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February 17, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

StK

THE-- MTCTTTTAN 6DUTY

TnTTt Sb AT, T'FT3Ttr,,kTtT 17, m oo

si ~~A-FERT-iT17 14

WIDE AW AKE CLASS:
Foundrymen in Pontiac
End 16 Week Program

I SPIRE

TUAL EMPHASIS:

Form Plans for Religion in Life Week

Ry PETER NOTTON
Students who think that their
worries about studying are over
when they leave college are in for
a. big letdown.
Worries weren't over for the 33
members of a Pontiac Foundry
who took a coure in engineering,
control last fall from Prof. F. B.
Rote of the Engineering School.
They just finished the 16-week
course and will receive their cer-
tificates of achievement Saturday
from Prof. W. 0. Boston.
Radio Division
To Broadcast
Toda Locally

Script To Dramatize
Geiger Counter Uses
The radio division of the speech
department will pres nt its second
special half-hour broadcast of this
semester at 10 p.m. today over sta-
tion WHRV.
The program will be an original
drama document, Atomic Age De-
tective, written by Ray Nadeau,
Grad. Nadeau's work is an exami-
nation of the innumerable uses
found for one of science's most
valuable tools, the Geiger Counter.
Authentic information for the
script was obtained through Ar-
thur Williams of the physics de-
partment.
Merrill McClatchey will direct
the program and the cast includes
John Rich, Donna DeHarde, DOn
Hall, Al Samborn, Stan Challis,
Nafe Katter, Jack Jensen, John
Reynolds, Bill Swisher, Tom
Cramer, Bill MacKenzie, Richard
Rifenberg, Maynard Newton, Mac
Barnum and Albert Fetting.
Wildrnan Elected
Tria gles Officers
Allen Wildman was elected vice-
president of the Student Religious
Association Council at a meeting
held recently.
The SRA Electorate, a group of
the more active members of the
Association which acts as a leg-
islative body, set Feb. 24 as the
date for its next meeting,
-_ - __ .._-. . .. .

"STUDENTS IN the course
ranged from the president of the
foundry, fourth largest in the
United States, to clerical and lab-
oratory personnel.
In five sections, the non-
credit course was designed to
get the best designs, materials
and equipment for casting parts
for a well-known bicycle motor
and other products of the foun-
dry.
It was initiated by the com-
pany as a service to Michigan In-
dustry, according to Rote, to help
firms in training personnel and
to put industry on a more con-
crete scientific foundation.
* * *
ROTE COMMUTED 50 miles to
Pontiac every Wednesday night
and Saturday morning all during
the football season.
"I enjoyed teaching the
course," he said, "but I missed
every last one of the football
games. Never again."
Rote said that lie was pleasantly
surprised by the seriousness of his
students. There were no sleepers
or even foot-shufflers in his
classes.
"THEIR AVERAGE was high
too," Rote commented. "In their
final exam which was as difficult
as the jun~ior and senior engi-
neering tests of theeUniversity,
their average was 10 per cent
higher than that of the students
here."
Rote emphasized that this was
a good challenge to the future
engineers and professional stu-
dents who will meet some serious
competition when they graduate.
Ad. Casualty
The BAd school has discovered
a new means of exterminating
rats!
All it takes is a beautiful mod-
ern building, a recently installed
elevator and a rat who doesn't
mind his own business.
Yes, the mystery of the over-
powering odor pervading the BAd
school on Tuesday has been
solved.
An intellectually curious rat,
possibly an accounting major,
was discovered decaying on top
of the ventilator of the elevator.
Suggestions as to the cause of
BAd school's first casualty range
from murder to electrocution.

Rleigious emphasis will reach
into every corner of campu:: life I
when the University recognizes
Religion in Life Week, March
6-10.#
Outstanding men from every
field will enter the class room and
organized houses to speak on re-
ligion in their field of interest.
SIMILAR programs at other
universities suggested the idea of
a religious emphasis week here.
Praf. Louis Hopkins, of the
mathematics department, will
head an all campus student-
faculty committee. Bill Miller
and Irma Eichorn are student
vice- chairmen.
Religion in Life Week will get
underway Sunday, March 6, with-

the' 10main speakers preaching:in
various churches at morning sV-r
ices. Church guilds have also
scheduled some of the speakers
for their evening meetings.
* * ,
ORGANIZED houses committee
chairmen Bruce Lockwood and
Val Johnson have arranged for
these men to appear at fraternity,
sorority and dormitory discussion
sessions.
Speakers are George Peel
Gilmour, chancellor of McMas-
ter University in lalmilton,
Onti;rio; T. Z. Koa, Chinese
delegate to the United Nations
organizational meeting in San
Francisco; Vera Smith Lowrie,
lecturer in family relations;
and Victor Obenhaus, profes-

Mod ern Calculating Machines
~.iLLU~gLI 7 li * L7J~/ k * lt)

1
i

For the practical education of ac- chines, totally valued at $50,000,
counting students. 24 of the most ranges from the simplest adding
modern calculating machines are machine to the latest high speed
being demonstrated by three oper.- automatic accounting machine.
ators from the Burroughs Adding
Machine Company in Rm. 58 of ACCORDING to Mr. D. A.
the BAd. school this week. Lynch, who lectures to interested
The complexity of these ma- students on the features of the
exhibit, the machine causing the
most "ohs and als" is the cycle
billing machine, used almost uni-
eersallytby department stores as
the most efficient means of mak-
W illF'eature ing out customers' statements.
AIeatAcin

sor ofsocial ethics at Chicago
Theolagical Seminary.
Others are Raymond John Seeg-
er, professor of physics at George
Washington University; Joseph
Sittler, an ordained minister;
James Lloyd Stoner, national di-
rector of the University Christian
Mission; and Kiyoshi Tanimoto.
Japanese Methodist minister, who
is the hero of John Hershey's
book, "Hiroshima."
' * *
ALSO LISTED on the program
are Dr. Eldred Thiehoff, director
of the student Health Service at
the University of Kansas; Herrick
Young, secretary of the Presby-
terian board of Foreign Missions;
Father James Keller, founder and
director of the Christophers; and
Rabbi Leon Fram, of the Temple
Israel in Detroit.

.L

Daily-Bill Ohlinger.
OFTICE VISIT--Mrs. Martha Strauss, Betsy Barbour's popular housemother chats informauy with
Edith Smith and Gerry Bollag in her attractively redecorated "office."
* * , * * * . 4 * *
WANTS ANOTHER NAME:
ousemother Says Title Scares Coeds

By ALICE BRINKMAN
"There ought to be another
name for housemothers."
"It scares girls away," Mrs.
Marjorie A. Strauss, house direc-
tor at Betsy Barbour, believes. I
"I would like to know all my
girls," she said, "especially shy
ones and those whom I could help,
but the title 'housemother' often
puts a barrier between us."
(The Daily chose Mrs. Strauss at
random, from among the many
campus housemothers, who face
similiar problems, to present the
housemother's viewpoint of her
job.)
Mrs. Strauss, who has 118 coeds

in her "family," almost half "I don't want to break-up true
freshmen, is a freshman herself love or call love-making bad." At-
at "housemothering." Her expei'i- traction between boy and girl is
ence, she said, consisted in raising "a healthy sign," she said. "but
two daughters. Both graduated couples sometimes just go beyond
from Smith College, she added,. good taste."
and are now raising their own To meet the problem, she sug-
families. gested the girls hold closed house-
"I like to approach my job as ( meetings, by classes. In closed ses-
mother. for this reason," she said. sions, she explained, they would

EaLlla Fitz gei'ald
Norman Granz's Jazz at the
Philharmonic, starring singer
Ella Fitzgerald and a host of na-
tionally famous jazz players will
again come to Hill Auditorium
8:30 p.m., Feb, 25, sponsored by
the Student Legislature.
Besides Miss Fitzgerald, saxo-
phonist Coleman Hawkins, win-
ner of several Esquire Gold
Awards, and drummer Shelly
Manne, late of Stan Kenton's or-
chestra, will perform.

Another machine attracting a
great deal of attention was one
that writes and calculates in-
voices with lightning-like speed.
It multiplies electrically.
Lynch maintains that any of
these machines is relatively simple
to manipulate.
4 4 *
HE GUARANTEES that within
half an hour a student with no
previous bookkeeping or account-
ing experience can learn to work
the most complicated of the ma-
chines.
This exhibit of the Burrough
Adding Machine Company is part
of its permanent educational pro-
gram,
TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes
Bought,
Repaired
Rented,
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
G. I. Requisitions Acceptet
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St.

Of course there are girls from all
kinds of homes, she continued,
and they need different treatmoEit
than two girls in the same family
but that makes the job "thrilling"
and "challenging" to Mrs. Strauss.1
Necking has been one of the!
problems so far, she commented.
- ~ ~ ~ ~ - ~ ~ ~ - ~ ~ ~ ~

GOING HOME.:

MOM"

STAEB

& DAY's

Chinese Students Will Attempt
To Cross Nationalist Lines

ill ter-fnventory
C L -E AI Ra AN VC IE?
Or'atic Iecdtoiis for
InflmedbfftC Disposal
No. 1--Manhattan and Van Heusen Shirts
$3.95 values. NOW $3.16 -2 for $6.00.
No. 2-Leather Front Jackets with wool back
and sleeves. $25.00 values. NOW $12.95.
No. 3-Wool Jackets. $18.00 and
$22.50 values. NOW $6.95.
No. 4-1 Lot Sport Shirts.
Values to $7.85. NOW $3.95.
No. 5-All Wool Shirts, small size only.
$9.85 values. NOW 2 for $5.50.
The Downtown Store for Michigan Men
30"m ho Sew ae
30 "UT MAI SE

Three Chinese students left the
University yesterday on the firstI
leg of a 10,000 mile trek which
will take them behind the Com-
munist lines in China.
The trio, who asked that their
names be withheld, have been do-
ing graduate work here for the
past year. They became mem-
bers of the Communist Party dur-
War d To Talk
Ont U.S.-SoV ietI
AffairsToda
Harry F. Ward, New York the-
ologist, will speak on the cold war
and Soviet-American relations at
7:30 p.m. today at the Young Pro-
gressives open meetiig at the Mu -
sonic Temple.-
He will also speak to lacol yI
members at a luncheon given for
him at noon in the Union,
h< '

jug their undergraduate days at a
unversity in Peking.
WILE studying in China they
took part in student protests
against activities of the National-
ist Government. They also workedI
with the Communists in spreadingI
literature and erecting posters. I
As reports out of China indi-
cated the imminent fall of the
Nationalist Government and
assumption of power by the
Communists the students deter-
mimed to leave Ann Arbor and
return to their native land.
Tn their early twenties, thi
three students are still unsure
what part they will play in the
new government. They will sail
from the West Coast and expect
to reach China in a month.
ONC'E ThER- ,tiy will at."
lmpt to liNcrce the nationalist
lim!ws and n'ter Communist o((-,
pied China where they will rejoiu
teI )'families.
Strom;; critics of the Chiang
KaiSlick government while
studying in Kieking, the trio
claimed the Nationalists ruth-
lessly supressed student opposi-
tioni.
Tiu'y charge the nationalists
kidnapped student leaders and
held them until pressure from a
student strike forced their re-
lease.

be free to talk among themselves. They will play in
Social pressure exerted by the Flip Phillips, anot]
girls themselves, she continued. is ist, and hornists'
the discipline under this ap- I Sonny Criss and "
proach. and others. The pr
"Nobady likes to be preached to be half jazz, ha)
to," she observed. "I believe in Price of seats ra
giving the girls a chance to tell from $1.80, althoug
their side. engagement pricesr
"I do not feel that I have any as much. Ticket ap
so-called problem girls. From be sent to Jazz at
years of general observation such monic, 1020 Admini
girls always have a reason behind ---
their behavior," she finds. "Most e
often it is a broken or unhappy Artists s
' homne.
In helping these girls develop
poise and c(harn the attractiveLe
housemother believes that a pleas-
ant homey atmosphcre is impor- "Lotor," the gor
tart as well as understanding, I has hit the trail a
hcr office was too 'old and unin- owners hope it's n
teresting she said, so she redec- land trail,
or~ated ita a
ore i The capricious '
Commenting on her job, th retrieved only last
new director said she likes to live previous surrender
with young people. "Their ideas evs surreder
are stimulating. and laughingly has been modeling
S s agGeorge. Mrs. Geor
she added, "living with them a trIbu
makes it impossible for me to set- a story about a r
tle down in a comfortable rut. by her husband, ha
Although she modestly asserts to keep "Lotor at
that her chief talent is dishwash- Last night, whe
ing, she admits she is interested in were leaving for a
evei'ythiing from art to football to jealous at losing th
the financial page with many mentarily, became
stops in between Mrs. George brok
The g'ils laugh at me when I cage, and made off
watch the financial page s closely Mrs. George 1n
but I think its like a pulse of world anyone finding t
economic conditions." 2-7894 "at any tin

copany with
her saxophon-
Tommy Turk,
Fats" Navarro,
ogram is slated
lf swing.
nge downward
h metropolitan
ran up to twice
plications may
t the Philhar-
stration Bldg.
Coot
gaum
geous raccoon,
again-and her
ot the timber-
coon, who was
week after a

We will be pleased to test your
watch in just 30 seconds and
show you a printed record,
telling its true condition - all
in 30 seconds.
We make this offer to acquaint
you with our advanced, scien-
tific watch repair service in
which all of our work is checked
electronically on our
EXPERT WATCH REPAIRS
PROMPT
ECONOMICAL SERVICE
Dick "Doc" Gainey
NOW AT
L.G. Baif Hour Co.
1319 5, University
Phone 9533

i
I

9

A artial List of Operas
Available on

to wanderlust,
for Mrs. John
ge, illustrating
accoon written
s been hard put
home.
n the Georges
movie, "Lotor,"
e spotlight mo-
"furious," said
ke out of her
f.
is asked that
he 'coon call
lie.

RCA

VICTOR

°3-

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A THIRD meeting will be an in-
formal get-together with Ward at
4 p.m. in Lane Hall. The SRA,
sponsors of the informal meeting,
invites all interested students. Re-
freshmients will be served.
Ward has traveled widely and
has visited the Soviet Union
twice since 1917.

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