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March 22, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNE~SDAY, MARCH 22, 1950

4 : "- ..

Vew House for International Living Opens Doors
* * * * I> * * * *
\ NelsonHouse WillStress
Cooperation- Understandimo I

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By CHARLES ELLIOTT
The Nelson House for International Living, newest of campus
groups devoted to better relations between American and foreign stu-
dents, opened its doors for the first time this semester.
It stands as the realized dream of a group of students, mans
of them veterans who had served overseas, for a house of this kind
where they could actually live and work with students from other
countries.
Headed by Bill Miller, Grad, they formed an organization or
campus known as the Committee for International Living, were recog-
nized by the Office of Student Affairs, and proceeded to work.
ALTHOUGH money problems hampered them from the start
and at times things looked pretty hopeless, a year ago a mnemorial
foundation of Detroit became interested in the project and purchased
a house for them.
Situated at 915 Oakland, the massive old Victorian structure
will, when renovation is complete, house 34 men of many nation-
alities.
Formerly Zimmer League House, and of late a boarding house,
the 65-year old mansion is being completely reworked, largely by the
student's themselves. Members are given free rein when it comes to
decorating their quarters. The high-ceilinged rooms are of many
strange shapes and sizes, from a small tower cubby-hole to the "stu-
lio" with a huge skylight and dormered windows.
* * * *
WHEN THE WORK is completed, the rooms will be mostly
doubles and triples, with American and foreign students together in
each room.
The men live cooperatively, doing all their own housework
and washing dishes. According to Miller, "We are only dependent
upon the cook." Their tentative budget indicates living expenses
will be about $70 per month.
As the key idea behind the House is international living, all their
projected plans point towards this. When they have reached capa-
city, there will be 17 Americans and 17 foreign students. Already,
there are eight countries besides the United States represented, in-
cluding Thailand, Norway, Japan, Holland, India, China, Iraq, and
Turkey.
* * * *
THE "INTERNATIONALIZATION" plan extends even ipto the
realm of cookery. Each Saturday night, students from one of the
foreign countries whip up a meal typical of their land.
Last Saturday, for example, China was the country represent-
ed, and the others were served a dinner of Don Hwo soup, Chinese
roast pork, Chao Don, dry shrimp and cabbage, and rice, complete
to chopsticks.
THE GROUP PLANS to invite persons who are visiting the Uni-
versity from other countries to live at the house during their stay in
Ann Arbor. First of these guests was Raden Suwanto, cultural and
educational attache to the Indonesian Embassy, recently here in con-
nection with Brotherhood Week.
THE DINING room is especially arranged to encourage conver-
sation, Miller said. The men eat family style, four at a table. Ac-
cording to Miller, whose field of study is international relations, "It's
wonderful to be able to simply talk across the supper table to find
out about a foreign culture, and at the same time get a better under-
standing of it than weeks of study could furnish."
The House plans to enter into intra-mural athletic activity in
the near future. They will also sponsor various social activities after
they get squared away.

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There are still some copies of

GARGOYLE
On sale in the Student Publications Building
Second Floor - Cashier's Counter
/ Two bits apiece

Fraternity Week Renewed;
IFC Ball To BeAll-Campus

FEATURED ALSO during the
three days' festivities will be inter-
fraternity and sorority round
table discussions, IFC Sing May
10 and a House Presidents' din-
ner May 11.
An address by Dean Warnocke
of Pennsylvania State College,
vice-chairman of the national
IFC, May 9 at Rackham, will
officially I a u n c h Fraternity
Eldersveld Will
Speak on Britain
Prof. Samuel Eldersveld, of the
political science department, will
give members of the American for
Democratic Action an inside view
on the British election at 7:30
p.m. today in the Union.
Prof. Eldersveld will speak on
"British Politics in Action" in an
open ADA meeting.
Triii..
50
, .e r % t'/ .

Week activities, according to
Vogt, project chairman.
The committee has already sign-
ed jump king Tommy Dorsey and
his band, featuring Buddy Rich
on drums, to rock IFC Ball-goers,
he added.
"IN DROPPING the custom of
inviting only affiliates to the af-
fair," Vogt pointed out, "we not
only welcome independents and
their dates, but have completed
plans for furnishing a dance booth
for them."
Aiding Vogt in arrangements
are Phyllis Bohnsack, '50 Ed.,
assistant chairman, and Mary
Helen King, '51, and Dick Fer-
rara, publicity directors.
Preparations for the roundtatl
discussions are being handled by
Jean Marson, '50, and Bill Plumb,
'52 A&D. IFC Sing arrangements
are under supervision of Bill Du-
err, '50E.

JWhen
Traveling
carry

APROPROS?

41

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THAVELER"S

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CHE CKS

ANN ARBOR BANK

Main and Huron Sts.
South State at Nickels Arcade 1 108 South

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University

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YOUNG REPUBLICANS

.5
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invite you to HEAR

SURE NUFF

Field House
University, Loui
(Baton Rouge)

Meeting the gang to di
-a date with the cam

"Some Things are

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never forgotten!

scuss a quiz
Zpus queen-

The 1950 ENSIAN

or just killing time between classes
-the Field House at Louisiana State
University in Baton Rouge is one
of the favorite places for a rendez-

has all your school

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