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March 12, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

t

SUNDAY, XWARCH 12, 1950

..
,

--mm-mmilim

OGNYEliminates
* * * * * *t*A* i*
1aSalle, Western Kentucky Also Victors

San

rancisco

'in

NIT, ner

western Ontario Gives Wolverines Scare4
- Before P owing in Hard Fought Struggle

BULLETIN

NEW YORK - (P) - Syra-
ise upset favored Long Island
nlversity, 80-52, last night to
ain the quarter-final round of
ie National Invitation Basket-
ill Tournament along with
Vestern Kentucky, City College
f New York and La Salle.
NEW YORK - 0P) La Salle
Philadelphia drew away in the

final six minutes last night to de-I
feat' the Arizona Wildcats, 72-66,
in the opening round of the Na-
tional Invitation Basketball Tour-+
nament.
The victory sent La Salle against
Duguesne in the first game of
Tuesday night's doubleheader.
Duquesne, one of the four seeded
teams, drew a first round bye.
* * *
LA SALLE thus joined Western
Kentucky and City College of New

ANN ARBOR FIGURE SKATING CLUB
8th ANNUAL ICE CARNIVAL
"M6VELODY ONl ICE"
Cast of 190
Saturday, March 18, 8:00 P.M. $1.00
(Students I.D. Cards at Rink Only) only 75e
Sunday, March 19, 3:00 P.M. 75c
UNIVERSITY ICE RINK
Tickets On Sale At:
Michigan Union, Ulrich's, Slater's,
Wahr's Bookstores, and Ice-Rink.

York in the victory column. West-
ern Kentucky defeated Niagara,
79-72, and CCNY eliminated San
Francisco - defending champions
- 65-46, in afternoon games.
A sellout crowd of 18,000 wit-
nessed the Arizona-La Sallt tilt,
which was to be followed by the
final game of the day between
Long Island and Syracuse.
CCNY's next opponent is Ken-
tucky, the no. 2 team in the coun-
try and seeded second, on Tuesday
night. Western goes against St.
John's of Brooklyn, fourth seeded,
Monday night.
THE FOUR seeded teams -
Bradley, Kentucky, Duquesne and
St. John's - were idle in the
opening round, having drawn byes.
The some 18,000 fans who
packed Madison Square Garden
were treated to two remarkable
individual performances dur-
ing the matinee session.
Bob Lavoy, Western Kentucky's
six-foot-seven center from Aurora,
Ill., almost personally ousted
Niagara with his dazzling shoot-
ing.
ALTHOUGH a bit wild in the
game's early stages, he finally
found the range to ring up 32
points, including 12 field goals.
He has scored more than 600
points this year and has a 44
LATE SCORES.
NHL
Detroit 5, Chicago 1
Montreal 5, Boston 0
Toronto 4, New York 0
SWIMMING
Wisconsin 43, Indiana 41
BASKETBALL
Princeton 60, Penn. 59
Oklahoma 52, Kansas 49
Missouri 53, Colorado 49

bound play with Michigan's
Mnnes lying on the. ice
saving on Ted Pritchett.

Jack
after

Gabor set up the next Ontario
goals at 17:57. He handed the
puck to Jimmy Black who got
behind the Wolverine defense
and neatly faked out McInnes...
Sophomore Eddie May got one
of those goals back a little later
to end the scoring for the period.
THE PLAY followed a face-off
in center ice in which Paul Pelow
and Bob Heathcott handled the
puck before May found himself
past the defense. He beat Hains-
worth on a clean ten-footer.
The Mustangs really started
rolling as the second period got
under way and had the Wolver-
ines rocking for a few minutes.

(Continued from Page 1)

The Wolverines finally got or-
ganized and Gil Burford missed a
beautiful chance near the middle'
of the session after Neil Celley
had slipped him the disc right in
front of the Mustang goal.
* * *:
THE, RESURGENT Mustangs
quickly capitalized on Ross Smith's
charging penalty at 15:22 to come
within one to knotting the score.
Captain and center Keith
Phillips rifled a fifteen footer
through a maize of players fol-
lowing a melee in front of the
Michigan cage.
The action was pretty even in
the final stanza with both goalies
forced to come up with nice stops.
* * *
AT 15:21 Keyes completed his
"hat trick" with a hard shot from
about forty feet. Louie Paolatto
was given an assist on the play

that appeared to ice the contest
for Michigan.
Undaunted, the visitors click-
ed again at 18:38 with Smith
again off, this time for an illegal
body check.
Gabor connected on a fifteen
shot after a scramble around the
Wolverine goal.
In the waning seconds of the
contest the Mustangs turned on
the pressure and narrowly missed
tying up the game.
Michigan was handicapped
somewhat due to an illness to Gra-
ham Cragg. Cragg came up with
a virus infection yesterday and
could not play.
The saves were about even with
McInnes having to stop 22 Mus-
tang attempts and Hainsworth 25
Wolverine shots.

1

EARL KEYES
.. three goals

4

WALLY GRANT:
... three assists

Latest Exhibition Baseball Results

-A

i

-n,

y

YOU ARE INVITED TO ATTEND
A FREE LECTURE ENTITLED
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE:
THE SCIENCE OF GOD'S
ABUNDANT PROVISION

by HAROLD MOLTER, C.S.B., of Chicago, Illinois
Member of the Board of Lectureship of The Mother Church,
The First Church of Christ, Scientist,
in Boston, Massachusetts.

per cent hitting average on field
goals.
The other heroic performance
was turned in by Ed Warner, a
six - foot - two - and - a - half - inch
sophomore forward for CCNY.
San Francisco couldn't seem to
solve the antics of this 200-pound
athlete who repeatedly tore un-
der the basket and hit the mesh
through a maze of enemy arms.
Warner's afternoon inventory
showed eight field goals and ten
free throws for 26 points.

CLEARWATER, FLA., - (R) -
Extra base hits were as plentiful as
oranges here yesterday as the De-
troit Tigers dropped a 10-inning
9-8 decision to the Philadelphia
Phillies in their opening exhibition
game.
Seventeen hits, nine of them
good for more than one base,
rattled off Tiger bats with Hoot
Evers and Dick Kryhoski lead-
ing the attack.
But while the Tigers were
swinging lustily, Philadelphia al-
so was contributing some heavy
stickwork. The Phillies got 13
hits, six of them for extra bases.
Young Art Houtteman was the
only one of six pitchers to remain
unscored on in the carnage as he
blanked the Phils in the first three
innings.
Ted Gray who took over for
the Tigers in the fourth had a very
rough time as the home club de-
lighted 4,157 fans by pummeling
him for seven runs in three inn-
ings.
TUCSON, ARIZ., - (A) - Driv-
ing in four runs in the eighth inn-
ing, the New York Giants defeated
Cleveland's Indians 5 to 3 yes-
terday as the two clubs launched
their exhibition season.
There was some cause for re-
joicing in the tribe camp, however,
as southpaw Gene Bearden showed
signs of returning to his 1948
form. Although charged with the
loss, Bearden allowed only four
hits in five innings and gave up
but one walk.
WEST PALM BEACH, FLA., -
(P) - Rookie outfielder Ben Guin-
tini from Dallas smacked a double
and single and drew a walk yes-
terday to lead the Philadelphia
Athletics to a 7 to 3 victory over
the Washington Senators.
Washington started off as it
to make the opening Grapefruit
League game of Connie Mack's
50th year as a manager an un-
happy one for the A's manager.
The Senators got three runs off
lefty Lou Brissie.
ST. PETERSBURG, FLA., (A)
-- Taking advantage of six er-
rors, the New York Yankees de-
feated the St. Louis Cardinals in,

the opener of their spring exhibi-
tion series today, 15-4. A crowd
of 7,701,second largest ever to
attend a game here, saw four of
Eddie Dyer's hurlers pounded for
17 hits. George Stirnweiss, with
three singles, paced the Bombers'
attack.
The New York pitchers, Fred
Sanford, Wally Hood and Don
Johnson held St. Louis to four
blows, one a homer by Marty
Marion. Joe Dimaggio, playing
five innings, was held to a single
in three times at bat.
* * *
MIAMI, FLA., - () - The Bos-
ton Braves exploded with a six-
run ninth inning yesterday for a
9-3 victory over the National
League Champion Brooklyn Dodg-
ers, as the teams opened their
spring exhibition game series be-

fore 10,384 fans in the new Miami
Stadium. The clubs were dead-
locked 3-3 going into the final
frame with bonus pitcher Billy
Loes on the mound for Brooklyn.
Boston knocked him off with five
hits and half a dozen runs.
SARASOTA, FLA., - (R) - The
Boston Red Sox, paced by -the hit-
ting of Al Zarilla, launched their
Florida Grapefruit League sea-
son successfully yesterday by de-
feating the Cincinnati Reds 3 to
1 before a record crowd of 3,666
fans at Payne Field.
The Reds jumped into a quick
first inning lead, when Johnny
Wyrostek lashed Joe Dobson's ini-
tial pitch deep down the left field
line for a triple and scored on
Grady Hatton's long fly to cen-
ter.

.

J
4c

S
Big Ten Officials Discuss Rose
Bowl Pact, 1951 Cage Slate

RACKHAM LECTURE HALL

Monday, March 13, 1950

8:00 P.M.

Under auspices of the Christian Science Organization
at the University of Michigan

HAIRSTYLING at your convenience
Our ladies haircutters will trim,
shorten or thin your hair to a
style that is becoming. Queries in-
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The DASCOLA BARBERS
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r-.j

P.

.........-

"A MEMORY FOREVER"
sI1U l
so wh dep~rtve your lovedones of h n

CHICAGO - (W) - The Big Ten
gave final approval yesterday to
a 14-game Conference basketball
schedule for 1951 and proposed
new legislation to tighten eligibil-
ity standards, including a ban of
prep athletes who sign pro con-
tracts before matriculating.
The faculty representatives ap-
proved the first 14-game card in
league history for next season
when new member Michigan State
will make its debut. The confer-
ence in the past mainly has play-
ed a. 12-game schedule.
* * *
RENEWAL of the Rose Bowl
pact with the Pacific Coast'Con-
ference was studied, but no action
is scheduled until the May confer-
ence meeting.
The Rose Bowl subject was
aired as Commissioner K. L.
(Tug) Wilson reported on a
Big Ten-Pacific Coast Confer-
ence committee meeting held at
New York Jan. 13.
It was merely in the exploratory
realm, Wilson said, adding that it
was hoped that whatever play-
ing agreement-such" as a pro-
posed two-year'ban on °a bowl ap-

pearance by the same school - -
was fixed by one conference, it
would be followed by the other.
THE BIG TEN has had a three-
year restriction on a bowl return
in the current five-year pact which
ends with next year's game.
Wilson received Conference
authority to assign a fifth "emer-
gency" official to each Confer-
ence football game. The extra
official will suit up and be on
hand should injury or some
other cause remove a regular
whistle-blower.
The faculty group, policy-mak-
ing body of the Conference, re-
commended a progress rule for
athletes in the class-room, re-
quiring them to advance at least
40 per cent towards their degree
for a second competitive season
and 60 per cent for a third season
of eligibility. This is to compel
athletes to be bona fide students
and prevent dropping out of school
for periods to extend eligibility.
*I *I *
THE FACULTY members pro-
posed to -bear down on prep ath-
letes who have signed professional
sports contracts, before matricu-
lating at college. Extenuating cir-
cumstances, however, including
failure to receive payment for
signing, will be recognized for re-
instatement.

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6. ALL PARTS
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year (Most models include 3-speed)
On display at
GLENN'S TAYLOR SHOP
East U. opposite University High
COME IN FOR A DEMONSTRATION RIDE
2-5:30 Mon.-Fri., 10-5:30 Sat.)

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7

II

LA SOCIEDAD HISPANICA
presents
a comedy in two acts
by ALVAREZ QUINTERO
(Spain's outstanding humorist)

I

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