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March 14, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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TUESDAY, MARCH 14, 1950

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Campus Radio Network Seen Possible

Tribal Chief SUMMER VACATIONS WITH PAY:
Duped, Says Jobs Now Available at R(
' Summer jobs - resort work in I it operates as a sort of clearin

esorts, Camps

TTYESDAY, MAJUYH 14, 1950
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Seretse Khama, young African
tribal chief who married a white
woman, was tricked by the Brit-
ish into leaving :his tribe, accord-
ing to John Dickson, Grad.
Dickson, a native of West Afri-
ca now studying geo-politics at the
University, noted that Khama was
recently banished from his home
by the British Imperial Govern-
ment because of the marriage. The
banishment precipitated a rash of
intense criticism of the Imperial
Government by British leaders in
the House of Commons last week.
WINSTON CHURCHILL was
prompted to say, "It is a very dis-
creditable transaction."
Khama was requested by the
British to come to London, and
it was there that he found out
that the Imperial Government
had decided not to recognize his
election as chief of the Banan-
gwato tribe in Bechuanaland for
at least five years, and would
meanwhile bar him from the
territory, a British Protectorate
in South Africa.
Dickson said that the Imperial
Government did this because Kha-
ma and his wife are intent upon
leading the native peoples in a
crusade to secure their rights and
eventual independence, and the
British fear that they might lose
the rich diamond concessions that
they have in Kimberly.
"It is this sort of treatment
that is causing the natives of the
British African territories to feel
an intense hatred of the British.
And if they ever achieve self-
government they would never con-
sent to becoming a part of the
British Commonwealth of Nations.
This same imperialistic mistreat-
ment caused India and Burma to
throw aside their dominion status
recently and become absolutely in-
dependent republics," Dickson as-
serted.
TYPEWRITERS

beautiful vacation spots, camp
jobs by cool northern lakes, and
many more - are available to
the ambitious student through the
University Bureau of Appoint-
ments.
According to Roy E. Sommer-
feld, director of the department
dealing with summer employment,
Job-Seekers
Meet Today
Non-professional and non-tech-
nical men interested in discussing
general job possibilities will meet
at 4:10 p.m. today, Rm. 231, Angell
Hall.
Measures to be taken by both
the individual and the University
Bureau of Appointments in secur-
ing positions will be discussed.
All women on campus will par-
ticipate in a similar meeting at
4:10 p.m., Thursday, Rm. 231, An-
gell Hall.
Roy E. Sommerfeld of the Bur-
eau will be available from 9-12
and 2:15-4:30 p.m. Thursday in
Rm. 3B of the Union to confer
with any students interested in
summer jobs.

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hrntcp fnr ct.ttrlpnt: and PmnlM7P

uue ft. oiuue cau employer
needs.
AT THE BEGINNING of the
spring semester, a meeting is held
for prospective applicants. At that
time, each fills out a registration
card, dealing with job qualifica-
tions, preferences, and other ques-
tions which employers might ask.
Students who wish to register may
still do so, declared Sommerfeld.
The registration cards are kept
on file in the office at 3528 Ad-
ministration Building and em-
ployers may. come in and look
them over, Sommerfeld said.
Last year more than 800 appli-
cants were registered.

al hundred resorts and camps to
determine their employment needs.
The replies to these letters are
placed in folders where appli-
cants can come in and examine
them, and copy the addresses.
"Camp jobs, such as counsel-
ors, nurses; and waterfront di-
rectors, are much more in demand
than resort-type work," said Som-
merfeld, "but we have on file re-
quests from a number of resorts."
Students with questions about
job possibilities and summer em-
ployment in general may have
them answered by Sommerfeld, 9
to 12 a.m. and 2 to 4 p.m. Thurs-
day, in Rm. 3B, Union.

First History
Club Meeting
CalledToday
A call for all graduates inter-
ested in history to attend the or-
ganizational meeting of the Grad-
uate History Club, to be held at
8 p.m. today in the East Council
Room of the Rackham Building,
.was issued by member Howard
Kline.
The program will feature a dis-
cussion of last semester's activi-
ties by retiring president Margaret
Larsen, Grad.
The club has been reactivated
this year after a lapse of interest
during the war, Kline commented.

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RENTED
SOLD
BOUGHT
REPAIRED

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II

G.l. Requisitions
Accepted on Supplies Only
MORRILL'S
314 S. State St. Ph. 7177
fountain pens repaired

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