100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 20, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FIA

FACULTY VIOLINIST:
Doktor To Solo at Detroit
LittleSymphonyConcert

Baldwin To Replace Littell at Lane Hall

i,

By ROMA LIPSKY
Paul Doktor, faculty member of
the University's Music School, will
be the featured viola soloist at the
first concert of the newly-formed
Detroit Little Symphony orchestra
at 8:15 p.m. Thursday in the De-
troit Art Institute.
The 30 member Little Sym-
phony, a chamber music ensemble,
is composed of members of the
Detroit Symphony.
They will present music often
overlooked by large symphonies,
and are experimenting with the
unique devise of playing without
a conductor, Doktor said.
"THE LITTLE SYMPHONY will
be a permanent organization no
matter what the directors and
sponsors of the regular Detroit or-
chestra decide to do about the
city's regular symphony next
year," he added.
Pointing out the advantages of
conductor-less playing in a
small group, Doktor explained
that it will enable the audience
to- enjoy the work of each in-

dividual player,
sometimes miss by
on the conductor.

which they
concentrating

This technique is best suited
to a chamber orchestra, which is
actually an enlarged string quar-
tet, he said.
"But of course it means that
the players have to be excellent
and very familiar with chamber
playing."
** *
IN THURSDAY'S concert, Dok-
tor will be featured in Hoffmeis-
ter's "Concerto for Viola and Or-
chestra," a work which he edited
and played in its American pre-
miere in Ann Arbor a few weeks
ago, and Marais' "Suite of French
Dances."
The program also includes
Mozart's Symphony No. 35
("Hoffner"), Ravel's "Tombeau
de y Couperin" and Rossinni's
overture to "La Scala di Seta."
Tickets, many of which are half-
priced for students, are on sale
in Ann Arbor at the Music Center.

Littell ...
Dr. Franklin H. Littell, director
f Lane Hall, has accepted a po-
sition as Religious Affairs Special-
ist for occupation forces in the
American zone in Germany.
- During his five years here, Dr.
Littell has inaugurated several
changes and improvements in stu-
dent religious work. He establish-
ed Inter-Guild, Protestant student
federation on campus.
* * *
ALSO INITIATED during this
period were the Michigan Student
Christian Convocation for coop-
eration among Protestant organi-
zations and the annual Confer-
ence for Small Group Techniques.
]In addition, a new constitu-
tion patterned on the federal-
ism of the 24 campus religious
groups has been set up for the
Student Religious Association
under Dr. Littell's direction.
Under the sponsorship of the
SRA, Religion-in-Life Week was
reinstated thisyear for the first
time since 1931.
During Dr. Littell's administra-
tion, the campus Religious Coun-
cil, providing religious consulta-
tions among student directors, be-
came a part of the University's
counseling program.
IN A LETTER to Dr. Littell,
Prof. Frank Huntley, chairman of
the Board of Governors of Lane
Hall, cited as outstanding the
"signal development in the pro-
gram and facilities of Lane Hall."
Dr. Littell's assignment will

Jacob on>

* * * 4'

-Daily-Alex Lmanian
LANE HALL DIRECTORS-Dr. Franklin H. Littell (right), direc-
tor of Lane Hall since 1944, shakes' hands with DeWitt C. Baldwin
(left), newly appointed director. Dr. Littell is leaving May 22
for religious work with American occupation troops In Germany.
* * * *

Baldwin ...
A student-centered program is
the main objective of the work
at Lane Hall for nexty ear, ac-
cording to DeWitt C. Baldwin,
newly appointed director of Lane
Hall.
"In assuming directorship, I in-
tend first of all to develop work
according to initiative and lead-
ership of students," Baldwin said.
"I HOPE THAT Lane Hall de-
velops into a religious center where
students may have practical ex-
periences in applying religion to
campus life," Baldwin continued.
He explained that these ob-
jectives will be carried out in
seven departments set up in the
SRA. Departments planned are
social action, public relations,
social and recreational, inter-
cultural, study and discussion,
relief, and out-state.
Baldwin, program director of
the SRA since September, is also
known as the founder and na-
tional director of Lisle Fellow-
ship, a student program in inter-
national living.
BEFORE COMING to Ann Ar-
bor, Baldwin served as Student
Secretary for the Board of Mis-
sions of the Methodist church.
In 1923 Baldwin and his wife
went to Rangoon, Burma as edu-
cational missionaries. While
there he served as pastor of the
English - speaking Methodist
church and district superinten-
dent for Indian-speaking Meth-
odist work.
Baldwin also acted as chaplain
for the nonconformist British
troops and worked with college
student groups in Burma.
Fordham University
SCHOOL OF LAW
NEW YORK
Three-Year Day Course
Four-Year Evening Course
Co-Educational
Member of Assn. of Amer. Law Schools
Matriculantsrmust be college graduates
and present full transcript
of college record.
CLASSES BEGIN SEPT. 26th, 1949
Forfurther information address
Registrar, Fordham University
SCHOOL OF LAW
302 Broadway, New York 7, N.Y.

I

U

v_

I

BLUE BOOKS
ALL SIZES
at
SWIFT'S DRUG STORE
340 S. State St.
Refresh yourself at our
modern soda fountain.

be with "free churches" as a
liaison agent for occupation
troops. He will work with 60 or
more denominations with head-
quarters at Frankfurt.

WORLD-WIDE THEME:-
Wesleyan Carnival Funds To
BringDisplaced Student to U'

A carnival with a new twist will
offer cosmopolitan entertainment
to students and Ann Arborites to-
night at the Wesleyan Guild build-
ing, State and Huron streets.
Called "D' Project," the carnival
is being presented by the Guild, a
student Methodist organization, to
raise funds to bring a displaced
person to the University as a stu-
dent next year.
Journa' To Air
News Stories
Three dramatized news stories
will be featured on the Michigan
Journal of the Air at 2:30 p.m. to-
day, over WUOM and WKAR.
"Tough Employment Picture
Looms For College Grads"; "Just
Knock on Wood"; and "The New
Approach - Salesmanship Joins
Hands with Science" are today's
Journal Headlines.
Written by Robert Riskin, Wil-
liam Wycoff, Robert White and

IN KEEPING with its purpose,
the carnival is based on an inter-
national theme. It will get under
way with a supper featuring such
exotic Chinese; Indian and Ha-
waiian dishes as paketa, hekka,
nanavati and fumi.
The usual sort of carnival
booths will be in operation, but
the big attraction will be a
South Sea Island party, com-
plete with swaying palm trees
and a tropical moon gleaming
on the shiny dance wax.
Highlight of the party will be an
authentic Hawaiian floor show,
with songs and dances performed
by Hawaiian students.
IN ADDITION, "D' Project" will
offer a "Wesleyenne Revue Fan-
tastique," a variety show featur-
ing a comical-classical orchestra
under the direction of Paul Miller,
'49 SM.
Opening at 6 p.m., festivities
will continue until midnight.
To Aid Travelers
Manfred Vernon, of the political

Dr. Littell explained that the
"free churches" in Germany in-
,lude the Methodist, Mennonite,
Arabian, Congregational and Bap-
tist churches.
HE HAS WRITTEN a book and
several articles on German church
history. His special field is the
problem of religious liberty and
the status of voluntary religious
associations in state-church lands.
Dr. Littell and his family will
leave Ann Arbor May 22 and will
sail from New York to Bremer-
haven June 1.
VET'S
WATCH REPAIR
Said the swabbie to the watch
officer, "How about faxing ine
Blue Front - State & Packard
West Lodge PX - Willow Lodge
Community Drugs-E. Ann Arbor

ti Coedstanning
for blue book ball
- -.
............
.............
~3
CAMPUS WOMEN are soaking up the sun this week with
"1 high hope of going to the Blue Book Boll flatteringly tanned.
This final social fling before exams will take place in the
Union Ballroom this FRIDAY, MAY 20. V
(advertisement)
" 1 ::"""}: tV.,t:\". 9i."";s. ." :..
f1dJ.. :ii:

----

AMERICA

Flirtatious as a fluttering eyelash
our ruffled cotton
MIDRIFF TOP
A sassy little midriff frothed with eyelet
and in such an assortment of colors you'll
several at this trifling price.

trim,
want

Luana Kampthe program will be science department, will answer
directed by Jack Jensen. questions for students planning to
The cast includes Esther Blauer, travel and study this summer in
Dick Charlton, Tom Cramer, Bill Europe or Mexico at a "get-to-
McKenzie, Doug Sinn, Hayes gether" at 4 p.m. today in Rm.
Schumacher, Bill Diefenback and 3D of the Union, sponsored by
Rarry Laughlin. the NSA Travel Bureau.

$2

"Free government-of the people
-by the people-for the people."
Thesed
the Symibols

is the one place where they have
ever existed in combination...

i

11

A

accessories

When we talk about our Ameri-
can system, we're talking about
something more productive, more
promising, more thrilling than any
system the world has ever seen.
And we're strong because we en-
joy the unique combination of qual-
ities that make our nation the most
productive of any country on earth.
Why?
First, because we've built our
whole system on a solid faith and
belief in the dignity of the in-
dividual.
Out of our belief in the dignity
of the individual has evolved the
wonderful pattern of America. Our
policy of free markets and free

collective bargaining. Our belief in
competition. Our adherence to the
principle of constantly better qual-
ity at consistently lower cost.
Our emphasis on research-on
invention-on new and better
methods.
Our faith in the future and our
desire ever to advance-ever to
improve the lot of everybody, re-
gardless of race, creed or c'olor.
These-in corn.bination-are
America. And nowhere else in the
world is there such a combination
--that's your U.S.A. Let's keep it
this way. Sure our system has its
faults-but in correcting those, and
with even better teamwork, the
future is unlimited.

J aCoL sor

16-INCH TELEVISION
AT ITS MAGNIFICENT BEST
IN THE NEW
In Television alone, Television with AM
and FM Radio, or Television with Radio

of

r

t { 1 ~r j
f 'I
, K. .
, ..
,.
\'1:.a'<'. 1, , ;. rat . ,Ea.: A
a< e, 6
C. a k
.
>
^'',:
$ ..
.},t;ti
.::; .
:5. ..;..
S 91' - , .3+r

Phonograph

Combination - the new

Freed-Eisemann is outstanding for

its

ge clear picture, superb tonal quality
I distinguished cabinets.
SEE THEM EXCLUSIVELY AT THE

Your
"More goods of better qut
lo wercost., paying higher

Future!I
1/V
Know-how-and inventiveness."
atiya

'"Sound use of machine powe

"Free markets and competition."

CREPE SOLED OXFORDS
A campus fashion first
A heavy cushioned crepe soled shoe that's a

_-
,,.
-,-- ,,
' /
~ : ..
.

L,

r

"~Our right to choose."

N NF~rAt

1111 1

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan