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May 22, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

___________________ THE MICHIGAN DAILY___________

...

Final Concert
On Tuesday
The University of Michigan
Concert Band, under the direction
of Dr. William D. Revelli, will
make its final appearance of the
season Tuesday evening at Hill
Auditorium.
The band will perform a variety
of selections, including works by
Wagner, Saint-Saens, and Gould.
OF MAJOR IMPORTANCE in
the program will be "Michigan
Rhapsodie," a work based on
twelve traditional songs of the
University of Michigan and ar-
ranged by Floyd Werle, a sopho-
more in the School of Music.
"Michigan Rhapsodie" was
written In January, 1949 for the
Concert Band, by the request of
Dr. Revelli.
The arranger, Floyd Werle, is
majoring in theory and was piano
soloist last year with the Con-
cert Band in the premiere of
"Concerto in Jazz," by Phillips.
"Michigan Rhapsodie," Werle's
first large work, was acclaimed
enthusiastically in Battle Creek
and Dearborn, Michigan.
Ishpeming Club
Elects Officers
Howard Bennetts, '50, has been
elected president of the newly or-
ganized Ishpeming Club.
Others chosen to lead the group
are vice-president, Howard Bu-
torac, '51; secretary, Barbara
Fandrem, '52; treasurer, Roy
Goethe, '52 and historian, Grace
Hampton, '508M.
x

MSC'Rash'
Students enjoying themselves
along the banks of Michigan
State's Cedar River have run
into a "rash" problem.
The problem is poison ivy-
Dr. Charles Holland, director of
MSC's health service reported
that spring has brought a sharp
increase in the number of pois-
onings from the tnri-leafed vine.
But Dr. Warren E. Forsythe,
director of the University
Health Service, reports that
there have beenonly a smat-
tering of cases here.
'U' Scientists
Get Sigma Xi
Memberships
Seven faculty members, two
alumni and 210 students have
been initiated into the University
chapter of Sigma Xi, national
honor society for research sci-
entists.
Full membership in the society
was granted the faculty members,
the alumni and 59 graduate stu-
dents. Remaining students receiv-
ed associate memberships.
New faculty members include
Prof. Robert W. Buxton of the
surgery department; Prof.*Mary
C. Crowley of the dentistry school
and Dr. Robert H. Grekin, veteran
resident in dermatology and syph-
ilogy.
Others are Prof. Herbert R.
Morgan of the public health
school; Prof. Floyd D. Ostrander
of the dentistry school; Prof. Ed-
ward T. Vincent of the mechani-
cal engineering department and
Prof. George Winston Sinclair of
the geology department.

TWO CAMPUS WHEELS:

Maslin, Domangue Share
By ROMA LIPSKY.,__+ _...n_ sphere
"We share everyt g-offices, linsay
clothes, beer and women." I was
Al Maslin and Norris Domangue Ias.no
probably two of the biggest wheels arScho
this campus has ever seen, declare .*ests r
that their careers have run re- rng t
markably parallel. a.work,
* * * work,
* * *approa
IT ALL BEGAN in the fall ofh-
'46, when Maslin, then president.....chologi
of Wenley House, was president :. Foil
of the West Quad and Domangue ; . June,
moved from the top position in .on aj
Lloyd House to become the Quad's being
vice-president. .: tem t
But the positions were soon j
shifted around. The Association Mas
of Independent Men was formed -.fall to
with Domangue as its first pres- >oompl
ident and Maslin as vice-presi- league
A t '{ "He
dent.. -."H.:
About this same time, both were ..~z kmy las
elected to the Student Legislature, E
amassing the largest number of EVE
first-place votes yet seen in SL t estabii
They served as members-at- dling
large in the SL cabinet, but at dif- mngu
ferent times; "spread it thin" they e. "
say. "e
They attribute their success to bpre
"our ability to be gentlemen at all
times. Smiles open many doors and tinuej
other things." -that t
* * * back a
They claim to have the "same -Daily-Don Howe
personalities, outlooks on life, mis- NORRIS DOMANGUE AL MASLIN
trusts, and loves," but a mock * * * *
feud over seniority occasionally Michigamua, because of the work DP, and senior class committees,
causes dissension in the ranks. the tribe does and the people in and have scratched out more con- E
Maslin has one year on Domangue, it," they declared. stitutions than any other two men
although both admit to being Although they have been clos- on the campus. 1
"twice as old as most of the other est friends for three years, and "We have constitutions we 190
impressionables around here." have great respect for each other, haven't even used yet!"
* * * the pair have never roomed to- During the war, Domangue was
"THE BEST THING that has gether. an Air Corps lieutenant, and Mas- tors n
happened to either of us on this "That would be the end of lin a Navy petty officer. s. e
campus was being initiated into both of us," they think. * * *+'

Fame
wasn't very effective," Mas-
's. "Norris was in Europe and
in Asia, and both places'
ow in a helluva mess."
Aastically also their inter-
,n parallel. Both are head-
oward industrial relations
Maslin from the economic
ach and Domangue the psy-
ical.
llowing graduation this
Domangue beigns work
job for which he says he is
"grossly overpaid, a sys-
to which I hope to become
stomed."
lin, who will return in the
enter law school, gives his
ete approval to his col-
's plans.
may be putting me through
st years here," he declared.
ENTUALLY THEY plan to
ish their own industrial re-
stfirm-with Maslin han-
the legal angles and Do-
ue putting to use the experi-
he gains from his new job.
haven't decided who will
sident of this organization,"
declared. But if they con-
in their campus tradition,'
op post will probably shift
and forth annually.
vo German
ucators To
ike U' Visit
prominent German educa-
ow in this country studying
ducational methods will vis-
aUniversity this week.
Wolfgang Hunkel, pro-rec-
Heidelberg University, and
:ans Georg Rupp, head of
vision of Universities, Wuer-
rg-Baden Ministry of Educa-
will be honored on Wednes-
y an informal faculty din-
ccording to Prof. Esson M.
director of International
r.
le here, Dr. Hunkel and Dr.
will confer with University
ls on the organization and
istration of the colleges and
elations of U.S. universities
3states and public.
ir visit is sponsored by the
Office for Military Govern-
in Germany and the Ameri-
ouncil on Education.

By JOAN WILLENS
For students with that mid-summer yen for intellectual pursuits
as well as the ordinary post-school pleasures of sleep, swimming
and dancing, the United World Federalists have a perfect suggestion
Combining the opportunity to travel, hear noteworthy speakers
and discuss today's outstanding problems, the UWF will sponsor five
summer vacation institutes in the United States and two in Europe
* * * *
THE PURPOSE of these institutes, each of which lasts five days
is to help interested students become aware of problems of world
government in addition to summer's popular sports
Selected for their timeliness and universal appeal, "The UN and
World Government," "How Can We End the Cold War?" and "Whal
About Russia?" are just a few of the many topics which will be dis-
cussed.
Clifton Fadiman, noted author, lecturer and critic, Edgar
Mowrer, newspaper columnist, Merle Miller, former "Yank" edi-
tor, and Harold C. Urey, atomic scientist, are among the many
noted speakers who will address this summer's institutes.
The series of institutes held in the United States begins with
the one at Carleton College, in Northfield, Minn., from June 13 to 17
The others will take place at Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter
N.H., from June 26 to July 1; at Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass.
from July 3 to 10; at Asheville, N.C., from Aug. 28 to Sept. 3; and at
Pomona College, in Claremont, Calif., from Sept. 5 to 10.
* * * *
THE TWO European seminars will be held at Gottingen, Ger-
many, from July 2 to 17 and at Oxford, England, from July 22 to 29
Students interested in any of these institutes may contact Flc
Baron, '50, at 2-6581 for further information.

COLLEGE SHOP

U

They have been on the NSA,j

"BUT OUR WORK in

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fra adaatin9 1a44 and /a41~e4
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One Act Plays Slated
For Tuesday, Wednesday

EARRINGS

PARKER PENS

ALARM CLOCKS

Student actors, directors and
producers will present the speech
department's last bill of one-act
plays for the season at 8 p.m.
Tuesday and Wednesday in the
University High School Audito-
rium.
The four plays, chosen and di-
rected by students in te depart-
ment's directing course, will be
"When I Want You," by Joseph
B. White, '49; "Rosalind," by
James M. Barrie; "The Wandering
Dragon," by Wen Shun T'ang; and
"Xingu," by Thomas Selier.
"WHEN I WANT YOU" is being
given in accordance with the
speech department's policy of pre-
senting as many student-written
plays as possible. The play is an
attempt to showrwhat goes on in
the mind of a murderer during the
twenty minutes before a friend
will be executed for the crime he
committed.
"Rosalind" is a comedy about
an aging actress who has to keep
up the appearance of being a
young girl on the London stage.
She takes extended vacations in
a small-town rooming house so
that she can relax and act her
age.

Admission is free to the public.
Doors will be closed at 8 p.m.
and no one will be allowed to come
in after the performance has
started, according to the speech
department.
Carver Heads
Inter-Guflders
Harold Carver, 150A, represent-
ing the Baptist student group, was
elected president of Inter-Guild
Council at the annual spring re-
treat.
Other officers elected were:
Barbara Abar, vice-president and
representative of Gamma Delta-
Lutheran; Rosemary Jones, secre-
tary and member of Methodist
group and Marjorie Smith, '5Ed.,
treasurer and representative of the
Episcopal group.
The Inter-Guild Council is also
made up of representatives elected
by all the member student groups.
It is the coordinator of activities
for most of the Protestant groups
on campus.

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