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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 20, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-04-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIDE MIC-1iGN DAIL'Y

OPEN WINDOW POLICY:
Spring Breezes
ThroughLibrary

By ROSEMARY OWEN
Spring air conquered the stale
fumes of steam heat in the Gen-
eral Library, as staffers opened the
windows to admit the balmy
breezes.
The musty aroma which had
brought forth many student com-
plaints was completely dispelled
when the arrival of Spring warmth
allowed librarians to break the
three month tradition of closed
windows.
* * *
THE CUSTOM of leaving the
windows closed followed a Plant
Department directive to conserve
coal by not allowing buildings to
cool off at any time.
Though the heat was still
pouring into the reading rooms
from the radiators, librarians
waged a vigorous battle to keep
the odor from becoming offen-
sive.
"If it's too hot, I'll open some
more windows," one staffer apolo-
gized.
STUDENTS WERE quick to re-
cognize that a new smell was in
the air, and signs of spring fever
could be seen throughout the
building.
In the reading rooms, sleepy
students snoozed over half-open
Obstetricians
To Meet Here
Michigan Society of Obstetri-
cians and Gynecologists will meet
today at the University.
Dean Albert Furstenberg of the
medical school will address the 175
members of the society. One of
five guest lecturers is Dr. George
Kamperman, emeritus chief of ob-
stetrics at Harper Hospital and
formerly of the University and
Wayne University.

texts, while graduate students in
the stacks carrells gazed long-
ingly out the window.
The library steps were occupied
all day by students who just stop-
ped to admire the day, in distinct
contrast to the pre-vacation per-
iod where the entrance-ways to the
library were as lonely a spot as
could be found.
Arts 'Union
Will Choose
New Heads
A new executive council will be
elected at the annual membership
meeting of the Inter-Arts Union
at 2 p.m. Saturday in the League.
Members of the IAU include
everyone who has worked on any
of the Inter-Arts projects this
year, Chuck Olsen, council mem-
ber said
* * *
COUNCIL. MEMBERS, elected
for year-long terms, act as co-
ordinaters of Inter-Arts activity,
Olsen explained.
To be sure that all of the
arts are represented, five mem-
bers are elected from each "in-
terest group." This provides for
students interested in music,
dance, acting and all other art
areas to choose their own repre-
sentatives, he said.
Inter-Arts officers are elected
by the Council from their member-
ship, in much the same way as
the Student Legislature Cabinet
is selected, he said.
* * *
DURING THE PAST year, the
Inter-Arts Union has produced
"Murder in the Cathedral," a bill
of one-acts, "Closed Session," and
"A Phoenix to Frequent." The IAU
formed and published "Genera-
tion," new campus art magazine,
and held a three day Student Art
Festival.
Plans for the remaining of the
semester call for a modern dance
festival featuring professional dan-
cers, Sunday night work-discus-
sion groups, and a Student Art
Exhibit which IAU will join the
National Student Association in
bringing to this campus.
Prof. Haber
Will Lecture
Prof. William Haber, of the
economics department, will speak
at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow at Hillel
Foundation on "Social Security:
American Pattern."
The lecture, which will follow
services at 7:30 p.m., is one of
the last in Hillel's "20th Century
Limited" discussion series. Prof.
Haber, who is also head of the
faculty Phoenix drive, is also a
former head of Refugee Service,
and was a special consultant to
Gen. Clay on the DP problem.

Elmer Davis'
To A ddress
Phi Betes
Elmer Davis, radio news.analyst,
will be the featured speaker at the
annual Phi Beta Kappa initiation
dinner 6:30 p.m. Saturday in the
League.
The dinner will bring~100 new
members into the national honor-
ary association.
INITIATES include eight ju-
niors, eight graduate students, sev-
eral students from the education
and music schools, and nearly 80
literary college seniors.
In addition to Davis' talk on
"The Scholar in 'a Time of
Peril," the group will hear Miss
Shirley Kallman, '50, speak in
behalf of the women initiates
and Paul Brentliger, '50, talk for
the men.
In addition to 11 years ex-
perience broadcasting news com-
mentaries, Davis has been an
author, journalist and critic. He
served for 10 years on the staff
of the New York Times and has
written many books, including a
"History of the New York Times."
DAVIS RECEIVED both B. A.
and M. A. degrees from Franklin'
College. In 1912 he was awarded
a Rhodes Scholarship, and stud-
ied at Queens College, Oxford Uni-
versity.
Saturday's banquet will mark
the 42nd annual Phi Beta Kappa
initiation. The University PBK
chapter was founded in 1917.

One of the nation's top bridge
players was honored last night at
the regular weekly bridge tourna-
ment in the Michigan Union ball-
room.
Mrs. Bernard Agruss, who has
taught student tournament parti-
cipants here for the past two
years, was presented with a sur-
prize $25 gift check from the Un-
ion Student Offices for her free
services.
* * *
SINCE SHE started supervising
tournaments at the Union, Mrs.
Agruss has developed intercolle-
giate teams here which have led
the country.'Under her guidance,
University teams in the past year
have won every intercollegiate
contest entered.

, Mrs. Agruss is the only woman
in Michigan to become a "life
master," which is the highest hon-
or accorded by the American Con-
tract Bridge League.
THE UNION tournaments held
every Wednesday are open to all
students, according to staffman
Dan Probert, '50E. From ten to 14
tables are set -up each week. Par-
ticipation costs $.35 and cash
prizes go to winners.
Profits are used to buy equip-
ment and to send outstanding
players to out-of-town contests.
This weekend, Milt Siegel and Dan
Babitch will represent the Univer-
sity at the National Intercollegiate
meet in Chicago.

GRAND SLAM:
Union Honors Instructor
Of Student Bridge Players

A

LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmnie /1u~t t Atce £! tud o-4
New beginning class for adults on Monday evenings.
Fox trot, waltz, rhumba and boogie.

PRIVATE LESSONS BY APP(
209 So. State St.

I NTMENT
Phone 8161

I

FIND OUT

Id

F IN D OU T
What TheseWings Can Meanto
YOUR

I

.l

REQUIREMENTS FOR OPTOMETRY
Five years of college work are re-
quiredfor the degree, Doctor of
Optometry.
The first year must be completed
in anaccredited college of arts and
sciences.
The second year also may be com-
pleted in such anrinstitution, or may
be taken at Chicago College of Op-
tometry.
Thethird, fourth and fifth years
are devoted to professional courses
which must be completed in an
accredited college of optometry.
Fall registration is now dpen at
Chicago College of Optometry, 350
Belden Ave., Chicago 14, Ill. Dormi-
tory acgommodations available on
the campus. The college is approved
for veterans.

v

TO DAY'S
SIPEC IAL
Special
from 5 to 7 P.M.
BAKED
MACARONI
AND CHEESE
Cole Slaw
Roll and Butter
Coffee or Tea
45c Special
MEAL TICKETS
on Sale
$5.00 value for $4.50

I

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tvkle

RESTAU RANT
ON THE CAMPUS
332 SO. STATE ST.

Announcing
STUDENT SHIPS
It's still possible to see
Europe this Summer
Dormitory (25 Berth) .. .
$135 one way
Tourist Cabins (4 Berth)
$140 one way
S.S. CANBERRA (Greek Line)
Montreal to Cherbourg &
Southhampton . .. 9 days
Depart MONTREAL
May 31 - June 26 - July 22
Depart SOUTHAMPTON &
CHERBOURG FOR MONTREAL
Aug. 3 - Aug. 29 - Sept. 24
Departures on other dates
available
Limited Space - Act Promptly
YOUTH ARGOSY, Inc.
366 Broadway Worth, 2-0162
New York 13, New York

I

#" il the MICHIGRAS
Merry-Go-Round
It's here again ... the giddiest, gaudiest
fun-fest of the year. EVERYONE'S in it!
PARADE FRIDAY 4 P.M.
Thrill Shows
Games
Comedy Acts
Freaks
EH Girlie Shows
Refreshments
Rides
7 P.M.-midnight, tomorrow and Saturday
me.. m- == Um Ua a m d

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I

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\

We have a large group of distinctive
Pins, Earrings, and Bracelets avail-
able for your selection . . . their

-~~~~%% va Ij ___ ,- . I

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Hill

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