100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 04, 1950 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1950-03-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'L

L-IN-THE-WA TER:

Model Steamer at Clements

By PETER HOTTON
Not content with collecting val-
uable books, pamphlets and paint-
ings of American lore, the William
L. Clements Library has added a
model steamboat to its fabulous
collection.
It's a model of the "Walk-in-
the-Water," famous in the annals
of Great Lakes history by being{
the first steamboat to ply Lakes
Erie, Huron and Michigan in 1818.
* * *
PURCHASED from a well-
known dealer in New York by the
Library, the model recalls the days
when steamboats on the Lakes and
anywhere else were received with
mixed feelings of skepticism and
praise, and owners wisely added.
sails to compensate for break-
downs and lack of power in their
new-fangled contraptions.
The boat was built at Black 4
Rock, New York, two-and-a- y
half miles down the Niagara
River from Buffalo, at a cost of
$50,000. She was 145 feet long,
32 feet wide and weighed 330
tons.
The engine, which gave the boat .
her distinctive feature, was built
after Fulton's steam engine and _#
developed 73 horsepower from its
single 40-inch pistons.
* * *

?k * * *

AT TIMES she carried as many
as 200 passengers on a regular
run from Black Rock to Detroit,
a distance of 300 miles, writes H.
A. Musham in a pamphlet "Early
Great Lakes Steamboats." She
burned 40 cords of wood on an
average runat seven and a half
miles an hour.
Her accommodations were not
luxurious, having been built es-
pecially for families moving to
Michigan and Ohio. Fares were
$18.00 cabin and 7.00 steerage
for the trip to Detroit. Cabin
fares were later reduced to $15.00
to meet competition from pure-
ly sailing vessels.
The "Walk-in-the-Water" had
been built before the advent of
steam-whistles, so she was rigged
with a four-pound cannon, which
was fired before leaving and a mile
before arriving at port. The can-
non later rolled off in a storm.
* * *
THE BOAT appears in a paint-
ing "Detroit in 1820" in the Lib-
rary by George Washington Whis-
tler, father of James Whistler.
The Detroit "Gazette" praised
the little ship when she first
docked there. . Said the "Ga-
zette:" "The Walk-in-the-Wat-
er . . . is supposed to be the
finest steamboat in America,
and in the world, excepting that
recently launched at New York,
nd destined to cross the At-
lantic."
Starting out on her first trip
with the best of luck from her
builders and especially her own-
ers, the "Walk-in-the-Water" met
with tough luck, not able to con-
tend with the five-mile current
on the Niagara River.
* * *

-Daily-Wally Barth
NEW CLEMENTS ADDITION--Mrs. Georgia C. Haugh, Assistant
Curator of Books at Clements Library, admires a model of "Walk-
in-the-Water," first steamboat to sail Lakes Erie, Huron and
Michigan. The Library added the model to its vast panorama in
books and documents of North American history.
* * * *
grin, she had to rely on "horn . but that the vessel is tied to a
breeze," 12 yoke of oxen, to pull great sturgeon, by whose mighty
her through the two-and-a-half power it moves right along
miles of rapids. against wind and tide."
The steamboat was named af-
ter a Wyandotte Indian Chief Adding to her list of "firsts,"
who lived in a village at what "Walk-in-the-Water" in 1819 trip-
is now Wyandotte, Michigan. He ped up to Mackinac Island, and
fought for the British in the in 1821 carried a detachment of
War of 1812 and died only two troops into the "upper country"
months before his namesake and continued through the Straits
steamed past his village on the of Mackinac, into Lake Michigan
Detroit River. and to Green Bay.
The "Walk-in-the-Water" ex- * * *
cited enthusiasm and awe where- EACH WINTER she was over-
ever she went, at first. At Cleve- hauled and repaired, but the
land, all 500 citizens flocked down weakness in her hull by breaking
to the shore to admire her. such a small deck into three parts
* * * took its toll.
BUT AS TIME went on, she be- In 1821, a gale on Little Lake
came endeared to the people who Erie coaxed the "Walk-in-the-
knew her, and they dropped the Water" to walk on the land at
cumbersome name and referred to what is now the foot of Main
her simply as "The Steamboat." Street in Buffalo, which result-
One of her passengers in the ed in her breaking her keel in
first docking at Detroit was the three places and shattering her
Rev. John Mentieth, president of hull.
the fledgling "University of Mich-
igania," founded at Detroit the Only part of her saved was her
year before. engine, which saw service later in
Mentieth wrote: "The French the "Superior." .
. .. came to the conclusion that Though "Walk -in -the -Water"
'It is a Yankee contrivance and lasted only three years, she and
has its smoke from the lower her successors plied the Lakes for
regions.' The copper-colored man 20 years before the Atlantic was

Restaurant
Association
Organized
Opinions Voiced
On 'U'_Activity
Following a hasty meeting of
last week, 35 local restaurant own-
ers met again Thursday evening to
organize formally and voice their
opinions on "University competi-
tion."
A smaller group met a week ago
and composed a letter sumnoning
the restaurant owners to the dis-
cussion, citing a snackbar recently
established in the East Quadrangle
as an example of this competition.
* * * -
THE GROUP became the Ann
Arbor Restaurant Association dur-
ing the four hour meeting, and
elected Robert Nichols, city alder-
man and owner of a South bivi-
sion restaurant, as president.
Robert P. Briggs, Vice-presi-
dent of the University, told these
officers in a conference that
"the University has been operat-
ing residence hall dining rooms
since 1929," and that he "sees
no reason why the competition
should suddenly have a decided-
ly greater effect on the business
of restaurants."
He compared the snack bar to
the Michigan Union taproom,
which has operated since 1917
without a competition cry going
up.
* * *
LASTu WEEK owners in the
East Quadrangle area estimated
their evening business as having
dropped from 10 to 50%. The
snack bar has been in operation
two weeks, and is open nightly
from 8:30-11:00 p.m.
Nichols revealed that mem-
bership in the association was
not limited to restaurants in the
campus area, but also included
numerous downtown restaur -
ants.
Present at the meeting was Ray
P Fling, secretary of the Michigan
Restaurant Association, who of-
fered the support of this organiza-
* tion.
The local association officers
were instructed to continue their
efforts to cope with the situation
which the group terms "a major
problem."
Prof. Thomas
Cites Cause
Of Budget Ills
"Because of political pressures,
our representatives do nothing
about real budget-balancing while
they continue to voice economy
slogans," according to Prof. Mor-
gan Thomas, of the political sci-
ence department.
Prof. Thomas' accusation ap-
peared in the March issue of "Mi-
chigan Business Review,", publish-
ed by the Bureau of Business Re-
search of the School of Business
Administration.
VETERAN'S INSURANCE, rail-
way retirement, and old age and
survivor's insurance should pay
their administrative costs and not
get general taxpayers money, he
proposed.
Prof. Thomas also recom-
mended that oil and mining in-
terests, insurance companies and
investment trusts should be
brought under the income tax

laws. He added, however, that
F;uch revisions hit squarely into
"the hornets' nest of i pressure
,group."
Prof. Thomas noted the Hoover
Commission's assertion that, in
} the matter of a balanced budget,
the President's hands are tied to
a very great extent.
He suggested that "political
courage on the part of congress-
men and the President, coupled
with a knowledge of the facts on
the part of the nationally-minded
electorate, would do much to in-
sure a balanced budget in 1951."
Blood Donors
Safe -- Forsythe
In commending the World Stu-
dent Service Fund drive for blood
donation, Dr. Warren E. Forsythe,
director of Health Service, an-
nounced that such donations "as
usually spaced, carry little, if any,
hazard to the health of the don-
or."
The actual process of giving
blood only takes a half hour, he
explained, although he said ,t was
advisable not to eat for four hours
preceding the donation.
Students may donate blood
from 8 to 11:30 a.m. and from 1:30
to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day at the University .f spital
Blood Bank.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University. Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office of the
Assistant to the President, Room 2552
Administration Building, by 3:00 p.m.
en the day preceding publication
k11:00 a.m. Saturdays).
SATURDAY, MARCH 4, 1950
VOL. LX, No. 102
Notices
Glasses Found: Several dozen
pairs of used glasses have been
delivered to the Health Service.
Students who wish to inspect them
for possible recovery, see Miss Par-
sons, Tel. 2331.
Eugene G. Fassett Scholarships
are available to undergraduate
men or women students who have
been residents at the University for
one or more semesters. Application
blanks may be obtained at the
Scholarship Division,eOffice of
Student Affairs, 1059 Administra-
tion Bldg. Completed applications
must be returned by March 31.
Camp Positions:
Representative of Camp Q-Gull,
Lake Charlevoix, Mich. (coed, pri-
vate), will be at the Bureau of
Appointments Wed., Mar. 8, to
interview candidates for the fol-
lowing positions: camp nurse, wa-
terfront, experienced g e n e r a 1
counselors.
Representative of Camp Kitan-
niwa, Hastings, Mich. (Battle
Creek Camp Fire Girls), will be at
the Bureau of Appointments on
Tues., Mar. 7, to interview appli-
cants for the following positions:
camp nurse, waterfront, experi-
enced general counselors.
For information and appoint-
ment concerning the above an-
nouncements, call at 3528 Admin-
istration Bldg., or call ext. 2614.
Academic Notices
Botany I Make-up Examination:
Tues., Mar. 7, 4 p.m., 1139 Natural
Science for students with excused
absences from the Fall Term final
examination.
Makeup Examination in Eco-
nomics 51, 52, 53, 54: Thurs., Mar.
9, 3 p.m., 202 Economics Bldg. Any
student expecting to take this ex-
amination must leave his name
with the Departmental Secretary
before the examination,
Philosophy 33 (Logic) Make-up
Examination: 7 p.m., Thurs., Mar.
9, 202 Mason Hall.
Mathematics Orientation Semi-
nar: 3 p.m., Mon., Mar. 6, 3001 An-
bell Hall. Mr. Norman will speak
on "A Solution by Besikovitch of a
Minimum Problem in Geometry."
(Continued on Page 4)
EVES. & SUN.
ADULTS 35c - KIDDIES 12c
LAST DAY
Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire
"HOLIDAY INN"
---Also --
"STAGECOACH KID"
with Tim Holt

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .50 1.02 1.68
3 .60 1.53 2.52
4 .80 2.04 4.80
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.
PERSONAL
JOHN-Thanks for the inside info on
the 39c luncheon at J. D. Miller's
Cafeteria. Boy that entree, potato,
vegetable, bread, butter and bever-
age really taste good. What a buy.
Hank. )2P
Roses are red,
Violets are blue,
Want Something?
-Then its Class ifieds for You.
Lost & found or for rent,
Rooms, or brooms or humor bent,
Business buys and personal stuff,
Classifieds are quite enough. ),7P
DEAR BOY FRIEND-All the girls on
my floor went to Assembly-all but
ne-why didn't you invite me? Be-
wildered Freshman. ) 7P
SENIORS-The Michiganensian must
put in its order for the number of
1950 Ensians it will want. If YOU
want your Ensian this May-come to
the Student Publications Bldg. and
order yours today. )8P
NEWS FROM CLUB 211-Club 211's new
policy-there is no expiration date on
meal tickets! Tickets good any day-
need not be used on consecutive days.
Expiresonly when completely punch-
ed. ) 2P

PIANO TEACHER just returned from
N.Y., resuming piano classes. Begin-
ners and advance students. Ph. 2-0779.
RECEIVING DAY for spring coats, suits,
and children's garments, Tues. and
Wed. each wk. 'Nearly New Shop, 311
E. Huron, Ph. 3-0166. )8B
HAVE YOUR typewriter repaired by the
Office Equipment Service Company,
215 E. Liberty. )4
WASHING and, or, ironing done in my
own home. Free pick up and deliv-
ery. Phone 2-9020. )1B
HILDEGARDE SHOPPE
109E. Washington
Expert Alterations
Custom Clothes
by Established Tradition )3B
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR _
Ukeleles - $5.50
New and Used Instruments
209 E. Washington )4B
LEAVE JUNIOR with a reliable baby
sitter while you go out - anytime.
Kiddie Kare, 3-1121. )10B
TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales and Service
MORRILL'S-314 S. State St. )11B
PROMPT SERVICE on all typewriter
repairs. MOSELEY TYPEWRITER &
SUPPLY CO., 214 E. Washington. )5B
SYLVIA STUDIO OF DANCE-Ballroom,
tap, acrobatic, ballet. Over Michigan
Theater. Phone 8066. )9B
FOR, SALE
COUSIN'S ON STATE ST.
During the coal shortage try one of
our cardigan or slipover sweaters.
_Prices $4.95 - $6.95.)3
1949 ENGLISH FORD-Al condition,
heater, undercoated. New in August.
Will stll' $500 below price. Ph. 2-8770.
6151 W. Huron. Any evening, all day
_Sat, and Sun. )40
BEST BU -Plastic Raincoats $2.99;
Fancy" knit "T" Shirts $1.49; Black
Moccasins $2.99; Part wool.Athletic
Hose 39c. Open 'til 6 p.m. Sam's
Store] 122 E. Washington. )5
FLORESCENT DESK LAMP - $4.00.
1336 Geddes Ave. Ph. 6829. Ryan. )41

a
0.
N

BUSINESS
SERVICES

a ;
r £WE

FOR SALE
PHONOGRAPH RECORDS (classical)
150 78 r.p.m. albums for sale at
list or less. Ali makes, excellent con-
dition. 118 N. Thayer, Apt. 2, Phone
2-9185. )38
TAME YOUNG Parakeets, Canaries and
Love Birds. Bird supplies and cages.
Mrs. Ruff ins, 562 S. '7th. )2B
MAKE TIME OR LIFE part of your
college life. Special reduced Student
Rates available ($4.75 a year-instead
of $6) to make it easier. Phone Stu-
dent Periodical Agency, 2-82-42. We'll
bill you. )
MONEY SAVERS-Navy T-shirts, 45c.
Khaki pants, $2.99. All wool athletic
hose, 49c. Marlboro gabardine sport
shirts, $3.99. Navy type oxfords, $6.88.
Open 'til 6 p.m. SAMS STORE 122 E.
Washington St.)5
cLosE4'
ROOMS
FOR RENT
2 SINGLE ROOMS. Men preferably.
)46B
TO SHARE-Large double room with
law studentOne block from law club.
8080 Oakland. )47R
SINGLE ROOM for male students, 3%
blocks from campus. Hollywood beds,
shower, sink in room. $6.00 per wk.
Ph. 5750. )19R
STUDENT LANDLORD - Double room,
three blocks from campus. 412 South
Fifth Avenue. 2-8365. )44R
MEN'S ONE-HALF-Large double, $6.50.
Near Rackham, 120 N. Ingalls, Ph.
2-6644, )45R
AT 1019 CHURCH-Half of large double
room for male student. Enquire at
rear apt., evenings. )8B
VACANCY for male students. Rooms
can be used as apartment. Also double
rooms. Call 2-2052. 8R
ATTRACTIVE single room. Cooking
privileges. 507 E. Liberty and 1106
Lincoln. Ph. 5224. )14R
Read and Use
Dail y Classifieds

LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
209 . State
Phone 8161

)1P

I

MEN WANTED to eat at fraternity
house. Excellent food, moderate pric-
es. Close to campus. Call Bud Ph.
73039. )lop

.o

W 1

LOST & FOUND

MEN'S GLEE CLUB
Presents
(CONCERT and VARIETY SHOW toperson
THE MOST TALKED ABOUT BAND IN AMERICA

-#

LOST-Small black purse. Vicinity Ar-
chitecture Bldg. and S. Univ. Cards
andtkeys valuable to owner. Reward.
3-1561. )24L
Continuous from 1 P.M.

i

-- LAST'

TIMES TODAY

MUCH TO HER captain's cha- ( was not
All Night Pile COLLE
Driving Brmgs Gei
On Legal Suit Bo(
Protesting all night pile driving B
at the Veterans Administration Anyone
Hospital site, Mrs. Margaret Cop- leon - a
ley, filed a bill of complaint against -can stud
two Ann Arbor contracting firms signature
early -yesterday. eral Libra
Western Foundation Corp. and A comp
the J. D. Hedin Construction Co. letters an
were ordered to appear in circuit leon andl
court Monday morning to defend the signal
themselves against a possible in- generalsR
junction. Until the hearing, pile are ingen
driving work is to be eliminated large cabi'
from 8 p.m. to 7 a.m. the Cardt
* * *
IN ADDITION to the injune- THE CA
tion, Mrs. Copley is asking dam- the gifto
ages of $2,000 because of the "in- of Detroit
terference with her enjoyment of lection tot
her residence by the unlawful acts mony stag
of the defendants." Jan. 15, 19
Mrs. Copley alleged that "cer- notables,i
tain difficulties have arisen in Regents a
the erection of the hospital by dent Clare
reason of which it has become the gift.
necessary to drive long steel The c
piles a great distance in the
ground." Audi
Because of the problems en-
countered "the defendants are nowC1
engaged in the driving of piles erV
with immense steam hammers, two
in number from 8 in the morning Film
until midnight."
According to Mrs. Copley the
work "produces a tremendous Lunchti.
noise" which shakes the Copley the latest
residence, "makes sleep impossible" ploymenti
and has reduced the plaintiff "to ministrati
a state of nervous exhaustion The Au
which will cause permanent phy- ducts a se
sical and mental harm." that affor
fitable wa
'U' BUys A crg hour byc
films they

inclined to think so, crossed.
JCTOR'S ITEM:
ieral Library Showcase
asts Napoleon'sSignature

y NAN BYLAN
who thinks he's Napo-
nd normal students, too
dy the French Emperor's
first hand at the Gen-
ry.
lete set of autographed
d documents of Napo-
his marshals, as well as
ures of several of his
and cabinet members,
tiously arranged in a
net at the north end of
Catalog Room.
* * *
ASE and documents are
of Orla B. Taylor, '86,
He presented the col-
the University in a cere-
ged at the Library on
929, before several state
including the Board of
nd Henry Ford. Presi-
nce Cook Little accepted
ollection is the result
io-Vis ial
le "
ke Offers
s at Noon
me movies are among
reasons for seeking em-
in the University's Ad-
on Building.
dio-Visual Service con-
mi-weekly film program
ds staff members a pro-
ay to spend their noon
enabling them to view
y ordinarily would not
ol-or it 'trf n .

of almost 30 years of work, be-
ginning with the accidental
purchase by Taylor of an 1810
autograph of Napoleon.
Shortly after, a friend in Chi-
cago gave him an autograph of
Marshal Suchet. From this start
the desire arose to complete the
collection.
TAYLOR ORIGINALLY inten i-
ed to limit the autographs to those
of Napoleon and his marshal;.
But after a time he extended the
collection to include the generals
and cabinet members.
His search for the autographs
involved the services of collec-
tors in London and Paris as well
as stiff bidding in New York
auctions.
Because he didn't want his col-
lection to be buried away in "cold
storage" back in the stacks, Tay-
lor had a special case designed,
enabling students to examine the
autographs and at the same time
preserving the signatures.
THE CASE contains some sixty
shallow, glass-covered drawers in
which the autographs are placed.
Most of the slides are horizontal,,
but those letters which have wrt-
ing on both sides have been placed
in vertical slides.
The drawers work on roller
bearings and are arranged so
that all the autographs of one
person can be inspected at the
saire time.
In addition to the autographed
letter, each drawer contains a
transcription in French, a I'ra:is-
lation in English, biographical

4 \ ty~j NIERSAt"NERMtTIAA
- i Starts Sunday
1HE NEW
JOLSON :
M Luidwig Dill Myron Tamara
rDomarest *Donath Goodwin *McCoamick *Shayne
HENR LEVIN * SIDNEY DUCAN
O BIA PICTURE

r
{

I

R

SUN. - TUES.

I

k

Shown at 2:35 - 5:25 - 8:20
S PLUS *e
What a party you'll have at
"RUSTY'S BIRTHDAY"
with Ted Donaldson

A.

I

No. Main - Opp. Court House
- ENDS TONIGHT -
"MARY RYAN,
DE TECTIVE"
- ---Plus -
MARSHALL"

STARTS SUNDAY
thru Wed.
Matinees 30c 'til 5 -- Nights 40c
TWO FIRST RUN HITS
ROY ROGERS
"Bells of Coronado"
- Plus -
JOYCE REYNOLDS
"Girl's School

Ice Show.
.e .fl . * .
HILL
AU DITORI UM
Tuesday, March 7
2 Performances
I7 and 9:30 P.M.

g Council
Seats
-. ... .. $1.80

A

E

mCINEM

TODAY and Sunday

has no master when
9' it comes to filming this sort of
thing. He shows us filth, thievery,
squalor, vice and even perversion

Sponsored by .Engincerin
Main Flogr and Choice
in 1st Balcony.... .

A

I

..,__

I

I

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan