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March 11, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-4

T~HE M'I~A ~T~

_ .- ATh1DAT, WAR41 11, 1950

Relgion in ife1
Well-Known
Speakwes To
1 Virkapus
SRA Sponsors
ReligiousTalks
A distinguished bill of speakers,
ieaded by lecturer- commentator
Dorothy Thompson, will confront
ampus audiences tonmorriow
hrough Thursday during Religion
n Life Week, under the auspices
f the Student Religious Associa--

Week

To pen

Launching the seminar sessions
at 4 p.m. Monday, with a discus-
sion on "The Christian Faith and
its Contemporary Alternatives,"
will be the Rev. Dr. V. R. T. Ferm,
Cancellation
The Rev. Arnold Nash, head
of the department of religion
at the University of North Car-
olina, scheduled to give a semi-
nar lecture on "The Place of
Religion in Higher Education''
at 4:10 p.m. Thurs. in Rack-
ham, will be unable to appear
due to illness, the Student Re-
ligious Association announced
yesterday.
head of the Wooster College, 0.,
philosophy department.
"A PHILOSOPHER'S Approach
to Faith" will be the subject of
the Rev. Dr. Robert Smith's 4:00
p.m. Monday seminar. Chairman
of the philosophy department,
Dubuque University, Ia., and
Presbyterian minister, Dr. Smith
will also conduct a seminar on
"Faith Speaks to World Prob-
lems" on Tuesday.
The Rev. Dr. Milton Froyd,
director of research at the Col-
gate-Rochester Divinity School,
will discuss the "New Testament
in the Twentieth Century" in
another seminar session 4:00
p.m. Tuesday at the Rackham
Building.
Wednesday the Rev. Dr. John
S. Everton, president of Kalama-
zoo College, will discuss "Faith and
Christian America" 5:10 p.m. at
the Congregational Church.
Dr. Everton returned from India
in 1945, where he was senior repre-
sentative of the American Friends
Service Committee. "The Hydro-
gen Bomb and World Peace," will
be the topic of Dr. Everton's sec-
ond formal lecture 4:00 p.m.
Thursday in the League's Hender-
son Room._

DR. JOHN SCOTT EVERTON
RELIGION IN LIFE:

REV. DR. GRESHAM
* * *

Educators, Editors, Religious
Leaders To Head Discussions

Religion in Life Week forums
and discussions will be led by reli-
gious workers in the fields of edu-
cation, business and public lec-
turing, as well as religion.
Co mittee
Calls Students
Of All aFiths
As ,the first Religion in Life
week to include all religious faiths
represented here on campus gets
under way Sunday. the Inter-
Faith Student Executive Commit-
tee has issued a call to all stu-
dents, seeking a personal faith to
live by, to lay aside their books
and take an inspirational part in
the coming week's events.
"The inspiration of the out-
standing religious leaders assem-
bled here, coupled with that which
will be offered by many other
worthwhile activities," the Com-
mittee's statement reads, "affords
every student a rich opportunity
to evolve his own personal faith."
Religion in Life week, sponsor-
ed by the Student Religious As-
sociation and Campus Religious
Council, is supported by the fol-
lowing religious groups:
The Christian Scientists, Luth-
erans (Missouri Synod), Greek
Orthodox, Hillel (Jewish), Inter-
Guild (11 Protestant guilds), Lat-
ter Day Saints, Newman Club
(Roman Catholic) and the Uni-
tarians.

Among those speaking will be
The Rev. Dr. Perry E. Greshan
of the Central Woodward Christ-{
ian Church in Detroit, professor
of philosophy for six years at Tex-
as Christian University.
* * *
DR. JOHN SCOTT EVERTON,
president of Kalamazoo College
who combines education, adminis-
tration and the ministry, will also
address groups. Prior to becoming
head of Kalamazoo College last
year, he taught at Grinnell Col-
lege, Grinnell, Ia.
Gesorge Romney, president of
the West Detroit branch of the
Church of Jesus Christ of Lat-
ter Day Saints and vice-presi-
dent of the Nash-Kelvinator
Corporation, is scheduled to
lead several discussions.
A former missionary to the Bri-
tish Isles, he was also a director of
the Automobile Manufacturers'
Association.
* * *
FORUM LEADER James Watt,
Christian Science Chaplain for
four years, is manager of the
Washington, D. C. office of the
Christian Science Committee on
Publication.
Dr. Robert Smith, chairman
of the Department of Philoso-
phy at the University of Dubu-
que, Dubuque, Ia., will also be
present for Religion in Life
Week.
Editor of Lutheran youth maga-
zine Walther League Messenger,
Rev. Alfred Klausler--Army chap-
lain in World War II-is another
minister attending.

Tradition Set
19 Years Ao
To Continue
This year's Religion in Life
Week follows a tradition set in
February, 1931, when a "Religious
Emphasis Week" was held - and
at which it was predicted that
"universal religion was on the
horizon,"andeatomicwenergy was
discussed.
The tradition was revived with
last year's Religion in Life Week.
LAST YEAR'S programs includ-
ed a large battery of well-known
speakers from the clergy and other
fields, among them T. Z. Koo, ad-
visor to the Chinese delegation to
the 1945 San Francisco conference
and George P. Gilmour, chancel-
lor of McMaster University in On-
tario.
Mrs. Vera Smith Lowrie, a
sociologist and Prof. Joseph Sit-
tier of the Chicago Theological
Seminary were among the other
speakers.
Rev. Kiyoshi Tanimoto, a sur-
vivor of the Hiroshima A-bomb
explosion and founder of the
Hiroshima Peace Association and
Raymond John Seegar, a physicist
who worked on the Bikini A-bomb
testsspoke on the implications of
the A-bomb.
SUBJECTS of the 1931 Religious
Emphasis Week ranged from "The
Mastery of Fear" to a prophetic
discussion of atomic power.
It was President James King
of Olivet College who spoke on
the subject of fear. And Allynj
K. Foster, a Baptist lecturer
spoke on atomic energy.
He "brought out the wonder and
divine significance of atomic
structure and emphasized the
point that as the atom draws its
energy from some vast reservoir
of physical power, so the human
spirit can get in touch with an im-
measurable source of divine pow-
er-,
Other talks were given on "The
Striking Personalities of Modern
Germany," by Harry N. Holmes of
the World Alliance for Interna-
tional Friendship, and the noted
humanist Curtis W. Reese on "Can
a Scientist be a Churchman?"
Fred B. Smith, moderator of
the National Council of Congre-
gational Churches, predicted that
universal religion was on the hori-
zon.
Churches Plan
SpecialRites
A number of local churches will
hold special services during Reli-
gion in Life week.
Holy Sacrifice of the Mass will
be held at St. Mary's Student Cha-
pel, at 8, 9:30, 11 and 12 a.m. to-
morrow and at 7, 8 and 9 a.m.
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.
The Rev. Dr. John S. Everton
will speak at 10:45 a.m. tomorrow
at the F i r s t Congregational
Church, 608 E. William.
The Memorial Christian Church,
815 Hill, will have a service at
10:50 a.m. tomorrow, with Dr. U.
R. T. Ferm as the speaker.
The First Church of Christ, Sci-
entist, 1833 Washtenaw, will hold
a service at 11 a.m. tomorrow.
Protestant Devotional Services
and breakfasts will be given from
7 to 8 a.m. Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday at the Methodist.

Church.

Delegates of
Jr. Colleges
To Meet Today
Sixty representatives from ten
Michigan junior colleges will meet
on campus today to discuss prob-
lems in higher education.
Dr. Clyde Vroman, director of
admissions, is in charge of the
conference and will preside at the
opening session, scheduled for 10
a.m. in Room 3-RS of the Union.
THE MEETING will then break
up into discussion groups dealing
with liberal arts, engineering, busi-
ness administration, music, archi-
tecture and forestry. Problems of
admissions, counseling, transfers
and student affairs will also be
discussed.
University Provost James P.
Adams will speak on "The Place
of Junior Colleges in the Edu-
cational Structure" at a lunch-
eon slated for 12:15 p.m.
New afternoon discussion groups
will treat problems on the nursing,
pharmacy, education and academ-
ic record-keeping fields.
Represented at the meeting will
be junior colleges in Bay City,
Flint, Port Huron, Highland Park,
Dearborn, Jackson, Grand Rapids,

DOROTHY THOMPSON
Newswoman
lInaugurate
Series at Hill.
Columnist Dorothy Thompson
will be featured in a panel of 11
speakers during Religion in Life
Week, which begins tomorrow.
Miss Thompson will speak on
"Religion in The World Crisis,"
at 8:30 p.m. Monday at Hill Au-
ditorium.
Well known as a political com-
mentator and columnist, Miss
Thompson is read in newspapers
Sacross the country in the Bell
Syndicate. She has written for
the New York Herald Tribune and
other syndicated newspapers since
1936.
Commenting on Franco Spain's
chances of becoming a free state
by the United Nations, Miss
Thompson remarked: ". . . a gen-
uinely free Spain cannot be cre-
ated by the UN, because the in-
terests of the great powers cross
in the Mediterranean. That hope,
like many others, is a casualty of
the destruction of the Atlantic
Charter."
Miss Thompson holds seven
honorary degrees from colleges
in the United States and Canada
and is an honorary member of
Phi Beta Kappa.
A reception will be held in her
honor after her talk in Lane Hall.
Women may obtain 11:30 p.m.
permission on application to the
Dean of Women today.
PaneI on Religion
o e Broadcast
Religion and Life week will be
the topic of a panel discussion
by the Interfaith Executive Com-
mittee, to be broadcast at 4:15
p.m. Monday over WHRV, Joanne
Smith, Lane Hall program direc-
tor announced yesterday.

Fritz Reiner to Conduct
Chicago Symphony Here

A.

The Chicago Symphony Orches-
tra, with FritzrReiner as guest
conductor, will present the last of
this year's extra series concerts at
7 p.m. tomorrow, Hill Auditorium,
Books Sought
To Aid Ferris
A call for books to re-stock the
library of burned-out Ferris In-
stitute has already brought a large
number of used books into the do-
nation pile at the General Library,
according to director Warner G.
Rice.
"At the present rate we should
be able to treble our donation
goal," Prof. Rice said.
He urged all who wished to
contribute books to bring them
in as soon as possible.
The institute is well on its way
to recovering from the disastrous
fire which swept campus build-
ings three weeks ago, according
to Prof. Rice who visited the
school recently.
Classes are being held in the
Alumni Building and army surplus
wooden barracks have been taken
over for library and bookstore
facilities.
More than 1,000 students are
attending the school, specializ-
ing in business administration,
pharmacy and education.
Officials hope to resume classes
this week and with the help of
greater state aid and donations
of equipment from other Michigan
schools, carry on its 66 year tra-
dition.

Known to American audiences
principally as a symphony con-
ductor Fritz Reiner gained wide
acclaim in opera as well.
STARTING HIS opera direction
career as a singing coach at his
native Budapest opera, he filled in
as director of "Carmen" at 18,
when the regular director became
ill.
"It was sink or swim," Reiner
said. . . . "I swam."
He soon became a conductor
in Budapest, then director of
the Dresden Opera and an au-
thority on Wagner, Richard
Strauss and Mozart.
After Reiner conducted his first
"Salome" he won the admiration
of the composer Richard Strauss
whose "Frau ohne Schatten" he
was first to perform.
IN 1922 Reiner arrived in the
United States to take over the
Cincinnati Symphony and give it
nine of the best years of its life.
Between 1938 and the spring
of 1948, while he moulded the
Pittsburgh Symphony into a
major-league orchestra, he ap-
peared as guest conductor of vir-
tually all the leading orchestras
of the country.
Reiner is well known to the pub-
lic through radio, recordings and
his movie appearance in "Carnegie
Hall." At tomorrow's concert,
Reiner will direct works by Wag-
ner, Beethoven, Cassella and
Schumann.
A limited number of tickets are
still available at the offices of the
University Musical Society, Bur-
ton Tower.

104

f

,y,
'e

4

Benton Harbor, Muskegon
Spring Arbor.
Heads Players
Burt Sapowitch, '51, has
re-elected president of the
dent Players.

and

been
Stu-

Carroll McCortney, '53, was cho-
sen vice president and Judy Sing-
er, '52, corresponding secretary.

t

4

1/,

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN
(Disciples of Christ)

CHURCH

State Faced With $90,000,000 Deficit;
Gov. Williams Proposes Corporate Tax

By RON LINTON
(Of Our Lansing Bureau)
LANSING-Where to get $90
million dollars?
That is the $90 million question
members of the Senate Finance
and House Ways and Means Com-
mittees are asking each other.
State lawmakers on the two
committees are now in their sec-
ond week of trying to prepare ap-
propriation bills which they hope
to have ready when the entire leg-
islature convenes March 15.
* * * .
ROUGHLY the problem is this:
Gov. G. Mennen Williams
wants to spend $320,000,000. But
the estimated revenue this year
is only $230,000,000. Result is a
$90 million deficit.
Leaders of both parties agree
that the state cannot have a $90
million deficit but they don't agree
,n how to prevent it.
DEMOCRATS SAY the only
thing to save the day is a new
corporations profit tax.
Republicans say less spending
and tighter tax collection meth-
ods will do the trick.
Of course both parties agree
that less diversion on the sales
tax will solve the problem also,
and some Republicans are calling
for a change in the sales tax law.
BUT THE length of time it
would take and the process neces-
sary to change this law makes it
obvious to even the layman that
this would never help out this year.I
And this is the important year.
The state has a -balance left
from last year totaling a little
over S90 million.
This $90 million not only has
been eaten up but some $12 to $16
Aromatic Reading
Rooms 'o Say

million that the state hasn't got
will be spent.
In other words the State of
Michigan is in the red.
* 4 *
THIS THEN is the situation
that committeemen on the House
Ways and Means Committee and
Senate Finance Committee are
grappling with at the present
time.
The committees are consider-
ing everything short of new
taxes to prevent the deficit.
They say the people back home
are violently opposed to any
corporation tax and that a legis-
lator would be committing polit-
ical suicide if he voted for such
a bill.
Gov. Williams met with mem-
bers of both committees recently
in the state supreme court cham-
bers. At that time Williams at-
tempted to explain the financial
picture from the administration
side.
* * *
ONE COMMITTEEMAN asked
J-Hop Pictures
All remaining J-Hop pictures
may be picked up at a photo-
graphy shop at 636 S. State St.,
according to Joan Broomfield of
the J-Hop committee.

Williams if he would request the
legislature to pass the highly con-
troversial corporation tax. The
governor declined to comment.
"I cannot tell you about a tax
program until we know exactly
what the anticipated revenues
will be," Williams said. "The es-
timate of revenues is preliminary
and not official."
It is interesting to note here
that in the third section of the
budget released by the governors
office last week the governor said:
"I will recommend a corporation
profits tax at a rate sufficient to
meet these and other needs."
CAPITOL political observers
look at Williams failure to recom-
mend a specific tax rate on cor-
porations, such as the 4% he rec-
ommended last year, as a conces-
sion to Republicans.
They point out that if Wil-
liams can convince the GOP that
they are setting the tax the Re-
publicans might do it. The one
catch is that the tax question
would become a confused onefor
campaigning purposes since both
parties could claim it was theirs.
However, these same observers
feel that Williams campaign for
reelection will be on the "Welfare
State" issue.

TRY
OUR EVERYDAY
CHEF SPECIALS
from
Soup to Dessert
$1.50
LLENEL
AM * R0
Iff##g

Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Earl Grandstaff, Acting Minister
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
9:45 A.M.: Student Class.
10:50 A.M.: Morning Worship. Guest speaker,
Professor Vergilius Ferm on campus for Re-
ligion and Life Week. (This service will be
broadcast over WHRV.) Nursery for children
during the service.
GUILD HOUSE: 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Minister to Students
Jean Garee, Associate
Student Guild: 6:00 supper at this church. Re-
ligion and Life Week guest speaker, Dr. Milton
Froyd, Director of Research at Colgate Roches-
ter Divinity School will speak on "Psychological
Requisites for Christian Living."
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Av.
W. P. Lemon and W. H. Henderson, Ministers
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
Mildred Beam, Church School Director
9:30 A.M.: Westminster Guild Bible Seminar.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Dr. Lemon will
preach a Lenten sermon entitled "The Glory
of the Twice-Born."
4:15 P.M.: The Chancel Choir will present
Brahms, "A German Requiem," directed by
Maynard Klein.
5:30 P.M.: Westminster Guild supper.
6:30 P.M.: Religion in Life Week Speaker will
be Dr. V. T. A. Ferm of the College of Wooster.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday morning Services. Subject,
Mar. 12-Substance.
9:15 A.M.: Sunday school.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Services.
A free reading room is maintained at 211 East
Washington Street where the Bible and all
authorized Christian Science literature may be
read, borrowed, or purchased.
This room is open daily, except Sundays and
holidays, from 11:30 to 5 P.M.; on Saturdays
until 9 P.M.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
National Lutheran Council
1304 Hill Street
Henry O. Yoder, D.D., Pastor
9:10 A.M.: Bible Class at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Services in Zion and Trinity
Churches.
5:30 P.M.: L.S.A. Supper Meeting in Zion
Lutheran Parish Hall. Speaker-Dr. John
Scott Everton, President of Kalamazoo College..
7:30 P.M. Tuesday: Discussion at the Center-
"What Do Lutherans Believe."
4:00 P.M. Wednesday: Tea and Coffee Hour at
the Center.
7:30 P.M. Wednesday: Lenten Services in Zion
and Trinity Churches.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student
Counsellor
Roger Williams Guild, 502 East Huron
10:00 A.M. Bible Study. Dr. Milton Froyd of
Colgate Rochester Divinity School will speak.
11:00 A.M.: Sermon by Dr. Froyd.
6:00 P.M.: Cost supper followed by a talk on
"Prayer" by Dr. Robert Smith of Dubuque
University.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Minister, Rev. Leonard-A. Parr, D.D.
Student Directors-H. L. Pickerill; Jean Garee
Music-Wayne Dunlap; J. Bertram Strickland
9:30- A.M.: Intermediate Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Nursery, Kindergarten and Primary
Departments.
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship. Dr. Parr will speak
on "Why Are You Afraid?" the third of the
Lenten sermons on "These Sayings of Mine."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild. Supper at Memorial
ChristiancChurch. Dr. Milton Froyd will speak
on "Psychological Requisites of Christian Liv-
ing."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue-Phone 2-0085
Rev. Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Adult Study Group-Prof. John Shep-
ard leading discussion of: "A Unitarian Phil-
osophy of Religion."
11:00 A.M.: Sermon by Rev. Edward H. Redman
on: "The Duties of a Religious Person."
7:00 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group. Discussion,
"Unitarian Utopias" led by Rev. Edward H.
Redman. Reports of Interviewers. Refresh-
ments.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
No. Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast, Canterbury House)d.
9:45 A.M.: Church School, Grades 7-9.
11:00 A.M.: Church School, through Grade 6.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer with Radio Address
by the Presiding Bishop and the Bishop of
Michigan.
12:15 P.M.: After-Service Fellowship.
5:30 P.M.: Canterbury Club Buffett Supper and
Program, Canterbury House. The Rev. John
Burtwill speak on "The Christian Faith and
War."
8:00 P.M.:rEvening prayer. Sermon by the Rev.
John Burt.
5:15 P.M. Daily (Mon.-Fri.) : Evening Prayer
and Meditation.
7:15 A.M. Wednesday: Holy Communion (fol-
lowed by Student Breakfast).
10:15 A.M. Thursday: Holy Communion; 12:10
P.M. StudentLenten Lunch; 12:30 P.M. Inter-
cessions; 6:30 P.M. Family Pot-Luck Supper
and 7:30 P.M. Study of the Bible, Page. Hall.
12:10 P.M. Friday: Holy Communion followed by
Lenten Lunch, Page Hall).

4

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p '.--..-.-- -________ ________________

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THE MAIN DINING ROOM
of Ith
UNIVERSITY OF MIICIIIGAN UNION
Serving Sunday Dinner
To Our Members and, I Iheir Guests.
12: 50 to J : 3 J'. M.

-V

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__. ,.__ ._. __,r_--_ ___ _

II

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{III

We carry a full line of
KOSHER DELICATESSEN

YOU ARE INVITE1) TO ATTI)ND
A FRIEE LFCTURE ENTITLED
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE:
THE SCIENCE OF GOD'S
ABUNDANT PROVISION
by H A ROLD MOL TER, C.S.B., of Chicago, Illinois
Member of the Board of Lectureship of The Mother Church,

S

ALAMI CORNED BEEF PASTRAMEI
WEINERS SMOKED FISH
Kosher Dills in bulk
FRESH DAILY
rn~ r RA;P (Z -- -c R-il 1 q

R

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue-Phone 5560
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)

CHURCH OF CHRIST
210 N. Fourth Ave.
Y.M.C.A. Auditorium
Carl York Smith, Minister
Telephone Numbers: 2-6007 and 2-7120
A.M.-"Dealing with God's Word."
P.M.-"Tomorrow.'
Guest Speaker, Vernon Magee.

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