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May 18, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WARNING TO TALK:
Shady Trails Camp Aids
Boys with Speech Defects

Pioneering in the field of speech
improvement for over 16 years,
Shady Trails; University Speech
Improvement Camp offers a
summer of training and recreation
for dozens of boys with special
speech problems.
Located on the shores of the
Grand Traverse Boy at Northport,
Michigan, Shady Trails was
founded as a non-profit organiza-
tion in 1932 by John N. Clancy,
assistant to Prof. Harlan Bloomer,
director of the University Speech
Clinic.
Arch School
Adds Course
For Summer
A course in "Regional Planning
and Land Utilization" will be of-
fered for the first time this
summer by the College of Archi-
tecture and Design.
Students will study the prob-
lems of metropolitan regions, ur-
ban growth and national policies
of industrial expansion. Problems
in conservation of natural re-
sources, including water, minerals
and forestry will also be discussed.
The new course will be taught
by Prof. John W. Hyde. It is open
to juniors, seniors and graduate
students +from all colleges, and it
is being offered for three credit
hours.

OPENING THAT YEAR with
only four boys enrolled, the camp
has grown into a modern plant
valued at well over $100,000 and
accommodating between 80 and 90
boys and young men every
summer
Originally staffed with Uni-
versity faculty and students and
always closely affiliated with the
Speech Clinic, a grant from the
Krege Foundation enabled the
University to buy the camp ear-
lier this year.
It will now be administered as
a part of the University Summer
Session and function under the
jurisdiction of the speech depart-
ment.
THE CAMP PROGRAM is de-
signed "to establish a carry-over
of newly learned speech patterns
from the classroom to everyday
living situations," according to di-
rector Clancy.
In addition to the usual camp-
ing activities such as swimming,
craft work and sports, the boys
spend about five hours a day in
class under the direction of
skilled speech correctionists.
Activities such as dramatics, fo-
rums and after-dinner speaking
are also designed to aid the camp-
ers in adjusting themselves to
speech situations.
"The boys all have one major
ambition-to learn how to talk,
and since they have this common
bond of effort they are able to un-
derstand each other's problems
and work them out together,"
Clancy said.

Ratify New
Constitutiont
ForSeniors
A new constitution for the senior
lass of the literary college was
unanimously approved by the Sen-
ior Board at its last meeting.
The document, drawn up by the
2onstitution committee of the
.card, heaced by Barbara Whit-
ng, provides for senior class ad-
ministrative officers and for the
continuance of the senior board.

*

*

A^Mr

-Daly-Wally Barth
PREMIERE MEMENTO-This two foot square cement tablet commemorating the world's first au-
thor's premiere is now on display at the University Museum. The tablet was constructed for the
opening of "It Happens Every Spring," movie based on a story by Shirley W. Smith, University vice
president emeritus. It was inscribed by Carleton Angell, University sculptor.

IMPORTED GIFTS U
See our jewelry, silver or jeweled bracelets,
necklaces, and earrings, silk scarves and
materials . . . Chess Sets . . . Knick Knacks.
India Art Shop
330 Maynard Street

;a-ra

41

GRADUATION
ISSUE
with

Mercy Killing
Unethical Says
Harvard Dean
Reverence for individual life is
the ethical basis of the medical
profession and "mercy killing" is
in opposition to that principle, Dr.
Willard L. Sperry, dean of thel
Harvard Divinity School, declared'
yesterday.
Speaking on "The Moral Prob-
lems in the Practice of Medicine,"
under the auspices of the medical
school, Dr. Sperry said that the
confidence of the public in doc-
tors might be undermiped by wide-
spread practice of euthanasia, or
"mercy killing.''
* * *
NOTING THAT new cures are
constantly being found for prev-
iously "incurable" diseases, Dr.
Sperry stated that it was the bus-
iness of the medical profession "to
save life-not to take it."
He said that any system of
legalized euthanasia would prob-
ably have to be administered by
a permanent panel of doctors,
and questioned the advisability
of forcing such high moral re-
sponsibility on a few men.
Regarding the value of prolong-
ing life artificially, Dr. Sperry
said that he saw no moral ob-
ligation to keep a dying patient
alive through mechanical means
for overlong periods of time. But
he cautioned against too easy and
too quick disposal of a man's life.
* * *
"DOCTORI ShOULDN'T be too
hasty in telling a patient the truth
about his chances," Dr. Perry con-
cluded. "It depends on how sure
they are of their own diagnosis,
and of the patient's ability to 'take
it.'

The National Student Associa-
tion Travel Bureau will close to-
morrow at 4:45 p.m.
Tomorrow is the last day to
apply for travel and study tours
of European, North and South
American and Asiatic countries.
STUDENTS planning to join
study or travel groups to Mexico
this summer will have until May
31 to apply. Applications will be
available at the Office of Student
Affairs after the Bureau closes.
"I would like to emphasize
to students planning on going
UWF Chapter
Elects Officers
The United World Federalists
elected next semester's officers at
a final meeting last night.
The new officers are: president,
Florence Baron, '50; vice presi-
dent, Allen Hurd, '50; recording
secretary, Patricia MacMahon, '52;
corresponding secretary, Cheryl
Yoshihara, '50; treasurer, Bradley
Storrer, '52.
Members-at-large for the Exec-
utive Council are: Francis Blair,
'52 Spec, and Harry Blackwell,
'51L.
Committee chairmen appointed
by Miss Baron were: political ac*
tion, Allen Robertson, '50 and
round table discussions, Sam Dud-
ley, '50BAd.
The group plans to work for a
referendum calling for election of
Michigan delegates to attend a
World People's Constitutional
Convention for world government.

abroad that their last chance
to apply is tomorrow," NSA Bu-
reau chairman Sue Sirs said.
Summer sessions will be avail-
able at colleges and Universities
in almost every major country in
the world, from Canada to Japan.
G.I. BENEFITS will be honored
up to $350 in some cases. Intensive
language courses will be offered
in the native countries, including
French, Spanish and German.
Language courses in French will
also be offered in Canadian
schools.
Travel projects will include
tours of countries by plane,'boat,
train, car, bicycle and on foot.
Tours will last from two weeks
to all summer, with cost ranging
from $200 to $1,500 and up.
Quarterdeck
Elects Officers

APPLICATIONS DUE:
Deadline for Foreign Tours
Set byNSA Travel Bureau

THE SENIOR BOARD, initiated
this year by Val Johnson, presi-
dent of the literary school, is com-
posed of a senior representative
from each housing group on cam-
pus. Sixty-five house groups par-
ticipated on the board this year.
According to the new consti-
tution the method of election of
class officers will be determined
by the rules committee of the
Student Legislature.
All candidates must have been
in residence at the University for
a year preceding election and must
plan to be here for the following
two semesters, the constitution
states.
IN ADDITION to the four sen-
ior class executive officers, the
constitution provides for nine
standing committees: activities,
announcements, cap and gown, fi-
nance, information, memorial,
publicity, reunion, and Senior
Ball.
The chairmen of these com-
mittees are to be selected by the
class officers from those seniors
petitioning in the fall semester.
Also at its final meeting, the
Board drew up three alternate
plans for the election of class of-
ficers. They are to be reviewed
and one chosen by the Student
Legislature.
Goethe's W orks
Now on Display
In honor of the bi-centennial
,elebration of Johann von Goethe's
birth, the General Library has ar-
ranged a special exhibit this week.
Included in the display are fac-
similies of Goethe's drawings and
manuscripts, printed editions of
his letters and conversations, and
one or more copies of each of his
major works.
A School of Business-Preferred by
College Men and Women
4 M6ONTH
INTE N , VE COURSE
SECRETARIAL TRAINING FOR COLLEGE
StUDENTS AND GRADUATES
A thorough, intensive course-starting
June, October, February. Bul-
letin A on request
O
1 SPECIAL COUNSE~LOR for G.I. TRAINING

Druggists Wage Price War
LOS ANGELES- Il)-With the battle-cry "we will not be under-
sold," two Los Angeles neighborhood drugstores are waging the wildest
price-cutting war this city has ever seen.
IT ALL STARTED three weeks ago and peace is not in sight.
Thrifty, a California chain, has been located in the area for a number
of years. Whelan's. a national chain, opened up a store on the oppo-
site corner three weeks ao. That did it!
Since then each store has averaged about 25,000 customers a
day.
Prices, set at normal levels each morning. change so fast as the
daily war begins that clerks can't keep up,
ONE STOPPED in Whelan's for lunch. He ordered a 10 oz. porter-
house steak plate, a special at 89 cents. By the time he got through
eating it, he only had to pay 59 cents.
Good QUEEN LIZZIE
would've had 'em in a tizzy...
1 -4
r\
if she'd worn a
'iZ~rBO DSOLD
AT * , orVES EVERyW
See theum in Detroit at J. L. HUDSON
Free booklet "WARDROBE TRICKS". Write Judy Bond, Inc.,Dpt.K,1315 Broadway, New Yrk18
J acokson>L
(
,WL K s " f j* a
.hhhhh O
a .X -

I

"/LOOK'S"/

SURVEY

EXCHANGE CARTOONS

MAY 23

Al

kL wrage and nylon -
Jere rne ,at for each other!
- X,
t "F
Ott

Quarterdeck, Marine Engineer- Regular Day and
ing Society, elected officers and Throughout th
installed new members at a recent Director, Paul
banquet.
The following officers were T H E G R E G
elected: George Matson, '50E, 37 S. Wabash Ave.
commodore; Richard W. Christie,
'50E, vice-commodore; Richard An Am azin
Davis, '50E, Purser; Robert L.
Wilchar, '50E, program chairman;
Raymond O. Anderson, '50E, mem-
bership chairman; Nicholas T.
Drossos, '50E, Steward. Pipe M
Members who received keys and the pipe that every smo
scrolls at therbanquet in recog- modempipe, with b
nition of their initiation to the num shankwad gen
society are: Constantine Foltis,
,51E Rayre E. Kaufman, John
Smith, '51E and David Hammock, "
'51E. 500
~ with inside wrappers
Appoint BroHPage X
Prof. Arthur W. Bromage, of the!
political science department and
Alderman on the Ann Arbor Com-
mon Council, was appointed to the.
State Housing Board of AppealsO
last night.
The Council also denied permis-
sion to Young Progressives to ----
make use of a sound truck in Ann
Arbor to advertise collection of
food for striking Ford workers.

Evening Schools
e Year. Catalog
M. Pair, M.A.
G COLLEGE
Cicago 3, Illinois
g Offer by
Mixture
Oker wants-DANA, the
brightl yW shed alumi
vie rnoed brar bow~

l1 1

Summer Frost . . . our
COTTON BATISTE BLOUSE
Foam-frothed blouse, made high at the throat
by a mandarin collar, pertly ruffled, and inset
with an eyelet bib front and sleeves. In white
only; sizes 32 to 38.
7.95

sm a OIAT mopvrs I
4W yer DANA PIPE
Send to
IUW, huit CII,lcbmoid, titgiuk
?tr Limited to USA--ftok e
June 30, 1949

SORRY

..... - - --------- -

but after Monday, May

16, we
to ac-

J acobonid.

will

no longer be able

11

I

cept orders by phone for Daily
CLASSIFIED,
The Daily uses student help,
and our books must be closed
before exams.

Summer
Savings
with NSA
PURCHASE CARDS
Merchants of the follow-
ing cities honor Purchase
Cards:
Detroit
New York City
Chicago
Buffalo
Jersey City
Boston
&A rr~nn I;.

DENIMS

are underfoot

Faded Blue

with crepe soles
by JOYCE
of California

Tailored, tucked and touched with Val
lace for ultimate perfection, this Bur-
Mil Nylomist cap sleeve blouse is ideal
for Spring suits. This fabric will not
shrink, needs no ironing and will keep

11

HOWEVER, drop

in at the

6.95

III f- . . 1°Y S 1 . r-% . I I . 111

III

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