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February 14, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-02-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I " Y

STRATION EXPLANATION:
.ilroad Tickets Irksome Economical

By ROMA LIPSKY
he thousands of student hours
hundreds of bottles of ink
at the beginning of each
ester to fill out the registra-
railroad ticket may be ex-
ingly irksome to students, but
process saves the University
'oximately $22,000 a semester.
-cording to Assistant Registrar
ard Groesbeck, the University
d have to spend about $1 for
istudent if one card were fill-
ut and photostated 12 times.
CHECK OF the offices which
ive cards revealed that the
rmation is used for everything
Z supplying men with co-ed's
>hone numbers to making out
scripts.
'he long tickets are collected
the cashier at registration,
I alphabetized in Waterman
m as they are turned in. Sat-
.ay morning, after registra-
n closes, the tickets are taken
the General Library where a
cial machine cuts them along
perforated lines. They are
-m sorted and taken to various
iversity offices in long coffin-
e wooden boxes.,
'hen the offices opened yes-
ay morning, they had cards
every registered student, al-
betized and ready to be used.
racing the various cards takes
to every corner of the campus.
ard one goes to the registrar's
e and is used for student's of-

3, *~ S

x * *

RegentS OK
New Medic
Department
Establishment of a Department
of Physical Medicine and Rehab-
ilitation was approved at the
January meeting of the Board of
Regents.
Dr. James W. Rae, Jr. was ap-
pointed assistant professor and
acting chairman of the new de-
partment, effective July 1, 1950.
THE REGENTS approved the
appointment of Dr. Russell N.
DeJong as chairman of the De-
partment of Neurology in the
Medical School. He will replace
Dr.Carl D. Camp who will begin
his retirement furlough at the be-
ginning of the spring semester.
The new department of Phys-
ical Medicine and Rehabilita-
tion will assist all departments
in the Medical School, providing
service in physical therapy, re-
habilitation and occupational
therapy. Paralytics and similar
cases will be treated in the new
department.
The department will offer a
course in physical medicine open
to undergraduate medical students
as well as interns. A three-year
residency training program will
be established, and lectures pro-
vided for physical therapy tech-
nicians and nurses.
* * *
DR. RAE received a Bachelor
of Science degree from the Uni-
versity in 1940 and was graduated
from the Medical School in 1943.
After an internship at Uni-
versity Hospital, Dr. Rae was
on active duty with the U.S.
Naval Reserve from 1944Uto
1946. Since 1947 he has been a
fellow in physical medicine at
the Mayo Foundation of the
University of Minnesota.
Dr. DeJong, the new chairman
of the Department of Neurology,
received a Bachelor of Arts degree
in 1929, medical degree in 1932,
and Master of Arts degree in 193
from the University. In 1941 he
was promoted to associate pro-
fessor.
Delay Action
On Setting Up
WSSF Gal
A tentative resolution not to
adopt u definite goal for the
World Student Service Fund -was
T)Adq d riio tho xQQP'_w

Chicago House Selects FDR
Man of Half-Century in Survey

Bamboo Booms
At _Michigan

PROFIT
SAVING
Ask about extra earnings
on Bonus Savings
Accounts

ficial records, from which trans-
cript and permanent records are
made up. The cards are kept for
six or seven years, and then sent
to the Alumni Catalog Office.
* * *
CARD TWO, filled out only by
foreign students, is sent to the
International Center, and is used
for information for the Immigra-
tion Office, as well as to help lo-
cate foreign students.
Health Service receives the
third form, and uses it to check
whether patients are enrolled in
theUniversity. These cards are
kept only for one semester.
The Office pf Student Affairs,
which files card four, supplies tele-
phone numbers, addresses and in-
formation about students every
day. More complete than the Stu-
dent Directory, the office is a
thriving information source. They
keep cards on file for about a year
and one-half before destroying
them.

tion cards. They are kept on file
for a year and then sent to the
Alumni Catalog Office.
THE EIGHTH CARD, sent to
the Union for men and the League
for women, helps those organi-
zations keep a file of its members,
and are often referred to long
after a student graduates for his
address or to check his member-
ship standing.
The ninth card is used by the
Dean of Women's Office for a
housing census, and for infor-
mation on women students, and
is sent to the men's physical
education department for male
students. Beginning next semes-
ter, men will no longer be re-
quired to fill out this card. A
Daily check indicated, that the
physical education department
will not need the forms.
The Alumni Catalog Office,
which keeps the 10th card, uses
it to keep its permanent file on
every student up to date. The
cards sent here are never de-
stroyed.
* * *
THE BUSINESS office, which'
receives card number 11, uses it
to make up diplomas and as a
listing of students officially en-
rolled in the University.
Last on the sheet, the Cashier's
Office card, is a proof of tuition
payment.

RALPH N. BYERS
Byers Named
.'News' Editor
R1alph N. Byers has been ap-
pointed successor to Arthur W.
Stace as editor of the Ann Arbor
News.
r Byers, 48 years old, is a gradu-
ate of the University and a former
automotive and assistant sports
editor of the Flint Journal. He ser-
ved as news editor of the News for
15 years, and is a native of New
Castle, Pa.
Stace, Byers' predecessor, who
was a prominent Michigan jour-
nalist, died in January of a heart
ailment.
Army Moving
To Eliminate
Bias inRanks
Progress toward the elimination
of segregation in the Armed
Forces is being made, according to
William Edwards Stevenson, Pres-
ident of Oberlin College, who at-
tended a reception given in his
honor yesterday at Cleinents Li-
brary.
President Stevenson, a member
of a commission authorized by
Presidnt Truman to investigate
segregation in the Armed Forces,
pointed to recent action taken by
the Army, Navy and Air Force as
an indication of partial success,.in
the battle against Jim Crowism.
AIR CORPS officials have an-
nounced that the all-Negro fight-
er unit will be disbanded and its
members distributed throughout
the service without discrimination,
President Stevenson said.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt won
another election.
The late president was voted
"man of the half-century" by resi-
dents of Chicago House in the
West Quadrangle.
IN A POLL conducted by the
house newspaper, "Chicago Life,"
to determine the period's out-
standing personage, FDR cor-
nered a vote from nearly every
man in the house.
Fellowships
Go To Fifteen
On IU'Faculty
Faculty Research Fellowships
for 1950 have been awarded to 15
University faculty members, ac-
cording to Dean Ralph A. Sawyer
of the Graduate School.
Carrying a stipend approxi-
mately equal to the salary the
faculty member would receive for
teaching in the Summer Session,
the fellowships are given to facili-
tate specific research projects -
particularly by younger members
of the fa'culty.
* * *
THOSE RECEIVING the 1950
fellowships are Carl A. Bauer,
astronomy; Gerald S. Brown, his-
tory; Prof. Wilfrid T. Dempster,
anatomy; Prof. Alfred M. Elliott,
zoology; Otto G. Graf, German;
and Prof. George Kish, geography.
Other grants were made to Prof.
William R. Leslie, history; Prof.
James H. Meisel, political science;
James C. O'Neill, Romance lan-
guanges; Prof. O. M. Pearl, Fine
Arts; Prof. Hans Samelson, math-
ematics; Prof. Federico Sanchez y
Escribano, Romance languages;
Wyman R. Vaughan, chemistry;
Prof. Marcellus L. Wiedenbeck,
physics; and Prof. James T. Wil-
son, geology.
~Goden Boy'
Tickets To Go
on Sale Today
Tickets for the play "Golden
Boy" by Clifford Odets, will be on
sale from 1 to 4:30 p.m. today in
the Administratidn Bldg., and
from 1 to 5 p.m. tomorrow through
Friday in the League and Union
lobbies.
The production is set for 8:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday, in Pat-
tengill Auditorium.
The 1937 Broadway hit concerns
Joe Bonaparte, an Italian-Amei-
caa youth with great talent as a
violinist, whose desire for fame
leads him into professional prize
fighting. The lead is played by Ron
Sobel. Mrs. Marie Miller, who has
directed and acted professionally,
is directing the play.
Others in the cast include Har-
vey Stuart, Betty 'Lou Robinson
and Fred Stuart.

r

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But his victory wasn't very
sweeping. Each voter was al-
lowed five choices from a ballot
listing 64 famous-and infam-
ous-individuals.
Second was Albert Einstein with
81 votes to Roosevelt's 90.
A VIRTUAL unknown on the
ballot, Whitcomb L. Judson, rack-
ed up nine tallies to make lesser
winners like Nobel, Goodyear,
and Walt Disney look like pikers.
Judson invented the zipper.
Seven electors gave their votes
to Herman Dresler, the man who
concocted the first aspirin tablet.

The whole town's jungle-happy...
everybody's rushing to buy Vaughn
-Monroe's BAMBOO! You can't re-
sist its dramatic words, its pulsing,
pounding tom-tom rhythm! Get this
skyrocketing RCA VICTOR hit
now!

I

One of 4 MODELS
priced from
$97.50 to $187.50

Don't Be In Doubt!
Here is an opportunity to
meet Mr. Carlson, one
Consu\to' of Otarion's Chief Hear-
d e onstctons ing Aid Consultants dir-
s dand Njed. ect from Otarion Labora-
Son -ues4,15tories in Chicago. Now
bt no personal obligation,
6 you can discuss your per-
sonal hearing problem
with him.
CALKINS -=FLETCHER'
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116 N. Fourth Ave.
Opposite Court House
Phone 2-2549

THE FIFTH CARD, the stu-
dent's cashier receipt, is used and
disposed of in probably 22,000 dif-
ferent ways.
The sixth spot on the ticket is
most appreciated by students
filling out the form-a blank
space.
Card seven, kept by the Re-
corder's office, is used for the stu-
dent's statistical record, and is
helpful in sorting and filing elec-

Assets Over
$13,500,000

Pas'eaa uring Lt eWvr Retreat-
Saturday and Sunday at Pine- "The commission approached
brook Farms, according to Wym the Army from the angle of
Price, WSSF drive chairman. opening all fields of specializa-
A definite decision on the goal tion."
will be adopted during the WSSF'
Council meeting, 4:30 p.m. Wed- Proof of its success is evident in
nesday in Lane Hall. Suggestions the Army's recent announcement
concerning the setting of a drivel that Negroes may specialize. The
goal were requested from the stu- Army is also discussing the pos-
dent body by Price. sible elimination of segregated
Three new positions were filled quarters, President S t e v e n s o n
during the retreat. Dick McGaw added.

324 South State

818 South State

LI

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S t
;*>.SYLVIA STUDIO' OF DANCE
Daily Classes for Beginners, Intermediates,
Advanced and Professionals in
ACADEMIC BALLET - TOE - ADAGIO
ACROBATIC - TA '-- CHARACTER
BALLROOM -- JUNIOR BALLROOM
Adult Class for Beginners in Ballet
Beginners Class in Academic Ballet for Men
SYLVIA HAMER, Director
--:- On Faculty of Dance Masters of America 4
On Faculty of Chicago National Association
of Dancing Masters
603 E. Liberty " Over Michigan Theater 0 Phone 8066
. . .,. r.::::::::s ::: ::{%: 5: {: ? ::'.::::.. .: ...:..::::...::::::::+...

uu tj i 1cU GV. 1!11 tt.UW,
'52E, was appointed to coordinate
the scheduling of the film, "This
Is Their Story." The film which
documents the work of WSSF
throughout the world, is available
to any house on campus request-
ing it at Lane Hall.
Betty J. Winterle was also se-
lected as office staff chairman,
and has requested volunteers to
help staff the WSSF office. Sophia
L. Holley, Grad., Student Religious
Association relief chairman, was
appointed to organize all guild
relief representatives into an in-
ter-guild relief board and has re-
quested that all guilds contact her
as soon as possible.
WSSF positions still remaining
open, according to Price, are so-
licitations chairman, and editor
of the WSSF Newsletter. Applica-
tions for the posts may be made
with Price.

* * *
THE NAVY has fully carried out
its plan of dispersion and integra-
tion of personnel regardless of
race, President Stevenson said.
Casting for Op ?ra
Will OpenToday
Casting for "Lace It Up," the
1950 Union Opera, will begin to-
day in Rm. 3G, Union.
A schedule showing appoint-
ment times for all persons who
signed up for casting appoint-
ments will be posted outside Rm.
3G.
Casting will be under the super-
vision of William Holbrook, the
New York director of this year's
Union's opera.

THE
OFFICIAL MICHIGAN RING
-IMMEDIATE DELIVERY
COMPLIMENTARY ENGRAVING
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 S. University Phone 3-1733

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