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March 05, 1950 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-03-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

F- tTI-IMiTTAN DAITIV

-tTNI DAY, MARTM 5, 1950

[MPUS-WIDE CA RNIVA L:

Michigras To Bust out all over 'in April
* * *~ * * ** * *
By FRAN IVICK
:lcttgras is coming to campus :"" :
n, complete with ferris wheels,
e shows, cartoon parade floats
a kiddie glamour contest.
he traditional campus-wide
ival will this year boast the
e amusements that drew
i00 attendants in 1948 - plus
additional mechanical rides,
ider variety of booths and a
-organized parade, according
-eneral Co-Chairmen Jan Oli-
'50, and Bill Peterson, '50WY

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
'Cold Wars' in Peculiar
Shapes Strike ,Students
_____________ o

NEW FROM

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* * *
TO GIVE the parade a send-off
Ong its theme of "Cartoon
ipers," representatives of each
wrmitory group will meet with
rade chairman Valerie Lemper
4:30 p.m. tomorrow in Rm 3B
the Union.
Produced bi-annually by the
ombined efforts of men and
vomen from every campus
roup, Michigras first hit Ann
krbor in 1901, when students
ooled their talents to earn the
4,000 needed to purchase land
or the Michigan Union, toward
vhich proceeds were also given
n 1905 when the huge carnival
vas dubbed County Fair.
The show returned to campus
1924, when proceeds were dove-
iled into financing the Union
ool.
Not until 1937 was the event
ven the title Michigras, when it
as enlarged to its present mam-
oth proportions and held in Yost'
eld House, where it will again
presented April 21 and 22.
IN ITS PRESENT highly-de-
loped state, Michigras is a com-
nation carnival, circus and
untry fair, sponsored jointly by
AA and the Union.
Entertainment for the two
venings and an afternoon mati-
iee wil lie supplied this year by
0 mechanical rides, and more
han 50 booths sponsored and
manned by organizations to pro-
ide horror houses, girlie shows,
'efreshments and games of skill
o win Michibucks, with which
aried prizes can be purchased.
A general mass meeting of all
udents wishing to work on
lichigras will be held at 4 p.m.
ednesday in the Union Ballroom.
ating that participation in
lchigras production is open to
iy student on campus, Co-Chair-
an Peterson expects a turn-out
200 which will be organized in-
committees by the various
iairmen.
House groups, already hard at
ork on booth ideas and plans,
ay call Marg Kennedy, 3-4089,
Hal Sperlich, 2-3236, for further
rections until booth petitioning
closed March 10.

B y JANET WATTS
The collegiate version of the
cold war had various effects on
students throughout the nation
last week.
Despite the worst winter weath-
er in years, many students looked
on the coal strike as a blessing in
disguise as several college admin-
istrators contemplated closing in-
stitutions to conserve coal.
THOUGH MOST colleges mere-
ly ordered restrictions on building
room temperatures and lighting
facilities, at the University of Ill-
inois even dating seemed endan-
gered by the coal crisis.
A University ruling there re-
quired that all women be in
their houses by 10 p.m. every
night until the crisis ended. The
theory was that all electric
lights could be voluntarily turn-
ei off at that hour and thus
save much needed coal for other
purposes.
Later the administration rein-
terpreted the ruling so that women
could keep regular 10:30 p.m.
hours, even though all lights would
be extinguished at 10 p.m. except
those required for "safety and
the protection of property."
* * *

Northwestern and DePaul worked
out a peace settlement in their
own particular version of a "cold
war."
Cheer leaders from the two
schools got together to sign
mutual agreement whereby stu-
dents would applaud their op-
ponents at basketball games in-
stead of booing them.
At Princeton, too, students seem-
ed concerned about the antagon-
istic attitude expressed at ath-
letic events. There the basket-
ball team's starting five requested
that the student body "refrain
from booing opposing teams and
referees at the basketball games."
The cold war took on a more
serious aspect at the University of
California where students and fac-
ulty were up in arms about a
Board of Regents decision that
teachers either "sign the loyalty
oath or get out." The decision
which came after eight months of
heated discussion of the issues
requires faculty members to de-
clare that they are not affiliated
with the Communist Party.
With 13 and a half percent of
the faculty refusing to sign the
oath, Regents found they would
have a big job to calm some 150
enraged faculty who determined
to stand firm in opposition to the
decision.

No smears on the man in your life... OR ON YOU
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CHILLED
by the coal

THOUGH they were
shortage, students at

EAST LIBERTY AT FIFTH AVENUE

DOWN THE MIDWAY-in the 1948 Michigras, went 18,000
fun-seekers, taking in the various shows, rides, and skill games
which filled the Field House. Dominated by the ferris wheel, (at
left) the crowd squealed at the Sigma Chi house of horror (in
background) and tested their strength at the Phi Gam "Atom
Smasher" (at right)
Dorothy Thompson To Speak
During Religion in .Life Week

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pretty juniors, smart .isses'i every

.

Dorothy Thompson, noted news-
paper columnist, will be featured
in the panel of 11 speakers sche-
duled to take part in the annual
Religion in Life Week, opening
Sunday.
Others highlighting the week's
discussions are Prof. Vergilius

voted to the study of the function
of religion in modern society.
Prof. Form, Compton profes-
sor of philosophy, graduated
from Augustana Theological
Seminary, Iowa State University
and received his doctorate from
Yale.

0 @0

theyre all wearing HANDMACHER"S
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ONLY $ 25

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Form, chairman of the philosophy Pres. Everton, who will lead
groups in religion, sociology, and
department, W ooster College, international relations, spent a
Ohio; Pres. John Scott Everton, of year working with the American
Kalamazoo College; Prof. Arnold Friends Service Committee in In-
Nash, chairman of the department dia, and participated in work
of religion, North Carolina Uni- camps in Finland, and interna-
versity, and Milton C. Froyd, di- tional summer camps in this
recter of research at Colgate- country.
Rochester Divinity School, New Prof. Nash, who has received
hYork. graduate degrees in chemistry,
* * * philosophy and sociology, was edi-
RELIGION IN LIFE WEEK, for of "Education for Christian
sponsored by the Student Reli- I Marriage," and recently published
gious Association and the Cam- his book, "The University and
pus Religious Council, will be de- the Modern World."

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Also At The Downtown Store

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