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March 24, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MIiCHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MARCH 24, 1950

_

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het To Open
ext We
Leaders in World
Peace To Speak
James T. Shotwell, president of
e Carnegie Endowment for In-
rnational Peace, will highlight
list of world speakers at the third
nual conference of the Ameri-
n Association of International
elations Clubs, to be held here
hursday through Sunday. -
More than 300 delegates from
gional clubs all over the nation
ll meet at the University to lis-
n to leading international auth-
ities on world peace, and to com-
re their separate operational
ans.
* * *
THE OPENING luncheon meet-
g Thursday will feature a wel-
me address by James P. Adams,
ovost of the University, and a
1k by Miss Mary Shadow of the
mnessee State Legislature.

JESSE RIDES AGAIN:
Desperado Said To Be'U' Alumnus

By PAUL BRENTLINGER
Jesse James may have attended
the University's Law School.
At least, that's what the casual
reader of the book "Jesse James
Rides Again" might be led to be-
lieve.
According to this book, written
by Frank Hall and Lindsey Whit-
ten, "Jesse James was very suc-
cessful as a soldier of fortune be-
cause of his education. Few peo-
ple knew that he was a college
graduate with a law degree. Al-
Engiiieers 1In
Record Race
New Collection Used
By Many Students
Engineers apparently have more
culturecthan someiLSA students
would care to admit.
Or so it seems from figures re-
leased by the Circulation Depart-
ment of the General Library,
which tell how many students
from the different schools of the
University used the new record
library during the first two weeks
of its existence.
' * * *

though he never actually prac-
ticed law, he was graduated with
honors at Ann Arbor, Michign."
* * *
"JESSE JAMES Rides Again," a
modest biography of the notor-
ious train robber, was acquired
last summer by Jim Hemming,
Grad., in Missouri. It was pub-
lished by a Lawton, Okla. pub-
lisher in 1948, according to Hem-
ming.
While in Missouri, Hemming
visited J. Frank Dalton, 102
years old, who achieved nation-
al prominence recently by bring-
ing action in a Missouri circuit
court for the right to use the
name Jesse James. Dalton claims
that he is the true Jesse.
The aged Missourian also told
Hemming many tales of experi-
ences he had in Detroit and other
Michigan cities in his younger
days.

GOING BACK to the book, it
continues by saying that Jesse
"went to school" before his re-
ported death. This was during the
1870's after he had served for a
period in the Texas Rangers. His
ranger captain encouraged him to
attend a college and suggested the
Michigan institution.
"Attending under an assumed
name, Jesse first started study-
ing medicine." Because he
couldn't stand the sight of
blood, "after a year he trans-
ferred to the school of law."
A check with the catalogue of-
fice in Alumni Memorial Hall re-
vealed that the alumni -associa-
tion has no record of either a
Jesse James or a J. Frank Dalton,
as ever having been a student at
the University. Of course, the fam-
ed renegade might have used an
assumed name; as the book sug-
gested.

roundtable on the atomic en-
problem will take the spot-
t Friday. Speakers in the dis-
ion will be Dean L. N. Ride-
r of the University of Illinois
duate School Dean R. A. Saw-
of the University's Graduate
0ol. Shotwell will act as chair-
the all-conference dinner
irday night the chief problems
Europe will be discussed.
isiness meetings and commis-
meetings will fill in the gaps
reen the general assemblies.
QUIREMENTS FOR OPTOMETRY
4ve years of college work are re-
red for the degree, Doctor of
tometry.
he first year must be completed
an accredited college of arts and
ences.
he second year also may be com-
ted in such an institution, or may
taken at Chicago College of Op-
aetry.
he third, fourth and fifth years
devoted to professional courses
ich must 'be completed in an
redited college of optometry.
all registration isnow open at
cago College of Optometry, 350
den Ave., Chicago 14, Ill. Dormi-
Y accommodations available on
campus. The college is approved
veterans.

i

MUSIC MODERNE:
Jazz Platters Spin Weekly
As Boppers PlayFavorites

ACCORDING to Fred Dimock,
director of the Circulation De-
partment, tabs were kept on who
took out the records in order to
find out if students from any one
school monopolized the facility.
Although English concen-
trates led the field by a small
margin, the number of engineers
followed close after, proving,
according to one erudite en-
gineer, that many devotees of
the triangle and T-square are
not as anti-aesthetic as they
are made out to be.
The total number of students
borrowing records during the first
two weeks was 126, with practical-
ly every school of the University
represented.
"We are satisfied that the use
of the records is being spread well
al over campus," Dimock de-
clared.

By HERB CHESTON
"Boppers" and "Molde Olde
Figges," the lovers of jazz music,
have kept the beat of "Hot Music"
going, as the Hot Record Society
enters its fourth year, on campus.
Organized to further the ad-
vancement of "modern beat" and
provide intellectual exchange'
among jazz music fans the group
'U' Production
Names Cast
Of 'KingLear'
All but two of the main charac-
ters of "King Lear" are scheduled
to die March 29 through April 1
on the stage of Lydia Mendelssohn
theatre.
Death from rapier wounds and
broken hearts, as well as eye-
gouging and madness will all be
part of an evening's work for the
cast of the Speech department's
latest production. The actors,
however, will only suffer emo-

meets every week on Sunday night
for a jazz concert in the League
ballroom.
Members contribute their rar-
est and best recordings and the
concert continues on into the
night, until discs or audience give
out.
ONCE-A-MONTH live sessions
are given featuring "Lord Carl-
tons Swing Sextet," "Hugh Jack-
sons Boptet" and "Bob Leopolds
Dixieland Group." The live ses-
sions are attended by almost 200
persons.
In addition to the concerts
the society has set up contacts
with record dealers in Europe
for hard-to-get, and out-of-date
issues, unobtainable in the Unit-
ed States. Exchange devalua-
tions have reduced the cost of
these discs to their American
equivalents.
At 9:30 every Monday night the
Hot Record Society goes on radio
station WHRV, to bring to the
listening public a collection of
rare jazz items, in disc jockey
fashion, comments included.
* *, * -

Science, Art
Conference
OpensToday
More than 250 scientists, artists,
philosophers and writers des-
cend on campus today and tomor-
row for the 54th Annual Meeting
of the Michigan Academy of Sci-
ence, Arts and Letters.
The Academy, an affiliation of
I the American Association for the
advancement of Science, will fea-
ture two lectures and 237 papers
from individual members in 18
fields ranging from anthropology
to zoology, and titled everything
fromh "Cultural Anthropology and
Television" to "Four Squares."
* * *
THE MEETING will also serve
as a central depot for thesex-
change of ideas and works of the
Academy.
Keynote lecture will be "A
Limnological View of the Inland
Waters of Michigan," by Prof.
Paul S. Welch of the zoology de-
partment and president of the
Academy, at 8 p.m. today at the
Rackham Amphitheatre.
A special lecture will be at 4:30
p.m., today also at the Rackham
amphitheatre, entitled "The Pro-
motion of Beauty, an Essential
Element of Wise Living," by Gil-
more D. Clarke, dean of the archi-
tecture school at Cornell Univer-
sity.
IN CONNECTION with the
meeting, work of Academy mem-
bers in the fine arts section will be
on display in the exhibition rooms
of the Rackham Building.
A special display of work by
landscape architects of the Aca-
demy is on display in the lobby of
the Architecture Building.
Among the displays is a model
of the nearly completed St. Clair
Beach near Mt. Clemens, Michi-
gan. A $6,000,000 project, the beach
contains a mile and a quarter of
beach, an athletic department,
boating lagoon and parking space
for 10,000 cars.
Foresters To Aid
HelsinkiLibrary
Joining an American Forestry
Association drive to rebuild the
destroyed and depleted forestry li-
braries in devastated countries, the
Michigan Foresters' Club laid
plans last night to aid the Uni-
versity' at Helsinki, Finland.
Books and funds will be soli-
cited from alumni and students of
the forestry school, authors of
various technical publications, lo-
cal bookstores and government
agencies.

THE INTERVIEWS will be
by the Cabinet from 7 to 10
Monday and Tuesday at
Union.

More than 15 students seeking
seats on the University's dele-
gation to the annual National Stu-
dent Association Congress here in
Ann Arbor next August have
signed up for interviews with the
Student Legislature Cabinet, ac-
cording to Dorianne Zipperstein,
'51, chairman of the local NSA
committee.
Miss Zipperstein emphasized,
however, thatrstudents who wish
to be interviewed for one of the
14 delegate and alternate posi-
tions may still sign up from 3 to
5 p.m. today at the SL office in
the Office of Student Affairs.
* ,, * *

Although the delegates will'

be selected partially on the basis
of an applicant's knowledge of.
SL and the local NSA commit-
tee, Miss Zipperstein urged all
students to petition "regardless
of their background in campus
activities."
"We're. especially anxious to
have a delegation which is truly
representative of° all University
students and if an applicant has
had no previous experience with
NSA we will make special back-
ground material available to
him," she said.
Built around the theme of "The
Role of the Student in the Edu-
cational Community," the Con-
gres will bring hundreds of dele-
gates from colleges and univer-
sities all over the country to Ann
Arbor to discuss student problems
and set NSA policy.

m. today at Hillel Foundation.

4p
}

STILL TIME TO SIGN:
SL Cabinet To Conduct
NSA Meet Intev-ew

v

'U' Debaters
To Start Ohio
CollegeTour
The University debating squad
will start a one week tour of ver-
bal battles with Ohio colleges and
universities when it meets Bowl-
ing Green State Monday.
Debates with Heidelberg, Wes-
tern Reserve, Kent State and Den-
ison round out the week's schedule.
Those making the tour are Vic-
tor Gladstone, '53, Alan Kidston,
'52, John Madden and Thomas
Murray. They will be accompan-
ied by Raymond Nadeau, debate
coach.
Fireside Series
Dr. Ralph Rabinovitch, chief of
Children's Service, of the Neuro-
Psychiatric Institute of University
hospital will discuss the "Child
is the Father of Man" in the fifth
of the "Twentieth Century Un-
limited" fireside series at 8:30 p.
Im. today at Hillel Foundation.

A

held
p.m.
the

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FULL OF ENERGY-
AND 50 SWEET-

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at all leadi
candy con

TOOTSIE ROLL'S
E SNACK TO EAT!
ing
nters
Moak.

tionally in what is considered ON OCCASION they form a
Shakespeare's most calamitous radio-panel to discuss jazz music
production. forms and terminology, and their
* * * merits.
KING LEAR, a petulant, iras- A wide variety of collections
cible, but kindly 80 year old Bri- that members own, ranging from
tish king will be played by John strictly negro folk music to the
Sargent, '50, with Warren Pickett, newest and frantic bop of the
Grad., taking the part of the Earl "real gone boppers" adds to the
of Kent, loyal adviser to the king. range and color of the sessions.
Ann Husselman, '50, and Joyce In addition, occasional Friday
Atchison, '50, wil take the parts of night excursions are made to cities
Regan and Goneril, both selfish, and towns in Michigan to join
cruel daughters of Lear. The third other hot record societies in jam
daughter Cordelia, loving, noble sessions, from the rarest collec-
but stubborn like her father, will tions in the state.
be acted by Marilyn Gegole.
In the role of the gullible Earl Purdom Sa s
of Glouchester will be Ted
Heusel, Grad., and the jester
who attempts to give his king PositionsOpen
advice through foolery played
by Arthur Flemings, Grad. The June graduate can wipe the
Tickets for the performances perspiration from his brow and be
may be obtained beginning Mon- assured that a job will be available
day from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. at for him if he proves competent,
the Lydia Mendelssohn box of- according to T. Luther Purdom,
fice or reserved by calling 6300. director of the University Bureau
The production is under the di- of Appointments.
rection of Prof. William P. Hal- The number of job recruitment
stead with set design by George interviews scheduled for the next
Crepeau and costumes by Bar- two weeks is the greatest the Uni-
bara Hamel. versityB uireauof Annnintments

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5

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JUMBO SIZE

ANNIVERSARY SALE

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ENTIRE STOCK
of MEN'S SHOES
20% 0off
Limited Time Only
NATIONALLY ADVERTISED
NEW SPRING STYLES

,

NI,

A
A

SPECIAL SALE

I

WINTHROP
4;uncc

I

Direct connections for Washington - Philadelphia - Newark - New York and all points East
Fares increase April 1, 1950.
All Fares subject to 15% Federal Tax.
Reservations close at 12:00 o'clock noon Thursday, April 6.

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