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April 04, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUE.SDAY,,APIUL C USC

TUESDAY. APRIL 4.. T§'~O

.:

,;

ARRISTERS-TO-BE:
Michigan Crib Boasts
700-Years-Old Name

By RON WATTS
Seven centuries is a long way to
back in choosing a name, but
e Michigan Crib did it and are
her proud of the results.
The Crib, which had its begin-
ig in 1948 with the aid of Dean
Blythe Stason of the law school,
>se its name from the termino-
y used by the barristers of the
irteenth century. Crib refers to
inclosure in which young ap-
ntice lawyers of that period
and observed the proceedings
the court.
* * *
AN MACDONALD, '50, presi-
it of the group, remarked that
meaning of the name is so
le known that "pre-law" is re-
red after the name when an-
incements of activities are
,de in the DOB.
"The purpose of the group is
i prepare the students for law
hool training, MacDonald re-
arked. "The Crib which meets
ery two weeks invites special-
ts in law to speak from time to
me, take trips to local and De-
oit courts and hold discussions
various phases of law and law
hool information.
VlacDonald pointed out that at
,sent Duke University is "the only

other place to their knowledge that
had a pre-law group.
THE MAJORITY of former Crib
members have gone on to the Uni-
versity law school here, MacDonald
said. At least two thirds of the
members have entered some law
school," he added.
"This is by no means an organi-
zation of men," MacDonald em-
phasized. "The fact that out of the
60 members, three of our officers
are women seem to prove they are
the movers."
BusAd Grants
Scholarships
Scholarships have been awarded
to 18 students in the Business Ad-
ministration School.
The Business Administration
Real Estate Scholarship w a s
awarded to Leo. R. Russ, '50BAd.,
and a University Scholarship in
Professional Schools to Douglas
M. Jeannero, '5iBAd.
General University Scholarships
were received by: Harmon Blossey,
'50BAd., Morris H. Caminer, Grad.
BAd., Lois M. Crontwright, '51
BAd., Richard J. Janes, '50BAd.,
Harry A. Krater, '51BAd., Joseph
Levy, '51BAd., Robert L. McCol-
ley, '51BAd. and Maynard Miller,
'5 -BAd.
Others included Jacobo M. Per-
ou, '50BAd., Lee B. Porter, Gordon
W. Reitz, Thomas I. Slager, '51
BAd., John W. Stone, '50, Eliza-
beth J. Swift, Grad.-BAd., William
Van Lopik, '50BAd. and Frederick
W. White, Grad.-BAd.
NSA Scholarship
Petitions Available
The Student Legislature Cabinet
yesterday extended petitioning for
five NSA scholarships to the an-
nual Summer Institute for Social
Progress, which will be held from
July 1 to 15 on the Wellesley Col-
lege campus.
Students still interested in ap-
plying for the Summer Institute
scholarships should contact the SL
office for further information by
5 p.m. tomorrow,I

p

LINO
LEN

Fellowships
Named by
GradSchool
Awards To Take
Effect Next Fall
Dean Ralph A. Sawyer of the
graduate school has announced
the University fellowship and gra-
duate scilarhip appointments
for 1950-1951.
The awards are granted to stu-
dents of high scholastic standing
from universities and colleges
throughout the United States and
Canada, and will become effective
in September, 1950.
THOSE RECEIVING Horace H.
Rackham Predoctoral Fellowships
are:
George A. Austin, Howard
A. Crum, Betty L. Fladeland, Ro-
land H. Good, Jr., Emma H. Mel-
lencamp, Lynn R. Peters, Howard
Raiffa, Ruth Riemer, Kenneth G.
Wilson and Charles A. Yager.
Horace H. Rackham Special
Fellowships:
Lawrence S. Bartell, John L.
Boland, Jr., Harry Frederick Bru-
baker, Ralph F. Carl, Carl H.
Chapman, Bruce Kern Nelson,
Robert Eugene Newton and Ed-
ward Earl Sturgeon.
UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS:
Marguerite P. Arozian, Walter
S. Avis, Joseph A. Baclawski,
Humberto Jaun Benet, Russell E.
Bidlack, Joyce A. Bohyer, George
E. Bradley, Robert Lundquist
Chapman, Samuel K. Clark, John
R. Davies, Morton L. Davis, Don-
ald E. DeGraaf.
Frederik deWit, Anastuasius
Dontas, Arthur C. Downing, I-
Ming Feng, William H. Fern, Ken-
neth A. Fowler, Lenore Frane,
Louise L. Goss, Norman N. Greene,
Alice R. Hershenhart and William
R. Kiessel.
David Luce, Paul R. McIsaac,
Melvin M. Marcus, Charles Y.
Nakamura, Thomas W. Ross,
Richard A. Scott, Patarasp R.
Sethna, Pritam Singh, Albert
Steigerwalt, Jr., Olin J. Storvick,
Richard Strong, James E. Sulli-
van.
Harrison B. Tordoff, ,David W.
Varley, Alberto Villalon-Galda-,
mes, Stewart R. Wallace, Mary C.
Walsh, Frank E. Webb, Neil J.
Weller, Ernest D. Wenrick and
Edward E. Zukoski.
TUITION SCHOLARSHIPS:
Eugene S. Boyd, Mary F. Pityn-
ski, Kuo-P'ing Chou, John I.
Christiansen. Theodore Delevor-
yas, Howard M. Downs, Mildred K.
Ellis, Gerald G. Gibson, Henry W.
Habgood, Ian Halliday, Ralph J.
Hansen, Jr., Hans Heilbronner,
Myron J. Hclfgott, Richard M.
Herson, William E. Jenner.
Alice M. Kiefer, Philip Koch,
Bruce W. Love, William M. Ma-
Donald, Walter M. McLeish, Mi-
chael K. Macklei, William M.
Masters, Leonard E. Mortensn,
Robert G. Ragsdale, Jr., Stanley
Seltzer, Carl L. Shermer, William
G. Simeral.
Richard L. Simpson, Melbourne
G. Stewart, Wiliam O. Tower, Al-
bert Tsugawa, Robert W. Westrup,
John A. Whitcombe and Laura D.
Winchester.* * *
STATE COLLEGE SCHOLAR-
SHIPS.
Richard G. Rust, Daniel B. Har-
rington, Gloria B. Anderson, The-
resa F. Schaub, Cornelius Ren-
senbrink, Mark H. Ely, Roy A.
Jorgenson, Jr., John R. Berger,

John H. Ryskamp, Donald M. Pol-
lie, Rosemary T. Harbrecht, John
P. Evans, Dorothy H. Smith.
John C. Noell, Rosemary Euth,
James H. Nrothey, Richard B.
Barton, Mary E. Schneider, Wil-
lam A. Bezaire, John M. Gai-
mett and John S. Jarsma.
Special Fellowships:
Joshua Chover, William H. Kin-
caid, Charles A. Nichols, Cath-
rine A. Cole, Frank M. Lemp, Rob-
ert N. Mooney, Myrtle Soles, Dana
Paul Snyder and F. Gerard
Adams, Seymour Amlen, Howard
J. Koop.
Esther Cichipinti, Samuel A.
Pratt, Anton A. Pritchard, Fred-
erick L. Crane, Avery H. Gallup,
John F. Huntley, William J.
Reid, Harley Y. Jenning, Jr.,
Charles R. Vail, Elnora M. Dra-
fahl, Gloria J. Hile and William
G. Sinnigen.

YP-Sponsored Poll Discloses
Anderson House Peace Attitude

Results of a peace ballot taken
recently in Anderson House re-
vealed that the majority of the
men polled are in favor of imme-
diate negotiations between the
United States and Soviet Russia,
but are opposed to outlawing the
hydrogen bomb.
The poll was conducted by the
Young Progressives among stu-
dents in their rooms, in lounges
and in the study room. Out of the
140 men living in the house, 96
cast ballots.
The results in detail were as
follows.
1. Do you think steps should be
taken by Congress for the eventual
outlawing of the hydrogen bomb?
I-

Yes-36 (37.4%); No-51 (53.1
%); No opinion-9 (9.4%)
2. Do you favor immediate top
level negotiations between the
United States and Soviet Russia
in order to reach agreement and
understanding on major ,differ-
ences?
Yes-64 (66.7%); No-26 (27.1
%); No opinion'-6 (6.2%)
Gordon MacDougall, president
of the YP's, called the results of
the second question an "indirect
slap at bi-partisan foreign policy
and Acheson's refusal to meet
with Soviet leaders.
Read Daily Classifieds

-4

-DaJUy-AlanR ed
BOTTOMS UP-Two acrobatic students walk upside-down for the benefit of lunch-bound onlookers
at noon yesterday on the Diag. Accompanied by a group of drummers, the clowns were publicizing
the coming of Michigras to campus April 21 and 22.
Clowns' Capers Herald Carnival

A raucous platoon of drummers that the Burlesque, with its slogan
and gaily-dressed clows converged of "50 beautful girls and 49 beau-
on the Diag at high noon yester- tiful costumes" will probably be
day to herald the coming of Mich- rivaled in popularity by Martha
igras. Cook's "Pig Alley-an expose of
Juggling and performing hand- French night life."
stands to the beat of five borrow- Preceding the carnival will be
ed snares and a base drum, the a comedy parade April 21 com-
performers offered a hint of the - -----
carnival atmosphere expected to
engulf the campus when the tra-
ditional show arrives April 21 and
2. * * * ISt1op inan
AFTER COLLECTING a fair-
sized crowd the group marched off
toward Engine Arch, bearing highH
a coffin housing the lifeless body T HE
of a man "who didn't go to Michi-
gras."OFFICIAL

plete with bands, huge balloons,
a calliope and floats decked out
in hilarious attire.
Floats will portray the capers of
well-know characters from movies
and cartoons. The "Keystone
Cops" will be on hand as well as
Tarzen, Denny Dimwit and others.

A
&

-4

4.

i

61

ITit

on/l

Ask any old grad,
He'll tell you he had

Meanwhile, Bill Peterson, '51,
Michigras co-chairman, de-
lightfully noted mounting stu-
dent enthusiasm for the bi-an-
nuat affair. "House groups all
over campus are hard at work
on parade floats and carnival
booths," he observed.
More than 44 of the booths will
line Yost Field House during the
two-night stand the week follow-
ing spring vacation. Booths will
house everything from a base-ball
throw at "dirty communists" to
the Beta Theta Pi Burlesque.
*. * *

MICHIGAN
RING

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