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March 18, 1950 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-03-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tai~ MIIGAN DITCJR

SATUR~DAY, MARCHR 18, 1950

-r

FF TO A FAST START:
'U' Photo Service Aids Visual Education

By DAVE THOMAS start in the rapidly expanding
Surrounded by $15,000 worth of field of visual education.
le latest photographic and dup- During the first month of oper-
eating equipment, the newly or- ation in their new location in the
anized University Photographic basement of the Administration
ervices are getting off to a fast Building, the eight-man crew has

turned out more than 1,000 photo-
graphs and upwards of 500 lan-
tern slides for teaching purposes,
according to Supervisor Fred An-
deregg.
IN ADDITION, the photostatic
copying division of the service has
made countless thousands of cop-
ies of maps, transcripts, drawings
and records since its opening last
July.
Between the end of examina-
tions and registration alone,
close to 15,000 transcripts roll-
ed off the huge, automatic pho-
tostat machine and an addition-
al 30,000 copies were prepared
by another process, the ozalid
machine.

The primary activity of the
photographic end of the service
is in the field of visual aids, ac-
cording to Anderegg. Much of
their work is making slides and
photographs for various Univer-
sity departments.
* * *
THE FIELD of visual education
is growing every day and it won't
be long before the social sciences
and humanities find greater uses
for the new teaching technique,
Anderegg believes.
Anderegg is an old hand at
visual educational photography,
having first become interested
in the field 20 years ago while
rshaii studying for his doctorate in ge-
phic ology at Princeton.
Scientific photography so fas-
sion cinated him that he stayed on at
for Princeton, gradually expanding
his department until he was doing
most of the school's photographic
work. He remained there until a
year ago when he came to the
University to set up this new de-
partment. -

-Daily-Carlyle Mai
SMILE PLEASE-A photographer of the University Photogra
Services prepares to shoot a detail map for the geography
partment. Most of the work done by the photographic divi
of the service is of this type - visual educational work
University departments.

THE MAIN DINING ROOM
of the
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN UNION

Serving Sunday Dinner
To Our Members and Their Guests
12:35 to 5:50 P.M.

J.

Q Take your Date TONIGHT at 8
- V
V O
v MELODY,
0
Special Rates
for Students
- with ID CardsO
^
UNIVERSITY ICE RINK
5o ==o< :o4 o<-->y©o<-y o o<=>o<-yo< o -o o
STAGE COACH INN 4
Have you Q
any PARTIES, BANQUETS
or RECEPTIONS 9
We will solve this problem for you with de-
licious meals, either served at our beautiful
dining rooms, or taken home. Food prepared
& to your taste, from Filet Mignon and Roasts
to Lobster and Southern Fried Chicken.
Pick up the nearest phone, and call . . . 6004
STAGE COACH INN 40
503 East Huron StreetQ

IN ADDITION to a movie cam-
era, seven darkroomsaand a raft of
other photographic equipment,
Anderegg hopes someday to have
a stock of small cameras to check
out to field parties and to students
doing special duty.
The service is on a self-sus-
taining basis, the various de-
partments in the University
paying for their work out of
their regular operating appro-
priations.
Students as well as University
departments may have work done
by the service if it is in conjunc-
tion with their studies, according
to Anderegg.
Student Heads
Firoure Skating
Presentation
Already branching out from her
work in the literary college, Mari-
lyn Jacobs, '52, is now directing
200 Ann Arborites for "Melody on
Ice," a presentation by the Ann
Arbor Figure Skating Club to be
held at 8 p.m. today and 3 p.m.
tomorrow at the Coliseum.
Miss Jacobs, who has been skat-
ing for 15 years, has charge of the
cast of skaters, ranging in age
from four to 60. One of the older
skaters is a University faculty
member.
She has studied with Michael
Kirby, former partner of Sonja
Henie, and with the teacher of
world's champion Dick Button.
Though skating is her first love,
she wants to go into teaching.
Student tickets are 75 cents
with ID card and must be bought
at the door before show time.
Faculty Members
To Speak at WWJ
Four University faculty mem-
bers will discuss international
atomic controls at 7:30 p.m. today
in the auditorium of station WWJ
in Detroit as part of the station's
world forum series.
Speaking on the panel will be
Dean Ralph A. Sawyer of the
Graduate School, Prof. Preston
Slosson of the history department,
and N. Marbury Efimenco of the
p o 1 i t i c a 1 science department.
The discussion will be moderated
by Prof. Marshall Knappen of the
political science department.
Co-op Open House
Robert Owen Co-op House will
hold a "How-Jedu" party from
8 to 12 p.m. today.
Robert Owen House is sponsor-
ing the party to "acquaint the
campus with Co-op houses and
their principles," according to
Nick Datsko, '50.

Alumni Fete
University's
113thYear
Michigan alumni throughout
the world today are celebrating
the 113th birthday anniversary of
the University.
Several birthday parties are be-
ing held by alumni clubs in Mich-
igan and several other states. Alu-
mni clubs in Cuba, Nicaragua, the
Philippines, Japan, India, Tur-
key, Puerto Rico, Argentina, Ecu-
ador, Brazil, Columbia, Venezu-
ela, Hawaii and Canada have
made similar birthday plans.
r President Alexander G. Ruth-
ven is combining birthday cele-
brations with Phoenix Project
meetings on his trip through the
Northwest. President Ruthven is
meeting with alumni clubs to dis-
cuss the current plans for the
Phoenix Project.
Other administrative officers
and faculty are on the road to
take part in these birthday meet-
ings. Provost James P. Adams will
address a Midland Meeting, Vice-
president Marvin Niehuss is mov-
ing from Bay City to Owosso and
Vice-president Robert P. Briggs
will talk to three New York state
clubs at Binghamton, Utica and
Schenectady.
Arthur L. Brandon, university
relations counselor, and Controll-
er Wilbur K. Pierpont are on a
tour of the Upper Peninsula clubs
combining birthday celebrations
with Phoenix Project meetings.
Local Dems
Plan to Ease
HousingCosts
Lashing out at Ann Arbor's pre-
sent Republican administration
for its "failure to use federal help
to ease the city's housing short-
age," the Democratic City Ccn-
mittee announced an eight point
platform for the April 3 elections
yesterday.
The platform calls for the es-
tablishment of an Ann Arbor
housing authority to investigate
the possibility of constructing a
low-cost housing project in the
Ann Arbor area with federal aid.
* * *
COMMITTEE chairman Samuel
J. Eldersveld of the University
political science department call-
ed the platform a "Common de-
nominator" viewpoint which had
the support of the entire local
Democratic organization.,
The platform also called for:
1. Revision of Ann Arbor's 60-
year-old charter, a proposal which
the Republicans favor also.
2. A bond issue and tax boost
to build the proposed new $2,600,-
000 county building.
3. A re-examination of the lo-
cal bus situation. "If enough peo-
ple need Sunday service, a city
should provide a subsidiary."
4. Construction of a large muni-
cipally-owned outdoor swimming
pool as a memorial to the city's
war dead.
5. An ordinance requiring the
rat-proofing of all business places.
6. A reapportionment of city
wards based on 1950 census fig-
ures.
The platform also approves the
recent city-county health depart-
ment merger.

Prof. Kantonen
To Talk on Luther
Prof. Taite A. Kantonen will ad-
dres the Lutheran Faculty and
Graduate Student Group on "Lu-
ther's Approach to Ethics" at 8
p.m. Saturday at the Lutheran
Student Center.
Prof. Kantonen, a professor of
Systematic Theology at Hamma
Divinity School, Springfield, Ohio,
will also occupy the Pulpit of Tri-
nity Lutheran Church at the Sun-
day morning worship service, and
at 7 p.m. Sunday at the Zion
Lutheran Parish Hall.
Try FOLLETT'S First
Every Book for Every Course
USED BOOKS
at
BARGAIN PRICES

By J17M BROWN
Need a secretary? - Student
Legislature has eight!
Under a new system inaugurat-
ed this semester by SL's corres-
ponding secretary, Nancy Wat-
kins, '51, the Legislature now has
a smoothly functioning Secretar-1
iat working five days a week at
the SL office in the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs.
COMPOSED OF seven students
working under the direction of
Miss Watkins, the Secretariat is
used by all SL members for typing
letters, preparing brochures, mak-
Ing up weekly agendas and filing
committee reports.
"One of our biggest headaches
right now is the organizing and
compiling of petitions and can-
didate's statements for this
spring's all-campus elections,"
Miss Watkins said.
Each of the secretaries, none of
whom are SL members, voluntar-
ily spend two hours a week in the
pint-sized SL office jammed with
typewriters, filing cabinets, desks
and bulletin boards.
"ALTHOUGH they're supposed
to be there for strictly business
purposes, I'm afraid they're sub-
jected to 'all kinds of amateur po-
liticing," Miss Watkins said.
One Student Affairs Office
staff nwmber, asked whether
Local Station Will
Begin New Series
Federal Aid to Education will be!
the topic of a series of threeI
broadcasts which wil begin at 7:30I
p.m. today on station WHRV.

-Daily-Ed KozMa
SL SECRETARIAT-Nancy Watkins, '51 (standing), director of.
Student Legislature's newly organized Secretariat, supervises
Jon Frane, '53, (left) and Janet Eckfeld. '53, as they prepare
letters to be mailed to all SL members. Staffed by eight volunteer
workers, the Secretariat handles all SL office and clerical work.
' k
SL Office Crowd Increased
By Addition Of Secretariat

When Zino Francescatti gives
the final Choral Union concert at
8:30 p.m. Monday at Hill Audi-
torium he'll be playing with his
Hart.
The famous "Hart" stradivarius
which dates back to 1727 is a
SL Ends Rent
Investigatio'n
Student Legislature's investiga-
tion of reports that students are
being charged excessive rents by
Ann Arbor landlords collapsed
yesterday when Detroit OPA in-
spector John Edwards reported
that he had received no com-
plaints from University students.
The Legislature's campus ac-
tion committee had launched the
investigation two weeks ago, urg-
ing students who thought they
were being charged rents above
OPA ceilings to report their sus-
picions to Edwards at the City
Hall.
Edwards said, however, that he
had not been contacted by a
single student, although he had
offered to investigate any com-
plaints which were registered.
"We know that there are vio-
lations of OPA ceilings in Ann Ar-
bor, but we can't do a thing about
them unless they are reported to
us," he added.
Edwards promised to remain in
the City Council Chambers ofthe
City Hall from 9 to 5 p.m. next
Friday so that students could con-
tact him later in the afternoon.

s k. , > . g"'.;?'2 ''x ;t Fra ncescatti To 1Terminate
N ..............~Choral Union Concert Seris

proud possession of the French
violinist. He had admired it for
years and finally bought it in 1942.
The instrument is considered one
of the best works of the great
violin maker Cremona.
MRS. FRANCESCATTI reports
that when the violin first came
into the possession of her husband
he retired with it to his room and
for several days could not be per-
suaded to leave.
"He practically went to bed
with it tucked under his chin,"
she said.
The Marseilles-born virtuoso
has been called "worthy of the
mantle of Paganini" and, as a
matter of fact, the glory of that
legendary virtuoso comes to him
by direct heredity.
* * *
HIS FATHER, Rene Francescat-
ti, studied with Sivori, the only
direct pupil of Paganini. The sole
teacher of his son, he passed on
the tradition to Zino.
For sentimental as well as vir-
tuoso reasons, Francescatti chose
the "Paganini D. major con-
certo" for his American debut
with the New York Philharmon-
ic Symphony in 1939.
For his Monday concert here
Francescatti will play Hindemith's
"Sonata No. 2"; Bach's "Partita
No. 2" (for violin alone); "Mil-
haud's "Suite"; Saint-Saens' "Ha-
vanaise" and Sarasate's "Zigeun-
erweisen (Gypsy Airs)."
A limited number of tickets are
still available at the offices of the
University Musical Society, Bur-
ton Tower.

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Earl Grandstaff, Acting Minister
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
9:45 AM.: Student Class studying "The Teach-
ings of Jesus."
10:50 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon topic,
"The Influence of a Christian." Nursery for
children during the service. (This service will
be broadcast over WHRV.)
GUILD HOUSE: 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Minister to Students
Jea.n Garee, Associate
Student Guild: 6:00 supper at this church. Rev.
Grandstaff, chaplain at University Hospital,
will speak on "In Sickness and In Health."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue-Phone 2-0085
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Adult Study Group.
11:00 A.M.: Service of-Worship-Rev. Merrill O.
Bates, Grosse Pointe Unitarian minister, preach-
ing on: "The Realist."
7:00 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group. Rev. Ed-
ward H. Redman on, "Unitarian Social Ideals"
-"Building the Bridge Across The Chasm Be-
tween Peoples and Cultures."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday morning Services. Subject,
Mar. 1 9--Matter.
9:15 A.M.: Sunday school.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Services.
A free reading room is maintained at 211 East
Washington Street where the Bible and all
authorized Christian Science literature may be
read, borrowed, or purchased.
This room is open daily, except Sundays and
holidays, from 11:30 to 5 P.M.; on Saturdays
until 9 P.M.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
National Lutheran Council
1304 Hill Street
H~nrvO. Yder. .D..Pastor

Y
a
a
b
p
M
I r

the SL office was usually very
crowded, simply threw up her
hands and exclaimed, "Oh bro-
ther!''"
She urged all coeds who would
like to work with SL as a Secre-
tariat member for her to contact'
her immediately at the SL office.

4

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£ ate
DRUG COMPANY
has complete lines of
DRUGS
TOILETRIES
STATIONERY
At our fountain
BREAKFAST
LUNCH
DINNER
State Drug Company
Packard at State
A - A-~l. a - A-A-A-A-A- - A-A-a- - - -

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FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H.Loucks, Minister and Student
Counsellor
Roger Williams Guild, 502 East Huron
10:00 A.M.: Bible Study.. Isaiah.
11:00 A.M.: Service broadcast over WPAG. Ser-
mon by Rev. Loucks, "What Do You Think?"
6:00 P.M.: Cost Supper and Fellowship. Rev.
William Henderson, Director of the Westmin-
ster Foundation, will speak on "The Nature of
Man."
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D.
Student Directors-H. L. Pickerill; Jean Garee
Music-Wayne Dunlap; J. Bertram Strickland
9:30 A.M.: Intermediate Church School.
10:45 A.M.:nNursery, Kindergarten and Primary
Departments.
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship. Dr. Parr will preach
the fourth sermon in the Lenten series on
"These Sayings of Mine." Subject, "The Char-
ter of Happiness."
4:30 PM.: Pastor's instruction class in church
parlor.
6:00 P.M.: The Student Guild. Supper at Me-
morial Christian Church. Rev. Earl Grandstaff,
chaplain at University Hospital, will speak on,
"In Sickness and In Health."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Av.
W. P. Lemon and W. H. Henderson, Ministers
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
Mildred Beam, Church School Director
9:00 A.M.: Westminster Guild Seminar in Re-
ligion followed by breakfast at 10:00 A.M.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Lenten Sermon
Topic by Dr. Lemon-"The Truth of the in-
accurate."
5:30 P.M.: Westminster Guild supper followed
at 6:30 by an address "In the Service of the
Forgotten' by Lloyd Putnam.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
No. Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast,rCanterburyGHouse).
9:45 A.M.: Church School, Grades 7, 8, 9.
11:00 A.M.: Church School, thru Grade 6.
11:00 A.M.: Order of Confirmation. Sermon by
the Rt. Rev. Richard S. M. Emrich, Bishop of
Michigan.
12:30 P.M.: Confirmation Reception, Canterbury
House.
5:00 P.M.: High School Pot-luck Supper and
Program, Page Hall.
5:30 P.M.: Canterbury Club Buffet Supper and
Program, Canterbury House. Bishop Emrich
will speak.
8:00 P.M.: Evening Prayer. Sermon by the Rev.
Henry Lewis.
5:15 P.M. Daily (Mon. thru Fri.) : Evening .
Prayer and Meditation.
7:15 A.M. Wednesday: Holy Communion
(followed by Student Breakfast).
10:15 A.M. Thursday: Holy Communion; 12:10
P.M. Student Luncheon; 12:30 P.M. Interces-
sions (church) ; 6:30 P.M. Family Lenten Pot-
luck Supper, Page Hall, followed by Study of
the Bible at 7:30.
12:10 P.M. Friday: Holy Communion (followed
by luncheon in Page Hall); 4:00 to 6:00 PM.
Open House, Canterbury House.
7:15 A.M. Saturday (The Annunciation) : Holy
Communion.

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We carry a full line of
KOSHER DELICATESSEN

11

Attend a
FREE LECTURE
entitled

ny V. IU , v.v. , F
9:10 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Services in Zion and Trinity
Lutheran Church.
5:30 P.M.: L.S.A. Supper Meeting in Zion Luth-
eran Parish Hall.
7:00 P.M.: "sProgram, Dr. Taito Kantonen,
speaker.
7:30 P.M. Tuesday: Discussion Group at the
Center, "What Do Lutherans Believe."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue-Phone 5560
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Rev. Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
9:30 A.M.: Bible Study.
10:30 A.M.: Service, with Holy Communion.
Sermon by the pastor, "My Church Attend-
anrce."
5:30 P.M.: Supper and program of Gamma Delta,
Lutheran Student Club. Discussion, "Does Man
Have the Right to Take Human Life?"
9:15 P.M. Tuesday: Social Hour.
7:30 P.M. Wednesday: Lenten Vespers.
6:00 P.M. Friday: Married Couples Dinner and
Evening.

X

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f __ ®_ -__ __ _ __ __ _ _e

SALAMI

CORNED BEEF

PASTRAMER

"CHRISTIAN
SCIENCE: The
Hope of Mankind"
by
CLAIRE RAUTHE, C.S..
of London, England
Member of the Board of Lec-
tureship of The Mother Church,
The First Church of Christ,
Scientist, in Boston
AMnCCnrhi ,co**c,

A

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7,563,427 tickets

FRESH DAILY
RPFAfD RA(GF R I-- I -

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Ea~II I a I

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH

CHURCH OF CHRIST
210 N. Fourth Ave.
Y.M.C.A. Auditorium
Carl York Smith, Minister
Telephbne Numbers: 2-6007 and 2-7120
A.M.: "The Family of God."

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