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February 15, 1950 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WON'T PREDICT
Professors C
By BOB KEITH
Three political science depart-
ment men who are specialists in
British government and election
procedure will fly to England to-
day to observe and survey the Bri-
tish general elections.
Department Chairman James
K. Pollock, Prof. Samuel J. Elder-
sveld and Prof. Lionel H. Laing
will make the two-week trip to get
an on-the-spot view of the vot-
ing which takes place Feb. 23.
THEY WILL TRAVEL through
Britain as much as possible, ob-
serving campaign strategy, elec-
tion literature and the reactions
of the British people.
The voting will determine
whether Great Britain will have
a, possible five more years of
Labor Party Socialist rule or will
swing back to Winston Church-
ill and the Conservative Party.
Prof. Pollock called the elec-.
tion "one of the most critical in
the post-war period." He declined
to predict the outcome because of
certain imponderable factors such
as the effect of Britain's multiple'
party system.
"A BRITISH election is one of
the greatest events to behold in
the whole democratic world," Prof.
Pollock added.
The election was characteriz-
ed as a "complete toss-up" by
Prof. Eldersveld. The latest op-
inion surveys indicate it will be
very close, he said.
Granted special leave by the
University, the three men will be
sponsored by a private foundation

OUTCOME: OeOtist
yo To View British Elecions To iscuss
'OHS To Discu
*egr*A *r *

ACTIVE ALPHABETS:
'U' Political .ops Plan Busy Season

TRAVELING EDUCATORS-Political science Professors Samuel
J. Eldersveld, James K. Pollock, department chairman, and Lionel
H. Laing (from left to right) pose for a pre-flight picture. They
take off today for a two-week stay in England where they will

observe the impending elections.
* * *
which Prof. Pollock did not iden-
tify more specifically.
They left Ann Arbor by train'
yesterday and will go to England'
by plane from New York today.
They plan to return to this coun-
try about a week after the elec-
tion.
PROF. POLLOCK, who was re-
cently elected president of the
American Political Science Asso-
ciation, is widely known for his
work as an advisor to the Amer-
ican Military Government in Ger-
many and as a member of the
Hoover Commission on U.S. gov-
ernment reorganization.

Prof. Laing's special field is Bri-
tish government. Prof. Eldersveld's
specialty is political parties and
voting behavior.
IAU Presents
Sartre'sPlay
The Inter-Arts Union is pre-
senting "Closed Session," a newl
translation of Jean-Paul Sartre's
"Huis Clos," at 8 p.m. today andI
tomorrow at the University High
School Auditorium.
The show, which opened Tues-'
day night, is a psycholological
study of three people locked in a
room in Hades. Prof. Marvin Fel-
heim, of the English department,
is responsible for this new trans-
lation of Sartre's play, presented
about two years ago on Broadway
as "No Exit."
* * *

Oliver La Grone, noted sculptor
and poet, will speak on "The Ne-
gro in American Culture" at 4 p.m.
tomorrow at Lane Hall.
His talk, which is sponsored by
Student Religious Association and
Inter-Racial Association, is part
of a campus program to commem-
orate Negro History Week, Feb.
12 to 19.
* * *
LA GRONE, who was film direc-
tor of the UAW for several years,
has made frequent talks on the
topic of Negro contributions to
American culture, especially on
campuses throughout the country.
He has just completed a new
book of poetry, "Footfalls," from
which he will read some selec-
tions.
The program will continue Fri-
day with a party and a movie on
Negro History Week at 7:45 p.m.
in the League, sponsored by the
Young Progressives. Another film
will be shown at 8 p.m. Saturday
in Lane Hall.
* * *
CONCLUDING THE program
Sunday night, the cooperative
houses and Negro fraternities and
sororities will sponsor a speaker
on Negro History Week.
Founded 25 years ago by histor-'
ian Carter G. Woodson, Negro
History Week emphasizes the con-
tributions of Negroes to American
culture and history.
Call Campus'
Debut Success
First issue of "Campus," new
pictorial magazine,, received a
"very good response," according to
Al Forman, '50E, editor.
Although final figures are not
yet available, Forman estimates
circulation of the Feb. 8 "Campus"
at 2,000.
"The main criticism is that
there wasn't enough of it," For-
man said. "For this reason the
will size will be increased from 24
to 28 pages in the Feb. 24 issue."
"Also in response to criticism,
the next "Campus" will have more
printed material and will be more
compact," Forman said. "Improve-
ments have been made in printing
and layout."
The Feb. 24 issue will be on sale
on campus and in newsstands and

Campus political and alphabet
groups are planning a busy semes-
ter of activities only slightly dim-
med by the absence of state and
national elections.
The Young Republicans will
push their "opportunity state" t
platform. Copies will be distribut-
ed to every Republican Senator
and Representative as well as Re-
publican national committeemen,
and state chairmen.
* * *
YR ALSO PLANS a Big Ten
Young Republican Conference to
be held here March 24 and 25.
In April the YR's plan to
bring candidates for the pri-
maries to speak on campus.
The group is also considering
the possibility of a series of
open forums on leading politi-
cal issues, which it would co-
sponsor with the Young Demo-
crats.
Floyd Marks, president of the
YD's announced that the group
"is going to spend all its time and
resources to help develop a politi-
cal attitude among students on1
campus."
* * *
HE EXPLAINED that because
this school year is an off year in
elections, the YD's plan to work
on a program emphasizing im-
provement of the campus in gen-
eral.
Anti-discrimination work will
continue to be the main point in

the Young Progressive's spring
program, Gordan MacDougall,
YP president, said. The group
plans to send a lobby to Lan-
sing in April.
Meetings of the State Student
Council of Young Progressives,
consisting of YP groups at Wayne
University, Michigan State Col-
lege, and the University, will be
held on campus in alternation
with the other two campuses.
THE COMMITTEE to End Dis-
crimination will concentrate its
spring program on working to
eliminate discriminatory ques-
tions from medical school appli-
cation blanks. Immediate efforts
of the CED are being centered on
its current petition campaign.
CED also hopes to start a ser-
ies of coffee hours at which pro-
fessors as guests would speak
pro and con on .various issues.
Students for Democratic Ac-
tion will present a series of pro-
gram speakers on issues that seem
likely to come up in the fall elec-
tions. Chief emphasis of the group
will be on planning summer study
trips abroad.
* * *
UNITED WORLD Federalists
have planned a program of open
meetings, talks before political sci-
ence classes, speakers' bureaus,
movies, and distribution of litera-
ture to make the campus more

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The three leads are played by
Len Rosenson, Bette Ellis, and
Joyce Edgar. All three are veter-
ans of the recent Inter-Arts pro-
duction, "Murder in the Cathe-
dral."
Rosenson, in addition to playing
in student shows, has toured!
Europe and done professional
work on and off Broadway. He
appeared in New York in "Mister
Roberts."
The entire production of "Clos-
ed Session" is under the direction
of Strowan Robertson. Herman
Baker designed the set and Jo-
seph Roberts, the costumes.
Tickets will be on sale from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. today and tomor-
row in the League lobby and at
the door of the Auditorium. All
seats are unreserved.
Haberdashers
To HoldClinic
Prof. Paul M. McCracken, of the
Business Administration School,
will outline the "Business Outlook
for 1950" at 2 p.m. tomorrow for
more than 150 men's clothiers at-
tending a Spring Clinic in Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
Highlights in the new styles for
spring and summer will be mod-
eled by students, at a 7:30 p.m.
show, which is open to the public.I

i

will feature stories on the parking
problem, campus chefs and Mich-
ingan artists, according to For-
man.
Cyrano' Tryouts
To Be HeldToday
Tryouts for the acting and pro-
duction staffs of the Theatre
Guild's. production of "Cyrano de
Bergerac" will be held at 7:30 p.m.
today in the League, Guild Presi-
dent Mark L. Harris, '50, announ-
ced yesterday.
The play by Edmond Rostand
will be presented April 28 and 29
in Pattengill Auditorium by the
organization. Last December the
group produced an un-cut version
of Shakespeare's "Rmoeo and Ju-
liet."

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aI XL Los Angeles, Calif., No. 135
In Los Angeles, there is always a friendly
gathering of University of Southern California
students at Ted Owen's. And, as in colleges
everywhere, ice-cold Coca-Cola helps make
these get-to-gethers something to remenbher. As
a refreshing pause from the study grind, or on
a Saturday-night date-Coke belongs.

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