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March 12, 1950 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ThrE1VTC c11N DAILY

OK AT CATALOGUE!:
Details Foil Graduation
Attempts of 200 Seniors
P ,

By DAVE THOMAS
senior's lot is often not a
y one.
iughly 200 members of the
of '50 have already been
cened to this unhappy fact so
his semester and are fidget-
through interviews with the
s of their various colleges to
f they please can't graduate in
after all.
* * *
IE 200 unfortunates have been
ed up by unfulfilled gradua-
requirements from anemic

credit -hour totals to uncompleted
physical education requirements.
And a further check may swell
the number even higher, ac-
cording to assistant Registrar
Edward G. Groesbeck.
Three recorders in the Regis-
trar's office are assigned to the
senior records, and in the process
of recording grades, also check to
see that those seniors who have
applied for diplomas have satis-
fied the necessary requirements.
* , *

to% WOOL
- - A.

STUDENTS with deficiencies
are notified as soon as possible
and feferred to their deans to
nake whatever arrangements pos-
sible, Groesbeck, said. These ar-
rangements sometimes consist of
an extra semester or summer ses-
sion !
Chief cause for all the trouble
is that students apparently don't
like to read the catalogue, he
pointed out. "Advisors are there
to help but the major responsi-
bility lies with the student.
"Take a look at your transcript
eveiy now and then so that you
kmow where you stand," the of-
ficial warned.
ANOTHER PROBLEM looms on
the immediate horizon, however,
for after a more thorough re-
checking, the office will post ten-
tative diploma lists.
"This," says Groesbeck resign-
edly, "always brings a flood of
protesting would-be alumni who
have neglected to fill out diploma
applications. We have to go
through the whole process all over
again for them."
German Letters
Planned by SL
Arrangements for correspon-
dence between University students
and students at a German col-
lege are being made by Student
Legislature, according to SL pres-
ident Quentin Nesbitt, '50 BAd.
Nesbitt said he received a letter
this week from an officer of the
student governing body of George
August University, British Zone,
Germany, asking for correspon-
dence with students here.
"It's a great chance for Amer-
ican students to learn first hand
the how, what and when of Uni-
versity life in Germany, and at
the same time gain an under-
standing of the German people
and their problems," he asserted.
Nesbitt urged students interest-
ed in the project to contact the
Student Legislature office, 1020
Administration Building, from 3
to 5 p.m. weekday afternoons. SL
hopes to reply to the German uni-
versity as soon as possible, he
added.

-Daily-Carlyle Marshall
POLISH STUDENT-Henry Rubinstein, '51E, transferred to the\
University this semester from the Technological University in
Munich to study electrical engineering, on a World Student
Service Fund scholarship.
* * * *
Polish Student Desires
To Become U.S. Citizen

Adams Sees
- -0
Possibility o
0 Expansion
Junior Collegoes
In Same Posit ion.
The University has no desire to
become larger for the sake of size,
but it may be forced to take an
increasing number of students in
the future to meet its educational
responsibilities, Provost James P.
Adams said yesterday.
Provost Adams addressed 60
representatives from 10 Michigan
junior coleges who gathered in
the Union for a Junior College
Conference.
"NO ONE CAN SAY just how
the larger educational needs of
the state will distribute them-
selves in the future. But the Uni-
versity existshas an agency of the
state and must measure its ser-
vice by the nature and sizeof
state needs," Adams declared.
He noted tha junior colleges,
too, must take their share of the
responsibility for expanding
educational facilities so that the
impact of larger numbers will
not fall upon the larger insti-
tutions alone. In turn, the Uni-
versity has a special responsi-
bility to train junior college
teachers.
"Because junior colleges are
community colleges, they must be
more responsive to community
needs than other educational in-
stitutions," he added.
LISTING four functions of the
junior college, Adams pointed out
that these institutions must do
more than provide the first two
college years preparatory to higher
education.
He said that junior colleges must
also fit community needs by pro-
viding two year terminal pro-
grams,- adult education and post
high school vocation programs.
News Broadcast
The speech department's 15-
minute newscast, formerly heard
at 12:30 p.m., is now broadcast at
2 p.m. Monday through Friday
over Station WHRV, according to
Prof. Garnet Garrison.

New'Gilbert and Sullivan' Cast Named

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Star of

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WOOLS
at
10.95

Bill Boyer, '50 SM, musical di-
rector for the forthcoming Gilbert
and Sulilvan Society production
of "lolanthe," yesterday an-
nounced the names of persons
chosen for prinicipal roles in the
light opera.
Fresh from his success as
Frederic in last semester's "Pi-
rates of Penzance," Reid Shelton,
Grad, will play Lord Tolloller in

I '

"lolanthe." Joan Zapf, '52 SM,
wil have the title role of Iolanthe.
The production also feature
Gloria Gonan as the Fairy
Queen; Ruth Campbell, '50 SM
as Celia; Shirley Perloff, '52 as
Leila; Jack Jenson, Grad, as
Strephon, the hero; Jim Ueber-
horst, '52 L as the Lord Chancel-
lor and Dave Murray, '53 SM as

By JOAN WILLENS
Well pleased after spending
eight months in the United States,
Henry Rubinstein, '51E, from Po-
land, maintains he has no desire
to live in Europe, and plans to be-
come an American citizen as soon
as possible.
Rubinstein obtained a World
Student Service Fund scholarship
and transferred to the University
this semester to complete his stu-
dies in electrical engineering. He
lives at the Zeta Beta Tau house,
where his living expenses are pro-
vided for by the fraternity.
* * *
THE twenty-year-old student
was living in Lodz, Poland, when
the Germans invaded his country
in 1939. Forced to live in con-
centration camps, he witnessed
and endured some of the worst
horrors of the war, but he relates
his story calmly. /
Early in 1940, the Germans
forced, under threat of being
shot, the 120,000 Jewish citi-
zens of Lodz to move to the
ghetto, which was the dirtiest
section of the city, his story be-
gins.
When Russia started her offen-
sive campaign, the Jews were
transported from the ghetto to
the Aushewitz concentration camp,
surrounded by deadly high vol-
tage wire fences, he continued.
* * *
THE CAMP had originally been
the stables for the Polish cavalry
horses, and the prisoners lived in
the gold horse stalls, 1,000 men
jammed into a stable built for 30
. orses, Rubinstein estimated.

"It was so crowded we couldn't
lie down, unless we slept on
top of one another, and even
then it was unbearably cramp-
ed," he related.
Ten days later Rubinstein and
his father, who had been separated
from his mother, were trans-
ferred to the Gross-Rosen-Fried-
land concentration camp in lower
Silesia for ten months.
* ** *
"WHEN WE ARRIVED there,
we had to pass before an army
physician, who arbitrarily desig-
nated those who looked too weak
to wo'k and sent them ',to be
burned in the crematorium. It
was just a matter of luck to be
allowed to live," he said.
Rubinstein was reunited with
his family soon afterwards. Dis-
satisfied with the restrictive com-
munistic regime set up in Poland.
they moved to Munich, Germany.
* *
HENRY explained his interest
in electrical engineering by saying
"mathematics was always my
favorite subject and I wanted to
combine what I liked with some-
thing practical - so electricity
was the answer." He studied at
the Technological University in
Munich a year before coming to
the United States.
About the present situation in
Poland. Henry said "officially Po-
land is free. You can say what
you want, but you never know
what will happen to you later. All
initiative is suppressed. You can
start a business, but the imposed
taxes will probably be. twice as
high as your profits."

'.
4inei~ t a1ltijat price-J

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Private Willis.
"golanthe" is the story of a
group of fairies who exert a
strange influence-over top-ranking
British government officials, un-
til they finally win control of
Parliament.
"Iolanthe" will be presented May
12, 13 and 14 in Pattengill Audi-
torium.

41

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