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April 18, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-04-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"I

THE MICHMGAN)DIL

TUESDAY, APR I 18, 1956

_____________________________________________________________________ I ________________________ I

iblications
nploy Reds
Sys Budenz

MORE THAN EVER BEFORE:
Posters Sprout As Election Nears

By FLOYD' THOMAS
Special to The Daily1
NEWBERRY, Mich.-Some of
the leading publications opposing
the investigation of Communists
in the government have comnu-
nist cells among their employees,
Lous Budenz, former editor of the
Daily Worker, declared.
"These publications are at-
peasers," according to the key wit-
ness in the McCarthy-Lattimore
case. "They are miseducating the
American people."j
* * *
ONE SECTION of the press call-
ed the Hiss case "fantastic" and
will say the same about any simi-
lar case, Budenz said in a Daily
interview last Friday.1
"This part of the press shouts
'guilt by association,' but what
must we think of a man who be-
ngs to 28 Conununist fronts?"1
he asked. He did not say to whom
he referred.
Budenz, ex-Communist, refused
to comment directly on the charges'
of Sen. Joseph McCarthy (R-Wis.)
that Prof. Owen Lattimore, of
Johns Hopkins University, a State
Department adviser, is a Commu-
nist.
Budenz will testify before a Sen-1
ate investigating committee
Thursday.
ASKED IF he considered the
communist investigations a threat
to civil liberties, Budenz declared:
"The Communist party is not
a political organization; it is a
fifth column. Those who talk
about civil liberty for Coi-
itsmean liberty for treason.
Civil liberty ends where treason
begins. I favor outlawing the
Communist party."
Budenz said the Communist
party waged an intensive and suc-
cesful propaganda campaign to
ovince the publ, c that the Chi-
nese Communists were merely
"agrarian reformers" unconnected
With Moscow. This is the view Prof.
Lattimore is alleged to hold.
BUDENZ ADDED that the chief
instruments in this campaign were
the Institute of Pacific Relations,
headed by Frederick Field, "Amer-
asia" magazine, edited by convict-
edRussian agent James Jaffee,
and "China Today" magazine, run
l Field, Jaffee and one other
yi Bhudenz refused to name.
Yana ga Will
Discuss U. S.,
4dT,
Japan Today
Prof. Chitoshi Yanaga, of the
Yale University political science
department, will speak on "United
States and Japan" at 4:15 p.m. to-
d'y in Rackham Amphitheatre.
Appearing under the auspices
of the Department of Far Eastern
Languages and the University Cen-
ter for Japanese Studies, Prof.
Y_3anaga will discuss problems
growing out of the American oc-
cupation. His talk is open to the
public.
4: Author of the recently publish-
ed "Japan Since Perry," Prof. Ya-
naga is a guest lecturer this week
at the Center for Far Eastern
Studies.
Born and educated in the United
States, Prof. Yanaga served dur-
ing the war in the Office of War
Information, the Federal Com-
munications Commission and the
State Department.

Students Needed
At Voting Booths
More than 15 students are still
needed to man voting booths dur-
ing next week's all-campus elec-
tions, according to Jim Storrie,
'51, of the Student Legislature
citizenship committee.
"Pll-watchers" are especially
needed at 8 a.m. and 12 noon both
next Wednesday and Thursday,
and students who are willing to
work at those times should con-
tact the SL office immediately,
Storrie said.
Read Daily Classifieds
MARRIED
COLLEGE
GRADUATE
VETERANS
A lifcirvwn -nraa..+.mr a a t

House bulletin boards and local
store windows blossomed forth
with a new coating of election
posters yesterday as Studen Leg-
islature and class officer candi-
dates swung into their final inten-
sive campaigns before next week's
all-campus elections.
The posters, resplendent with
candid'ates' pictures and snappy
campaign slogans, range from
small handbills to huge, brightly-
colored cardboard posters.
A FEW female candidates have
even resorted to "cheese-cake"
photographs to catch the un-wary
male student's eye-and vote.
Local printers reported that
orders for campaign posters this
semester have been "even more
numerous than in previous
years."
One printer said that he has
been swamped with more than 25
poster orders and that "students'
requests are even more fantastic
than in other elections-if that's
possible."
Dave Belin, '51, chairman of the
SL citizenship committee, warned
candidates, however, that posters
may not be put up on University
or Arcade buildings, or on trees
and telephone poles.
* * *
"AN ANN ARBOR city ordi-
nance outlaws the posting of cam-
paign literature on trees or tele-
phone poles," Belin said, "and
violators of this ruling will be held
responsible to both the Legisla-
ture and to the municipal authori-
ties."1
Meanwhile, most SL hopefuls
have not beep limiting their
campaigning to mere poster cir-
culation. Betty Bridges, '52, di-
rector of the Legislature's pre-
election "open-house" program,
reported that candidates have
been flocking to the individual
house-sponsored c a m p a i g ui
meetings.

UN Observer
To Speak on
Atomic Age
Mrs. Theodore D. Walser, field
representative of the Women's In-
ternational League for Peace and
Freedom, and United Nations Ob-
server, will speak on "Conscience
in the Atomic Age" at 8 p.m. today
at the Memorial Christian Church.
Mrs. Walser, co-sponsored by
the Student Religious Association
and the Friends Service Commit-
tee, will also be available for per-
sonal interviews tomorrow after-
noon. She will speak to the Inter-
Cooperative Council at 6:15 p.m.
tomorrow on "Racial Under-
standing-An Ingredient of
Peace."
* * *
BORN IN Japan, Mrs. Walser
graduated from Smith College, and
returned to Tokyo after her mar-
riage with her husband to set up
a student center. While in Japan,
Mrs. Walser taught in three large
women's colleges, tutored the Em-
peror's cousins, and was president
of the International Women's Club
of Tokyo.
Mrs. Walser was also a mem-
ber of the League of Nations
Association, the Japan Women's
Peace Society, the Japan-Ameri-
can Association and president
of the Smith College Club of
Japan.
In 1942, after her return to the
U.S., Mrs. Walser was appointed
an accredited observer to the U.N.,
and was active in the Committee
of Women in World Affairs, the
Race Relations Committee of the
American Civil Liberties Union,
and Women United for the United
Nations.
MRS. WALSER has also served
on the faculty of the Institutes of
International Relations sponsor-
ed by the American Friends Ser-
vice Committee, and has twice
been delegate for the United States

i
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°' - - ,

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PERSONAL

k
iff

FOR SALE

10 MEALS FOR $4.99
The new "STREAMLINER" meal tick-
et gives you 5 lunches and 5 dinners
for only $4.99 at Club 211, 211 S. State.
Your ticket expires oniy when com-
pletely punched. Regular meal tick-
ets are still available. )2P

4.

LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209 S. State
Phone 8161

)1P

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
CAUGHT IN THE ACT-Betty Bridges, '52, (center) of the Stu-
dent Legislature citizenship committee warns candidates Jack
Arbuckle, '51, and Judy Sinclair, '52, to remove their posters from
the information desk in the lobby of the Administration Building.
Under Legislature and Ann Arbor regulations, campaign posters
may not be posted in University buildings or on trees and tele-
phone poles.

TRES DEL I CI EUX
or "BEST MEALS ON CAMPUS"
Have you tried the 39c luncheon at
J. D. Miller's Cafeteria, 211 S. State?
Entree, potato, vegetable, bread,
butterand beverage, all for only
39c. Try it today. ) 2P
HEY BEULAH-The bear's hibernating
but I'll see you at Michigras-Brod.
) 47P
' LOST & FOUND
LOST-Pr. blue rimmed glasses in royal
blue case near Washtenaw andS.
Univ.-in last 3 weeks. Plea~e call
Jo Bell 2-3159. )56L
LOST: Men's gold watch, April 6 at
State Theatre, men's washroom. Val-
ued as timekeeper and award. In-
quire: 1501 South Blvd., 2-7544. Re-
ward. _________)57L
LOST-Horn rimmed glasses in red
case. 2049 Stockwell. 3-1561. )25L
FOUND-Watch at Law Club Arch.
B21, Law Club. )58L
MISCELLANEOUS
GIRL WANTED to share small apart-
ment through August with University
employee. Prefer graduate student or
young business woman who doesn't
drink or smoke. Call 3-1169 between
6-7 evenings. )4M
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

PHILCO PORTABLE Phonograph. 78
RPM,_$20. Call Jane, 3-4354._ )84
1936 FORD TUDOR. Good motor, good
tires. 1950 plates. $125. Ph. 3-1811
after 1 p.m. )88
CAMERAS-Leica IIIc, F-2 summar,
case, $180. Contax I, F-2 Sonnar,
case, copy attachment $130; Exacta
B, film size 127, F 2.8 Tessar, F 5.5,
2X Meyer Telephoto $145. Ed Strong,
Ph. 2-0549. )87
NEW apartment size, Spin Dry wash-
er $20. John Dunn, 38740. )86
CANARIES, Beautiful singers and fe-
males. Parakeets and Finches. Bird
Supplies and cages. Birds Boarded.
Ruffins' Melody Bird Shop. 526 S.
Seventh. )2B
MOTORCYCLE, 1947 Indian, 74cc. Black
}White Buddy Seat, Saddle Bags,
Windshield. 5000 Miles. Ph. 2-8783. )85
RALPH GULDAHL matched golf set.
4 reg. irons, 2 woods. Never used. $26.-
45. Chas. White. Law Club. 3-4145. )66
U.S. NAVY "T" SHIRTS-45c; 100%
wool athletic hose, 49c; Gabardine
pants, $5.35; Gabardine sport shirts,
$2.99; Open 'til 6 p.m. Sam's Store,
122 E. Washington. ~)a5
TWO UNDERWOOD portable typewrit-
ers, excellent condition. Ph. 6427. ) 89
1950 ENGLISH motorcycles $280 up.
India M/C Sales, 207 W. Liberty.
Phone 2-1748._Open evenings. )83
NEW SPECIAL OFFER-78 weeks of
TIME for only $6.87. New subscrip-
tions only. Phone Student Periodical
Agency, 2-8242. )2
3 SPEED ENGLISH LIGHTWEIGHTS.
$47.50. PARTS AND ACCESSORIES.
Student Bicycle Agency, 629 E. Univ.
77
WOMAN'S riding boots size 8%. Ex-
cellent condition. Phone 8539 after
5:00. ) 80
BUSINESS
SERVICES
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist in
Hopwood, Master's and Doctor's man-
uscripts and legal work. Phone 2-9848
after noon. ) 30B
TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales and Service
MORRILL'S-314 S. State St. )11B
TYPING-Reasonable rates. Accurate
_work. Phone 3-4040. )25B
HAVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Office Equipment Service Company.
215 E. Liberty. )

BUSINESS SERVICES
HILDEGARDE SHOPPE
109 E. Washington
Expert Alterations
Custom Clothes
by Established Tradition )3B
WASHING, ironing done in my own
home. Also rough dry and wet wash-
ing.2Free pick up and delivery. Ph.
2-9020, )1B
HAVING A QUARE DANCE?
Need a caller?
Call Wayne Kuhns. 3-5806.
Rates to fit the party. )31B
DOES _JUNIOR keep you from going
out? Try a-reliable Baby Sitter. Kid-
die Kare, 3-1121. ) 10B
WANTED TO TRADE
IF OUR TASTES AGREE, let's swap
classical record albums. 2-7981. )17T
$arToN
HELP.
WANTED
DO YOU need any help? If so, you will
getgood resuls from a DAILY HELPI
WANTED ad. Try. it and see. )7P
WANTED: Male or Female retail shoe
clerk. Must have had vrevious shoe
fitting experience. Entire Summer
Vacation Employment if satisfactory.
Interested persons write giving length
of experience and references. FRIED-
RICH'S, "NORTHERN MICHIGAN'S
GREATEST SHOE STORE," TRAV-
ERSE CITY, MICHIGAN. )14H

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cLosET

ROOMS
FOR RENT

.8

* * *

* * *

Miss Bridges said that at least
two open-houses have been sche-
duled for every day until the elec-
tion and that the entire program
will conclude with a mass rally at
the West Quad next Tuesday, the
eve of the election.
* * *
ALTHOUGH no evidences of
mass independent or affiliated
"block-voting" plans have been

uncovered, several candidates have
reportedly been arranging to
"trade" second or third place vote
support with other candidates.
As yet, however, no lists or in-
dependent and affiliated candi-
dates have been circulated in stu-
dent residences as they have been
in previous election campaigns.
Francis To Speak
At Annual Meeting
Dr. Thomas Fl'ancis, Jr., chair-
man of the department of epide-
miology and professor in the medi-
cal school, will give the presiden-
tial address at the 34th annual
meeting of the American Asso-
ciation -of Immunologists today in
Atlantic City.

DOUBLE AND SINGLE room in new
home for business man or student.
Call after 5. Ph. 2-1820. )61R
SINGLE ROOM, man preferred. Phone
2-4239,_836 Brookwood.. d)60R
NEED private home accommodations
for May FestivaluandtCommencement?
Call 2-9850, Student Room Bureau.
12 Noon-1 P.M., 6-7 P.M. )63R
STUDENT LANDLORD. large double
$6. 2 double $4.50. For men. Near
Rackham. 120 N, Ingalls. Ph. 2-6644.
)62R
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTU N IT IES_
MEDICAL PERSONNEL
for medical and dental field.
408 Park Ave. Bldg.
WO 3579
DETROIT, MICHIGAN )1E

Forbid Red To Debate Here

(Continued from Page 1)

business administration schoolI
agreed to debate with Phillips.
Yesterday, Prof. Wernette said,
"I was glad to accept the invita-
tion to debate. I am strongly in
favor of capitalism and was will-
ing to speak up for it.
'I * *
AND DAVE FRASER, president
of the Michigan Forum committee
said that he was disappointed in
the decision of the committee and
that "it was not one you would
expect from one of the leading
universities in the country."
Meanwhile, several student
organizations joined in protest-
ing the decision.
The Association of Independent
men condemned the lecture com-
mittee's stand, calling it a "gross
insult to the intelligence of the
student body in that we feel that
our economic and social system
can stand on its merits in any de-
bate."
They were joined by the East
Quadrangle Council which passed
a resolution blasting the decision
as "degrading the University's
goals of academic freedom and
citizenship trining."
Movies are BETTER than ever!

AND the Student Legislature
cabinet, meeting yesterday, pre-
pared for a full scale discussion
of the action at the SL meeting
tomorrow. According to SL Presi-
dent Quent Nesbitt, the SL will
work out a general statement of
policy in regard to the Lecture
Committee decision. The SL may
ask for a meeting on the subject
between the cabinet and the Re-
gents.
The Michigan Forum com-
mittee will meet today to con-
sider the remnants of its pro-
posed debate. Committee Chair-
man Fraser was not sure yes-
terday just what course his
committee would now take.
* * *
FACULTY members contacted
for comment yesterday were in
general wary of being quoted on
the decision of the Lecture Coi-
mittee. It was clear that full in-
formation as to the action had not
circulated extensively among the
faculty.
The committee's decision was
similar to that of Wayne Uni-
versity's President, David- Hen-
ry, who two weeks ago denied
Phillips permission to speak at
the Detroit institution.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
NOW THRU SAT.
[J

f
2
i

to the International Congress
the WILPF, in 1946 and 1949.
Hopwood Entries
Due Tomorrow

of

The deadline for spring Hop-
wood contest entries is 4:30 p.m.
tomorrow, according to Prof. Roy

Other members of the School of W. Cowden, Hopwood Director.
Public Health attending the meet- Manuscripts submitted will be
ing are: Dr. Gordon C. Brown, judged for major and minor Hop-
who will present a paper on Polio- wood awards in drama, poetry,
myelitis, Dr. J. Joe Quilligan, and essay and fiction. They should be
Dr. Fred M. Davenport. delivered to Rm. 3221 Angell Hall.

'

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lk

No. Main -- Opp. Court House
- ENDS TONITE -
RODDY McDOWALL
"BLACK MIDNIGHT"
Plus
KENT TAYLOR
"WESTERN PACIFIC
AGENT"
"' Phone 5651

STARTS WEDNESDAY
Thru Friday
Mat. 30c, Nights & Sun. 40c
CHARLES STARRETT
"TRAIL OF THE
RUSTLERS"
Plus
DONALD WOODS
"BARBARY PIRATE"

MAIL ORDERS NOW!
Department of Speech presents
MOLI ERE'S
"SHOLFOR ]IUSBA.0NIJS"
A Hilarious Comic-Satire
Adaptation by Guiterman & Langer
Wednesday thru Saturday
April 26-27-28-29th .... 8 P.M.
ADMISSIONS $1.20 - 90e - 60e (Tax Inel.)
STUDENT RATES Wed. & Thurs. 48e
Box Office Opens Monday, April 24 10-5 Daily
Phone 6300
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
.......:-..,. :::.v.:.::
.. . . v ".":.v ; ...fi ::.,k...,' ...,. ....::. :::::w ::: ::. :::::: v..... ....... ...... ....-........'.. ...

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FRIDAY

"A TALE OF ILLICIT LOVE!"--sua
10ON N

"Dares tw~deal
with themes
forbidden."
--World-
Telegram

a.

L..AM.s

TODAY WED. & THURS.
HE FOUND HIMSELF PLAYING
WITH -FIRE.. .the 'kind of fire
that catches on and burns
ianur. .

WHAT A CHASE HE LED THEM!

Critical acclaim
of the 3rd Man
is unprecedented!

A.

1!

i

gpoke Ju9 Coffee -£-waA op
1204 South University
serving
BREAKFASTS, LUNCHEONS and DINNERS
SANDWICHES and SALADS
from__
7:00 A.M. to 1 :00 P.M. and 5:00 P.M. to 7 P.M.
Closed Sundays

DAVID 0. SELZNICK and ALEXANDER KORDA
present

,

;.": ;starring
Farley Granger
Charles Bickford
Shown at and introdudng
1:30 - 4:15
7:05 - 9:55 Joan Evans
PLUS
SMASHING
THE WORLD'S'
MOST vicious

I

I1

M. IXThru the twisting labyrinth of
the shadowy city they hunted
him ,. . the men who sought
his life ...and the woman who
sought his love.
STARRNG
JOS*EPH GOTTEN,
VA LLL ORSON 'LLE[S

..

hear the magic trngers *

1

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AN NO .AOIO 9Plrf-XI I'I(i
.. A .4E S Y A

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