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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 17, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Fire4nvesigatr toChee
'' ,.r. :.n :::.". 'rr.o > ",;h y .,. tj ; ;:. .t .. ?,": .t r.C .
Say Division:; Student: : Multiple y"l, Dwellings6 ":i:S.
n:"4 . v:".v ....f .:i:) }:,' r :'i . .i}.:. . .:.vXi::
...- .. - ..... ,...Pr. ..:,v"i' '}C:..h 1..;,.n".::'i~ :"T::ni- iu .:':.yvvr"?: Q3.. v i:..':"v. "E

FRID)AY, MA.IMH 19, 199th

TryF1ISI - SPECIAL!!"
CHICKEN
IN A BASKET, with
rolls and butter
$1.00

methods and then go on an eight-
week tour of the nation.
They are the first Koreans to
come to the U.S. under the new
Exchange of Persons Program.
THE SEPARATION of North
and South Korea, which has
steadily widened with the height-
ening of the cold war, has become
so critical that no one can cross
the border without fear of Com-
munist action, the Koreans said.
The upshot of such a tight
division, Prof. Ahn Ho Sam of
Seoul National University ex-
plained, is that people in the
industrial Communist-North are
short of food, while the farmers
of the South are shut off from
sources of machinery.
Even the few factories that are
in the South cannot operate on a
full-time basis, Chai Hyung Suk,
public middle school teacher com-
mented.
SO STRICTLY is the arbitrary
boundary line enforced, Kang Joo
Han, girl's middle school teacher,
asserted, that children from one
side cannot cross over to see
friends on the other.
Although the visitors do not
have trouble with the English cur-
rently spoken in the U.S., the
numerous "Americanisms" in to-
day's magazines and newspapers
confuse them.
The teachers blame this con-
fusion indirectly to the long per-
iod of Japanese domination. "Be-
cause of the Japanese occupation,"
they claimed, "the only books
available for study in Korea are
of nineteenth century origin.'"

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
LET THERE BE MORE LIGHT-Bill Isaacson, plant department
electrician, assembles one of the hangers which will help hold
up the fluorescent lights now being installed in a number of
Angell Hall classrooms.
. .
Lighting Acoustics Improved
In Angell Hall Modernization

An appreciable decrease in the
number of Ann Arbor rooming
houses was predicted ye'sterday by
William A. Hunter, newly ap-
pointed fire investigator.
"Many Ann Arbor houses were
never designated as multiple
dwellings," he said, "and as a re-
sult, owners will find the neces-
sary improvements expensive."
He plans a complete inspection
of the city, block by block, door to
door. Figuring 15 minutes to a
house, two afternoons to a block,
and working every afternoon,
Hunter -said the job would prob-
ably take him into June.
* * *
"ONLY multiple dwellings will
be investigated," he said. Under
the State Housing Law, a multiple
dwelling is a house where more
than two families are living, or
where a single family is taking
in three or more roomers. The in-
vestigation will affect only stu-
dent rooming houses, fraternity
and sorority houses, he said, but
not UniversityResidence Halls,
which are inspected by an insur-
ance company.
"There should be two means
of exit from each floor and a
fire escape on the third floor,"
Hunter said. "This mean: steel
fire escapes, not wooden lad-
ders and escape ropes," he em-
phasized.
Well qualified for his new job,
Hunter has been "investigating"
Exposed wooden floor joists on
basement ceilings will have to be
covered with lath and plaster, he
Last Day for
Play Tickets
Tickets for the Union theatre
trip to a Detroit showing of "A
Streetcar Named Desire" March 25
will be on sale for the last time
today, according to Union staff-
man Phil Johnson, '52E.
Priced at $3.65, the tickets cover
both theatre admission and round
trip bus fare to Detroit where the
hit play is about to begin a nine
day run at a downtown theatre.
Written by Tennessee Williams,
the Pulitzer prize winning play
is produced by Irene M. Selznick
and stars Judith Evelyn.
Tickets can be purchased from
3 to 5 p.m. at the Union box-
office. Buses for the trip will leave
the side of the Union at 12:30 p.
m. March 25 and are expected to
return before 7 p.m., Johnson
said.

added. And enclosed stairways are
a third "must."
for about ten years. Graduated
from the Illinois Institute of
Technology in 1940, he is now an
instructor in engineering mechan-
ics at the University.
Hunter has been "on the job"
for a week, and out of 35 dwellings
inspected, he has found 18 without
fire escapes and 14 open stair-
ways. The owners will be given 90
days to make the required im-
provements, he said.

7 LENTEN MEALS

... Corner Liberty & Fifth Streets

I

WANTED
Young Man
preferably with college back-
ground-interested in a future
in sales work. We can offer the
right man long hours, hard
work, and the opportunity to
advance with a growing com-
pony.
IMPERIAL
INDUSTRIES, Inc.
Wayne, Michigan
Phone Wayne 2350

I

ANN ARBOR FIGURE SKATING CLUB
presents 4
8th ANNUAL ICE CARNIVAL
4'MELOIJY ON ICE",
Cast of 1904
Saturday, March 18, 8:00 P.M. $1.00
(Students LD. Cards at Rink Only) only 75e
Sunday, March 19, 3:00 P.M. 75c
UNIVERSITY ICE RINK4
Tickets On Sale At:
Michigan Union, Ulrich's, Slater's,
Wahr's Bookstores, and Ice-Rink.

: i

A

J

4

~1

Lectures have recently become
clearer, and note taking less of a
chore for students in a number of
the larger Angell Hall classrooms.
These changes have resulted
from the installation of fluorescent
lighting and accoustical ceiling
tiling. Although the program only
began in early February, already
eight formerly dim, echoey class-
rooms have been done over.
THE FIRST FLOOR study hall
Concert Series
will Feature
Francescatti

Zile

All-inclusive budget tours for college students -
ample educational and- recreational activities - con-
genial English speaking local counselors

24 to 115) days - frequent departures between May
29 and July 24
Also credit-carrying summer sessions abroad and var-

and the third floor economics
reading room had been similarly
refurbished previously. Before
the program ends this spring, 23
of the largest AH classrooms will
have been renovated, as well as
the study hall and reading room.
Altogether, the total expen-
diture, taken out of University
maintenance funds, will be
around $44,000.
Though the need for this pro-
gram had long been felt by Uni-
versity officials, its carrying out
was blocked by the crowded con-
ditions in Angell. A classroom just
couldn't be spared for a whole
semester while it was being done
over.
But this problem was solved,
when Dean Lloyd S. Woodburne
of the literary college came up
with what is called a "floating
classroom system."
* * *
UNDER THIS SYSTEM, while
the plant department crew moves
in to do a room, the classes usual-
ly held there are transferred to
1209 Angell, which has been re-
served for classes evicted by the
improvement program. Using this
method, a classroom can be done
quite handily in three days.
The alterations, at least from
the viewpoint of Walter Roth,
plant superintendent, the man
who has overall direction of the
program, has gone along quite
smoothly.
"We've had good cooperation
from both faculty and students,"
he declared. "In fact, the program
is going along much better than
we thought it would."

it is of interest to every male student on campus that BETA MU continues to function.
BETA MU is now in its first year on campus. It was organized by students of
different races, religions, nationalities and geographic origins. They were dissatisfied
with the existing fraternity structure and decided to create an organization more repre-
sentative of the student body.
We believe that college fraternities should offer their members the brotherhood
of all students and therefore an opportunity for the fullest and most varied social and
intellectual development
The Democratic, enthusiastic nature of BETA MU makes available to every
member the unique experience of significantly assisting in creating and forming the
structure, ideals, and traditions of the organization.
We believe that here you will find a stimulating task whose successful completion
will benefit BETA MU and all students at the university.

77,itk>..

For further details come to our SMOKERS, March
March 18, Saturday, at 2 P.M. at the Michigan Union.

17, Friday, at 7:30 P.M., and

4

Write for free bulletin:
Association for Academic Travel Abroad,
(A non-profit organization)
42 Broadway, New York 4, N.Y.

Inc.

Zino Francescatti, distinguished
French violinist, will give the final
Choral Union Concert at 8:30 p.m.'
Monday, in Hill Auditorium.
Francescatti will be heard per-
forming Hindemith's "Sonata No.
2;" Bach's "Partita No. 2 (for
violin alone);" Milhaud's "Suite;"
Saint-Saens' "Havanaise" and
Sarasate's "Zigeunerweisen"
(Gypsy Airs).
The concert marks the second
Ann Arbor appearance by the
French virtuoso. He first per-
formed here in the 1945 May Fes-
tival.
Francescatti made his first pub-
lic appearance at five. At ten he
scored a musical triumph in the
Beethoven Concerto, and at 20
established himrielf as a great
violinist, through the success of
his formal debut with the Orches-
tra of the Concerts de Conserva-
toire at the Paris Opera.
In the fall of 1939, the Mar-
seilles-born virtuoso came to the
United States for the first time.
WUOM Presents
'Lace It Up' Story
WUOM's "Hello, Alumni" pro-
gram wil feature the story of "Lace
It Up," the 1950 Union Opera,
during the next two weeks, Wil-
liam Bender, Jr., script editor, an-
nounced yesterday.
First of the "Lace It Up" broad-
casts wil be offered at 5:45 p.m.
today.
Today's program will feature
Jim Ebersole, '50, student manager
of the Opera,

-/eta J11u

MONR

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