

Sizes 6 to 12

M1

I

pods and other equipment, he
sometimes takes an hour or more
to set up his subjects, which
range in the article from piles
of books to live patients.
But once he gets his subjects
in the desired position, he buckles
down to business, sometimes snap-
ping the shutter as fast as his
finger can move.
Most of the time he keeps his
subjects in the same positions for
a dozen or more shots, changing
their positions only slightly or
moving his camera for a different
angle.
* * * ,
HIS LARGEST CASE, the size
of a small trunk, weighs a trifle

--I-

*

*: * *

RCA VICTOR

too much for Eisenstaedt to lug
up and down stairs and through
long corridors, so he put a set of
casters on its bottom.
"I am the only photographer
in the world who has rollers on
his case," he declared.
For all the equipment he car-
ries, Eisenstaedt only carries four
cameras, and he could get them
all into a typewriter case.
Life's object in running the
story, acording to Drew, is to tel-
escope four years into two weeks
to present a candid picture of a
University student in his journey
from his acception to the school
to his graduation.
ra Scenarios
rsole Says
script before the end of the se-
mester, so that writers will have
plenty of time to polish it up be-
fore production begins," he ex-
plained.

. anzd . . .
RED RUBBER SOLES
FOR SMART STYLE
AND EXTRA COMFORT

Worn by campus style leaders throughout America.
Come in for your pair today.
MflST3

HONORS

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619 East Liberty

4,

Ph. 2-0266

With a group of NEW ISSUES
available on 331/3, 45 or 78 RPM

_

BEETHOVEN:,rLeonore Overture No. 3
BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 3 in E-Flat, Op. 55
("Eroica")
BEETHOVEN: Concerto No. 1 in C, Op. 15 with
Dorfman
BERLIOZ: Romeo and Juliet (Dramatic symphony)
GROFE: Grand Canyon Suite
HAYDN: Symphony No. 101 in D ("Clock'')
MOZART: Symphony No. 35 in D, K385 ("Haffner")
MOZART: Divertimento No. 15 in B-Flat, K287
RAVEL: Daphnis and Chloe, Suite No. 2
ROSSINI: Overtures
ROSSINI: William Tell Overture
SCHUBERT: Symphony No. 9 in C
TCHAIKOVSKY: Symphony No. 6 in B Minor, Op. 74
("Pathetique")
TCHAIKOVSKY: Romeo and Juliet (Overture-Fantasia)
TCHAIKOVSKY: Manfred, Op. 58 (Symphonic Poem)
WAGNER: Parsifal, Prelude and Good Friday Spell

New Union Ope
Due June 1, Ebe
e
Union Opera manager Jim Eber-
sole, '50, has set a June 1 deadline
for the submission of scenarios
from which the script of next
year's opera will be chosen.
"We plan to choose next year's
Reveal Law
Appointment
Roy L . Steinheimer, Jr., of New
York City has accepted the ap-
pointment of associate professor
of law at the University Law
School, Dean E. Blythe Stason an-
nounced yesterday.
Since 1940, when he received
his Juris Doctor degree from the
University, Steinheimer has been
working in the litigation depart-
ment of a New York law firm.
Slated to join the faculty in the
fall, he will teach courses in pro-
cedure, equity, and creditor's
rights.
Educators Here
For Conferences

lp

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25th. Anniversary

SCENARIOS MUST be complete,
with spots for all songs, dances
and production numbers indicated.
A full sketch of all characters
must accompany all scenarios,
Ebersole said.
In addition complete dialogue
for at least two scenes must be
included, if the scenario is to be
considered, according to Eber-
sole.
"We are asking for dialogue in
order to get samples of each
writer's dialogue-writing ability,"
the Opera manager said.
He suggested that scenarios in-
clude situations which would pro-
vide plausible spots for big pro-
duction numbers.
4, * *
SCENARIOS should be address-
ed to Union Opera and turned in
to the main desk in the lobby of
the Union on or before June 1,
Ebersole said.
He also reminded men interested
in executive positions on the 1951
Union Opera staff that their let-
ters of application must be sub-
mitted by Monday.
Museum Health Films
Films on "Meiosis" and "Body
Defenses Against Disease" will be
presented by the University Mu-
seums at 7:30 p.m. today in Kel-
logg Auditorium.

To Celebrate the Opening of the Campus Bootery 25 years ago we offer
for Just 8 Days real bargains on our huge stock of Fine Shoes. All Spring
Styles Included.
You Will Save Plenty on Each Purchase April 28 to May 6

'I

Hear these latest RCA VICTOR
releases at the
Mus S

Educational conferences anTI
meetings will bring more than
3,500 teachers and high school
students to Ann Arbor this week-
end.
Principal events are the annual
meeting of the Michigan School-
masters' Club and the champion-
ship-debate of the Michigan High
School Forensic Association.
Preuss in Washington
Prof. Lawrence Preuss of the
political science department is at-
tending the annual meeting of the
American Society of Internationlal
Law in Washington.

205 East Liberty

Phone 2-0675

Operated by Musicians for Music-Lovers

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The University of Michigan Flying Club
invites you to attend its
ANNUAL OPEN HOUSE

'I kl if!

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