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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 22, 1950 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


1950

IFHE MICHIGAN DAILY

Hilelzapoppin' To Be Given
At Pattengill Tomorrow Night
Fraternities, Sororities To Present Skits
In Annual Hillel Benefit Revue

SOPHOMORES NOT SO SILLY:
Monte Carlo, Constellations, Shakesphere
Provide Themes for Past Soph Cabarets

The curtain on "Hillelzapopp-
in'," annual Hillel Foundation
sponsored benefit revue, will go up
at 7:45 p.m. tomorrow at Pat-
tengill Auditorium, with five 15
minute skits scheduled for pre-
sentation.
Proceeds of the show will go to
the campus United Jewish Ap-
peal drive.
ThREE FRATERNITIES, Sig-
ma Alpha Mu, Kappa Nu and
Alpha Epsilon Pi, will be featured
in 'the show. The "Traumatic
Players," independent group, and
Sigma Delta Tau, will also offer
presentations.
Under Victor Hurwitz, the
"Sammies" will present "A Tril-
ology in Two Acts" and the
Kappa Nu's, under Herb Rov-
ner, will offer "If Men Rushed
As Women Do." "The Plotters"
under Arch Snider, will be pre-
sented by Alpha Epsilon Pi.
The "Traumatic Players" will
introduce their new play, "Bed-1
Ground" under Betty Robinson,
and Sigma Delta Tau, last year's
winners, will show what the
world is like beyond American
borders, in "Outside U.S.A." un-
der Lee Benjamin.
DECIDING who will win this
year's gold loving cup for the best
skit will be Prof. Garnett Garri-
son, of the speech department,
Prof. Hugh Norton, of the speech
department, Prof. Samuel Elders-
veld of the political science de-
partment, Prof. Norman Maier
of the psychology department and
"Miss Mac" of the League.
Sigma Delta Tau will be try-
ing for its third straight win
tomorrow. Three-year winners
are entitled to keep the cup
permanently.
Remaining tickets for the per-
formance may be purchased in
the League lobby from 1 to 4 p.m.

today, or
tomorrow
ditorium.

before the performance
night at Pattengill Au-

Weddings&
Engagements
Campbell - Strciatsma
Mr. and Mrs. E. Fletcher Camp-I
bell of Plymouth have announced
the engagement of their daughter,
Ruth, to Bradley R. Straatsma,
son of Dr. and Mrs. Clarence R.
Straatsma of New Rochelle, New
York.
Miss Campbell is a senior in the
School of Music and is a member
of Wyvern and Scroll. She is af-
filiated. with Mu Phi Epsilon and
Delta Delta Delta.
Mr. Straatsma is a graduate of
the University of Michigan and is
a member of Phi Eta Sigma and
Sphinx. He served on the Execu-
tive Council of the Michigan
Union and is affiliated with Phi
Delta Theta.
At present Mr. Straatsma is a
junior at Yale University School of
Medicine and has been appointed
to the International Grenfell As-
sociation Hospital at St. Anthony,
Newfoundland for the summer.
Smith - Dangl
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Smith of
Grand Rapids have announced the
engagement of their daughter,
Joan, to James A. Dangl, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Dangl al-
so of Grand Rapids.
Mr. Dangl is a senior in the
School of Business Administra-
tion and is Advertising Manager
of The Daily. He is a member of
Delta Sigma Pi.
The wedding will be in August
in Grand Rapids.

-Daily-Carlyle Marshall
HA-CHA-A snappy Charleston routine by Sue Sherman and
Joyce Briskman will highlight the Sigma Delta Tau skit as the
curtain rises Sunday night on Ilillelzapoppin" in Pattengill
Auditorium.
Counselor Posts Still Open
For Wolverine Girl's State

By JAN JAMES
In spite of the old saying, the
sophomore women are not quite
so silly, as has been proven by
their annual presentations of
Sophomore Cabaret.
From the very first project,
"Bungling Brothers Circus" of
1927, to last year's shocking of
Shakespeare, "As You Shake It!",
Soph Cab has remained a yearly
campus highlight.
After following a circus theme
for several years, the sophomore
women decided to present the
Cabaret for the first time in 1929.
At this time, it was staged in
Barbour Gymnasium.
WITH A MARDI GRAS theme,
the Cabaret moved its head-
quarters to the League in 1931. In
keeping with the mood of the fes-
tivities, the floorshow featured a
puppet chorus with the dancers
wearing vibrant Mardi Gras
masks.
Events took a turn to the
nautical when the class of '35
overwhelmed the spectators
with a chorus of gobs and a
ballroom converted to a ship.
Brass rails come and go, but
the memory of the one featured
in the 1933 Cabaret remains .in
the memory of the campus. The
gay and naughty nineties inspired
this return to the days of bustles
and handlebar moustaches.
THE CLASS OF '38 featured a
"Pseudo Psilly Symphony" as
their cavorting Cabaret.
' Monte Carlo and its reputa-
tion, for fantastic funmaking
was featured at the 1941 version
of the Cab. This was the last
production of the Cabaret for
the duration of the war years.
In 1944, campus life was again
livened up with the Cab's Music
Box. This was the first time, that
the sophomore women took over
the entire second floor of the
League for their class project.
THE CLASS OF '51 featured a
visit to the far flung planets for
their presentation of the Cab.
lAlong with a Mar's Bar and Apol-

lo's Sun Palace, the women also
staged a floorshow narrating a
"Date With Jupiter."
With the concourse decorated
as earth, those attending the
Cab quickly took the hint to
come back from drifting in the
clouds.
The League really shook when
the class of '52 presented their
"As You Shake It!" this year.
With a Romeo in white bucks and
a Juliet in Shockwell Hall, Shake-
speare would never have recog-
nized "A Midwinter's Nightmare."
* * *
PADDLING a canoe across the
Diag, the class of '52 further over-
whelmed the campus when male
students received kisses, the candy

version, inviting them to attend
the Cab and shake hands with
the English bard.
Throughout all the years of
its presentation, the Cabaret
has constantly been of help to
the sophomore women in be-
coming better acquainted with
each other through working on
a mutual class project.
It also provides the women with
the opportunity of working for
the benefit of a worthwhile pro-
ject selected by the central com-
mittee members.
Last but not least comes the
fun and fellowship resulting from
the -sophomores striving together
to set the campus back on its
heels!

"1

hl

2

WAA NOTES

Applications are still being ;c-
cepted for counselor positions for
Wolverine Girl's State which will
be held here from June 19 to 27.
Coeds who would like to work
with outstanding high school stu-
dents from all over the state dur-
ing the convention may apply now
with Miss Ethel McCormick at
the League. They will be called
for an interview with Miss Miriam
Brown, Chief Counselor of Wol-
verine Girl's State within the next
few weeks.
COUNSELORS will have the op-
portunity to participate and ad-
ministrate in a nationally recog-
nized program designed for voca-
tional guidance and practice in
democratic government.
The convention will also of-

fer group planning and leader-
ship for the social work and
physical education majors as
well as for those interested in
recreational music and drama-
tics.
The staff will receive $20 as re-E
muneration plus room and board,
and will be able to enjoy many of
the privileges and facilities of the
University while participating in
the program.
REGULAR MEMBERS of the
University staff will offer instruc-
tion and demonstration in house-
hold arts, home economics, hospi-
tal work, dramatics, fine arts,
physical education, dietetics and
actual experience in governmental
procedure and its functions.
Each counselor will be assigned3
to a town consisting of about 14
high school students.

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The softball tournament will go. Kappa Gamma I vs. Stockwell
to its second week of play with XVI*; Delta Gamma II vs. Hins-
ie following games scheduled: dale I*; Stockwell XV vs. Kappa
Monday at 5:10 p.m. - Delta Delta I*; Barbour II vs. Alpha
amma I vs. Mosher I;, New- Omicron Pi II ; at 7 p.m. - Pal-
erry I vs. Kappa Alpha Theta mer House vs. Chi Omega II*;
I*; Stockwell I vs. Adelia Chee- Sorosis vs. Stockwell XVIII*;
r*; Zeta Tau Alpha vs. Delta Stockwell IV vs. Kleinstueck I*;
elta Delta II*; at 7 p.m. - no Martha Cook II vs. Stockwell III*.
Imes. The starred team is responsible
Tuesday at 5:10 p.m. - Hins- for the bases, the other team for
ale II vs. Alpha Delta Pi II*; An- the basket with the remainder of
eI vs. Kappa IKappa Gam the equipment. If there are any
*; Alpha Delta Pi vs. Stockwellth eqimn.Iteraeay
*; Newberry II vs. Kappa Al- questions, call Vivian Frazier,
ha Theta I*; at 7 p.m. - Angell 2-2569.

-

1-- .1

a 1

I

I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I vs. Alpha Chi Omega ,*; Bar-
bour I vs. Hinsdale III*; Alpha Xi
Delta I vs. Jordan III*; Stockwell
II vs. Jordan VII*.
Wednesday at 5:10 p.m. - Pi
Beta Phi II vs. Kappa Alpha The-
ta II*; Alpha Omicron Pi I vs.
Mary Markley*; Stockwell XII vs.
Stockwell X*; Stockwell XI vs.
Gamma Phi Beta I*; at 7 p.m. -
Chi Omega I vs. Newberry III';
Delta Delta Delta III vs. Hender-
son House*; Jordan V vs. Wes-
leyans*; Newberry IV vs. Jordan
II*.
Thursday at 5:10 p.m. - Kappa
Ed. School Plans
Party at University High
Education School faculty, stu-
dents and wives will get together
for a party at 7:30 p.m. Monday in
the recreation room of University
High School.
A recreational program is plan-
ned including games and dancing.
Pi Lambda Theta and Phi Del-
ta Kappa, honorary education so-
cieties, will be hosts.

j

PLAYS SHOW TUNES
I N"DAN CE HAPPY IS"

(Continued from Page 2)

lf.;
_1

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Earl Grandstaff, Acting Minister
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
10:50 A.M.: Morning Worship (This service is
broadcast over WHRV). Sermon topic: "No
Longer I but Christ."
Nursery for children during the service.
GUILD HOUSE: 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Minister to Students
Jean Garee, Associate
STUDENT GUILD: 6:00 supper at the Congrega-
tional Church. A program entitled "And So
Tomorrow" will be presented by members of
the Guild.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student
Counsellor
Roger Williams Guild, 502 East Huron
10:00 A.M.: Bible Study--Ezekiel.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worshi--Sermon by Rev.
Loucks on "Investment in Tomorrow."
6:00 P.M.: Guild Meeting-Cost Supper and
fellowship. Rev. Malcolm Ballinger, Chaplain
at University Hospital, will speak on "Chris-
tianity and Pain."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue-Phone 2-0085
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Adult Discussion Group. Prof. Albert
Marckwardt on "The Problem of the Court-
house."
11:00 A.M.: Sermon, "Mastering Fear" by Ed-
ward H. Redman.
7:00 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group at the
home of John Morris, 723 Lawrence, to de-
part for Wiener Roast, weather permitting.

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
Harold J. DeVries, Pastor
9:15 A.M.: "Your Radio Choir" WPAG.
10:00 and 12:00 A.M.: Bible School Sessions.
11:00 A.M.: "It Pleased the King."
6:30 P.M.: Grace Bible Guild Supper.
7:30 P.M.: How old-the Old Story?"
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday morning Services. Subject,
April 23-Probation after Death
9:30 A. M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Services.
A free reading room is maintained at 211 East
Washington Street where the Bible and all
authorized Christian Science literature may be
read, borrowed, or purchased.
This room is open daily, except Sundays and
holidays, from 11:30 to 5 P.M.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
National Lutheran Council
1304 Hill Street
Henry O. Yoder, D.D., Pastor
9:10 A.M.: Bible Class at the Student Center.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Services in Zion and Trinity
Churches.
5:30 P.M.: Lutheran Student Association Supper
Meeting in Zion Lutheran Parish Hall.
7:30 P.M. Tuesday: "What Do Lutherans Be-
lieve"--Discussion at the Center.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
No. Division at Catherine

School of Music, 8:30 p.m., April
22, Hill Auditorium. Male choruses
from Kalamazoo, Flint, Lansing,
Grand Rapids, Detroit, and other
Michigan cities will be heard dur-
ing the first half of the program.
After intermission, guest conduc-
tors will lead the massed group of
740 voices in several songs. Open
to the public without charge. Tic-
kets are available from any mem-
ber of the Chorus; Jahnke Ser-
vice Station, William & Maynard;
Information Desk, Administration
Bldg.; School of Music office; and
on Sat., April 22, from the box
office of Hill Auditorium.
Student Recital: Harriet Risk,
Cellist, will present a program at
8:30 p.m., Mon., April 24, Rack-
ham Assembly Hall, in partial ful-
fillment of the requirements for
the degree of Master of Music. A
pupil of Oliver Edel, Miss Risk will
play compositions by Haydn,
Bloch, and Beethoven. The public
is invited.
Events Today
Michigan Student Christian
Convocation: Buses will leave for
Kalamazoo from Lane Hall, 6:45
a.m.
International Center Open House:
2:10 p.m. Special exhibit.
Premedical Society: Hospital
tour, 3 p.m. Meet in University
Hospital lobby. Limited to first
forty persons.
Sports Night: IM Building, 7:30
to 10 p.m. All faculty members,

<teaching fellows, wives, children
and guests are invited. For further
information, phone Mrs. W. Y. Ei-
teman, 5474.
U. of M. Hostel Club presents
first of series of week end bike and
hike trips. Meet at League, 2 p.m.,
to bike to Lochalpine (eight miles).
Back by 6:00 p.m.
Inter-Arts Union: General elec-
tion meeting, 2 p.m., Kalamazoo
Room, League. All persons partici-
pating in any Inter-Arts function
this year invited.
Coming Events
Grad Outing Club: Meeting, 2:15
p.m., Sun., Rackham Bldg. Final
plans for overnight (April 29-30);
reservations still available.

"LARRY GREEN (above) plays
Vincent Youmans" . . . Tea for
Two, Carioca, 4 others, in a big
new RCA Victor album "Designed
For Dancing"! 15 of these new
dance albums just out! . . . fea-
turing 15 big-name bands, 15
famed composers . . . 90 hits!
Every record the danceable kind
you've wanted ! Get all 15. At
Lyon and Healy Inc., 508 E. Wil-
liam.
-7

11

Mademoiselle's

1950

Michigras
Special flU

U. of M. Hot Record
Record program on New
jazz, ABC room, League,
Sun,

Society:
Orleans
8 p.m.,

VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
(Interdenominational)
University Community Center
Willow Run Village
Rev. J. Edgar Edwards, Chaplain
John R. Hertzberg, Director of Sacred Music
10:45 A.M.: Divine Worship, Easter Sunday.
Sermon: "Beyond Death." Anthems: "Halle-
lujah Chorus" Handel, "Russian Easter Carol"
Harvey Gaul.
10:45 A.M.: Church School and Nursery.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Av.
W. P. Lemon and W. H. Henderson, Ministers
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
Mildred Beam, Church School Director
9:00 A.M.: Westminster Guild Seminar in Re-
ligion.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship with sermon by
Dr. Lemon. Topic will be "Man's Major
Search."
5:30 P.M.: Westminster Guild supper hour.
6:30 P.M.: Dr. W. P. Lemon will speak to the
Guild on 'An Estimate of Christian "Funda-
mentalism."
CHURCH OF CHRIST
210 N. Fourth Ave.
Y.M.C.A. Auditorium
Telephone Number: 2-6007
Sermon Subjects-
A.M.: "If a Man Die Shall He Live Again?"
P.M.: "Can One Be Saved Out Of The
Church?
Guest Speaker--Wheeler Utley.
l -.n-- r ^EMI~enf- A71fLE Al wlJkllu n

Hostel Club: Sun., April 23:
Meet at the League, 8 a.m. to drive
to Commerce Lake for a day of
canoeing. Bring lunch to cook out,
and canoe if have one. Otherwise
prepare to rent canoe. Call leader,
Bob Duval, by Fri., April 21, about
transportation by car and canoe.
Young Progressives of America:
Special membership meeting, 7:30
p.m., Mon., April 24, banning of
Phillips-Wernette debate.
Tuesday Play Reading Section
of the Faculty Women's Club: Last
meeting, 1:45 p.m., Tues., April 25,
League.

suits

checks and tweeds in navy,
beige, red, powder blue, and
grey . . . values to $59.95
.sizes 7-15, 8-18.
$35.00
better values in navy, red,
green, white, and pastels. ..
sizes 10-18

Kiddie
Matinee

1

-5

P.M.

toppers

General Admission
Free

$12.95 to $22.95

I

better
dresses

dressy
dresses

pure silk prints, shantungs
in navy, beige, and black
values $29.95 ...sizes
7-15, 10-18
$16.00
materials galore for day and
evening temperatures . . .
prints and colors . . . sizes
10-18, 7-15 . . . values to
$22.95
$11.00
plaids, checks, solids, and
pastels in sunbacks, short
sleeve, off - the - shoulder,
and other styles . .. cotton,
linens,. piques, chambrays,

Complete
C a rnival1

7-12

P.M.

Tickets on Diag
and at door

9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast, Canterbury House) .
9:45 A.M.: Church School, Grades 7, 8, 9.
11:00 A.M.: Church School, thru Grade 6.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rev.
Henry Lewis, S.T.D.
5:30 P.M.: Canterbury Club Buffet Supper and

summer
dresses

dotted swiss, batiste, and
voile.T. .715, 10-18

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