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May 19, 1949 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DXiLY rT*UsDA

,Y, M

CARNIVAL PLANN

E) "

Wesleyan Guild Project
To Raise Funds for DP

COURSES, REGIS TRATION:
SL Expects To Aid Incoming Students

"D' Project" of the Wesleyan
Guild, the student Methodist or-
ganization, hopes to earn enough
money to bring a displaced per-
son to campus as a student next
year.
"D' Project" is the name given
Grad Wins Jet
Study Award
Sin-I Cheng, '49, Grad., has
been awarded a Guggenheim fel-
lowship for advanced study in the
field of jet propulsion.
He is one of three youthful sci-
entictq receiving the awards which
provide for advanced study at the
Uuggenheim Jet Propulsion Cen-
ter at Princeton University.
Cheng has been serving as a re-
search assistant at the University's
Pronulsion Laboratory since re-
ceiving his master's degree from
the University last winter.

to a cosmopolitan sort of carnival
which the Guild is presenting at
6 p.m. tomorrow in its building at
State and Huron Streets.
TO ATTRACT CASH for its dis-
placed person project, the group
plans an international supper fea-
turing Chinese, Indian and Ha-
waiian dishes.
After the supper, a comic-
classic. orchestra will take the
spotlight as it plays for a large
musical and dramatic produc-
tion. Meanwhile, carnival con-
cession booths will operate full
tilt, and technicolor movies of
England will be shown.
The miniature Michigras will
also offer a South Sea Island Par-
ty, complete with a Hawaiian
floorshow, to attract all students
who are susceptible to the lures of
the South Seq s.
All students are welcome be-
tween the hours of 6 and 12 in tne
evening, according to Rosemary
Jones of the Wesleyan Guild.

The Student Legislature's Stu-
dent Experts are ready for action
this fall,
Under the direction of Frank
Butorac, '51, Experts will be avail-
able in the literary college under
Charles Murray, and in the engi-
neering college under Herbert
VanBurgel, '50E.
THE PROGRAM is designed to
supplement the University's Aca-
demic Counselors' service of assist-
ing freshmen and transfer stu-
dents in choosing subjects, and
registering.

Experm will receive meals andI
early registratioji privileges forf
their services, Butorac said.
They will be operating 9 a.m. to
noon and 1 to 4 p.m. Sept. 19 to
Sept. 21. Literary College Experts
will be in Rm. 25 Angell Hall and
engineering Experts in Rm. 348,
West Engineering Bldg.
LITERARY EXPERTS will ad-
vise students in astronomy, bot-
any, business administration.
chemistry. economics, education,
English, fine arts, geography, geol-
ogy, German. Greek. history, jour-
nalism. mathematics, music, phil-

osoplhy, physics. political science,
pne-law. pnre-med, psychology, Ro-
mance Lan guagies, sociology,
speech, teachers' certificate and
zoology.
Engineering Experts will
counsel students in rmechanical,
civil, aeronautical, electrical,
chemical, metallurgical and ma-
rine engineering, engineering
mechanics, engineering physics
andi mathematics.
Additional Experts will be avail-
able to give information on ex-
tra-curricular activities and Frosh-
Soph Week.

In Ann Arbor
508 E. William St.

/S

/'

THAT POST-BLUE BOOK CELEBRATION--A typical view of what members of the Class of '49
have to look forward to when 300 of them and their guests cruise the Great Lakes June 5 to 7 on
the S. S. North American. The trip, including meals and round-trip transportation from Ann Arbor
to Chicago and back, will cost $37.40. Students not wishing to make the entire trip may have the
specific part deducted from the total cost. Although the trip is sponsored by students in the

I

GABARDINE
liack4

795

Choose your slacks from these
fine selections of Wool Gabar-
dines, rayon reinforced, fully
pleated, zipper fly, and fine
tailoring throughout. Blue, grey,
brown and tan. Sizes 28-42.

literary college, all students may
Vet Bureau Moves
The Veterans Service Bureau
has moved its office from the
Rackham Bldg. to Rmn. 555, Ad-
ministration Bldg., Charles A. Cor-
rell, head of the Bureau has an-
nounced.
Summer
Savings
with NSA
PURCHASE CARDS
Merchants of the follow-
ingrcities honor Purchase
Cards:'
Detroit
New York City
Chicago
Buffalo
Jersey City
Boston
Minneapolis
Philadelphia
Bethlehem
Montclair
New Brunswick
Miami
ON SALE
WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY
ADMINISTRATION BLDG.
1:00 - 4:30

b

COTTON WASH SLACKS

FOR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT:
Name Regent Hayward
OnCitizens Commission

apply. Seniors, h:wever, will be given preference.

Seersucker, etc.
Sanforized .....

398

University Regent Ralph A.
Hayward has been named to the
newly-formed National Citizens
Commission for the Public Schools.
The commission was formed by
a group of prominent citizens and
is dedicated to the improvement
of public schools.
* * *
THE NEW commission members
have said that they were "aroused
by the continuing nationwide
crisis inthe public schools" and
that they wvill work for "concert-
ed action by citizens in their local
communities."
The commission has received
initial support from the Car-
negie Corporation and the
General Education Board.
The action has been hailed by
President James B. Conant of
Harvard University as "potentially
the most important move for the
advancement of publicveducation
taken in the last 50 years."
* * *
THE COMMISSION is composed
exclusively of non-educators, most
of them from the fields of busi-
ness, labor, law and publishing.
Roy E. Larsen, president of Time
Inc., is chairman of the group.
Others serving on the 28-man
commission include George Gal-
lup, director of the American In-
stitute of Public Opinion; Wal-
ter Lippman, columnist and au-
thor; Beardsley Ruml, origina-
tor of the pay-as-you-go income.
tax plan and Raymond Rubli-
cam, head of Young and Rubi-
cam Inc., advertising agency.
Hayward is president of a large
Kalamazoo parchment company
and has long been active in civic
affairs. He graduated from the
University in 1917 and once held a

professorship here in chemical
engiliec ring.
During the war he served on
numerous government boards and
agencies.
Patter. Plans
Science Talk
To Lecture on 'heart'
In Washington Series
Dr. Bradley M. Patten will be
the fifth University faculty mem-
ber to lecture in the general basic
science course in Washington,
D.C.
Dr. Patten, chairman of the an-
atomy department in the medical
school will lecture all day tomor-
row on the cardiovascular system
with special attention on heart de-
velopment, circulation changes at
birth and heart defects dating
from birth.
SPONSORED BY the Army
Medical Department Research and
Graduate School, the postgradu-
ate course for doctors is held an-
nually from' January to June, with
guest lecturers from various medi-
cal school faculties.
Other University faculty
members who have served as lec-
turers during the current sea-
son are Dr. L. H. Newburgh,
professor of clinical investiga-
tion and Dr. Howard B. Lewis,
John Jacob Abel, University pro-
fessor of biological chemistry.
The list concludes with Dr. Jer-
ome W. Conn, associate professor
of internal medicine; and Dr. Gor-
don L. Moe, associate professor of
pharmacology.

-1
wth ,
JUST AROUND THE CORNER OF MAY
R ADIOS and PHf NOS
aurn summer vacations and weekends-out-of-doors into
"super-fun" occasions this year, by taking along one
of these moderately-priced radios or phonographs. See the
complete selection, in a wide range of prices, tomorrow at
Lyon & Healy. Choose portables, too, as wedding and
graduation gifts . . . and you'll be warmly thanked!
1. Full-toned, handy-size 3-Way Portable .
Playing on AC or DC current or on its long-life
battery, this lightweight portable is a welcome
companion at home or on the go! With glor-
ious voice of the "Golden Throat" tone system
in durable maroon plastic case with non-
tarnish gold-color trim . . . an outstanding
value! Only $34.95 plus batteries. 1

I' '

ANN ARBOR CLCLOTHING
113 South Main

IL

li

I I

In keeping with
the purpose of the

C

2. PHONOMASTER Spring-Wind Phono-
graph . . . plays 10-in. and 12-in.
records with remarkable clarity and
volume. Spring motor. Record com-
partment in lid. Blue simulated leath-
er. Originally $29.95. Now Specially
Priced, $9.95.
3. EMERSON Battery - Operated Radio
... gives 100 hours' listening pleasure
without charging. Only 8V2-in. x 7-
in. x 4-in., it packs a powerful 4-tube
superheterodyne circuit, Alnico 5
speaker. Maroon plastic case. Less
batteries, $19.95

"GOOD NEIGHBOR FLEET"
Moore-McCormack Lines offers

V,

3.

2.

Read ... and Use Daily Classified Ads.

I

SPECIAL

REDUCTIONS

for

STUDENTS
and TEACHERS

in 38-Day Cruise and
Round-Trip Fares to
SOUTH

"Good Neighbor" service by the S. S.
BRAZIL, S. S. URUGUAY and S. S.
ARGENTINA was originally estab-
lished to stimulate better acquaintance-
ship with the lands and peoples of
South America. This announcement is
in keeping with that purpose-designed
to make it easier for students and
teachers from the United States to visit
the nations of our great sister continent.
The special reduction will be made
available only to those who supply cre-
dentials of eligibility and will apply to
minimum-fare First Class accommoda-
tions and Cabin Class accommodations
only. It will be offered through the
Summer vacation period, and to mem-
bers of the teaching profession on sab-
batical leave through the Decemner 7,
1949 sailing.
In addition to applying to 38-Day
Cruises, the special fare reduction will
also be offered with 2 and 4-week stop-
overs. Arrangements permit a 2-week
stopover at any South American port or
two 2-week stopovers at two different
ports; all-inclusive rates including hotel
accommodations for the stopover pe-
riods are being established.
Sailings from New York
S. S. ARGENTINA, June 3
C C R A 7TT r... 77

Li t
f L ^"

p

I

At the CAMPUS BOOTERY
ANNUAL COLLEGE-END
MEN'S and
WOMEN'S
This will be a real sale - We must greatly reduce our
$30,000.0 STOCK OF FINE SHOES
Before thousands of students - teachers and others leave Ann Arbor
for the summer vacation. All new shoes just received INCLUDED
IN THIS OUR GREATEST SALE IN MANY YEARS.
FOR MEN FOR WOMEN
10% - 15% to 25% off 15% - 25% to 50% off

0

AMERICA
Also Special 2-Week and 4-Week
Stopover Arrangements

A great opportunity to visit the
fascinating lands of South America
during the best season of the year.
Mild, sunny weather, ideal for
sightseeing, prevails from June
through September; cities are at
their most active; cultural and
social seasons are in full swine.

- New Styles by Bostonian - Weyenburg -
Plymouth - Pine Tree - Saco-moc and some
U K Florshei ms.

Newest styles - over 1500 pairs by Flor-
sheims - Footrest - Jolene - Enna Jettick -
Lucky Stride.
10 AnAA air voac's - enrt - casunl wn

i

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