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May 14, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SI- THE MICHIGAN DAILY

RAMA SEASON:
'Twelfth Night' To Inject
Classic Note in Festival

Co-ops Omit
Race Blocks

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN,

1

(Continued from Page 1)

Lydia Mendelssohn's stage is a
umoll of activity as two separ-
te casts prepare Ann Arbor's
rama menu for the weekend and
eek to come.
With two performances of Eu-
ent O'Neill's "Ah, Wilderness"
cheduled for today, the finishing
ouches are being added to
land Concert
ro BeGiven
The Varsity Band, with Jack
ee conducting, will present a twi-
ght concert at 7:30 p.m. Tues-
a.y on the steps of Angell Hall.
Included in the program will be
wide variety of selections, from
. Vaughan Williams to the great
iarch-master, Sousa. Seven'
iershwin songs will be heard, in
ddition to Tschaikowsky's "None
ut the Lonely Heart," with Lee
tewart playing a cornet solo.
The Varsity Band is one of the
hree bands associated with the
rniversity. It was formed at the
nd of the football season and now
onsists of fifty-five members,
me of wBom are transfers from
he Marching Band.

"Twelfth Night" opening at 8:30
p.m. Tuesday.
"TWELFTH NIGHT" will offer
a classic note in contrast to more
contemporary selections such as
"As You Desire Me", "The Heir-
ess" -and "Night Must Fall", which
fill the remainder of the Drama
Season schedule.
Three rising young actresses,
Francis Reid, Neva Patterson,
and Mary Jackson will play the
leading female roles in Shakes-
peare's traditional comedy.
Starring with Miss Reid in the
production will be Arnold Moss
and Carl Benton Reid.
Moss, a seasoned actor, has
filled leading roles in "The Fifth
Column", "The Land is Bright",
"The Tempest" and "Front Page".
He has also appeared on radio and
television.
In addition to 12 University stu-
dents, the cast includes Jon Daw-
son, Philip Tonge and Harry
Townes.
Season tickets and seats for in-
dividual performances are on sale
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the box
office of Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre.

people of various races and reli-
gions to live together as closely as
we do. The Co-ops are evidence
that inter-racial living is not only
possible, but profitable," Davis
emphasized.
Davis pointed to the growth
of the Co-op movement at the
University as proof of its attrac-
tion for students.
In 1932, Michigan House, the
first local Co-op, was founded, its
members merely renting the house.
TEN YEARS LATER the Uni-
versity boasted no less than 13
Co-ops. The war, however, brought
with it a severe decline in enroll-
ment, and consequently in the
number of Co-op houses.
At present, though, Co-ops are
again on the rise, Davis said,
pointing out that the acquisition
of Nakamura House last year
brought the number of houses
to six, three men's and three
women's, all of which are owned
by the Inter-Cooperative Coun-
ci.
The fact that Co-op members
themselvestmade loans to help buy
Nakamura House indicates their
great faith in the Co-op move-
ment, Davis declared.
That many more students are
eager to become Co-op members is
demonstrated by the fact that at
the beginning of this semester
there were twice as many appli-
cants as vacancies, Davis assert-
ed.
Sunday: Off-campus Housing
Senior Survey
Seniors who received question-
naires from the literary college
may turn the completed forms in
at the desk in the lobby of Angell
Hall beginning tomorrow, the lit-
erary college has announced.

(Continued from Page 4)
ington University, will speak on
"The Origin of Elements and Its'
Cosmogonical Consequences." 2
p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Those interested are invited.
Coming Events
Graduate Outing Club: Meet
Sun., May 15, 2:30 p.m., northwest
entrance, Rackham Building, for
hiking and swimming. Sign supper
list at Rackham checkroom desk
before noon Saturday. All gradu-
ates welcome.

turing Art Hodes' Greenwich Vil-
lage All-Stars. Sun., May 15, 8
p.m., Hill Auditorium. Tickets on
sale at box office.
I.Z.F.A.: Lag B'Orer picnic.
Group will meet at W.A.B., 3 p.m.,
Sun., May 15.
Seager Located
In New York City
University student Loren Seager,
'52E, who has been missing for 12
days, was located yesterday.
He is in New York City and has
a job. Informed sources said he
does not plan to return to campus
--at least for the remainder of the
semester.
Seager disappeared after leav-
ing a note to roommates saying he
was 'going to Detroit to go sail-
ing."

Sociedad Hispanica:
Hour, Mon., May 16, 4 to
International Center.

Social
6 p.m.,

U. of M. Hot Record Society: A
live Dixieland Jazz Concert fea-

lilt___________ __

I

-Daily-Wally Barth
LOVER'S REVENGE-The Minotaur, Jim Smith, '49SM, lies dying in the lap of his beloved
Maira, Marilyn Scheer, '49, in "The Death of the Minotaur" which will be presented at 8 p.m. to-
morrow in the University High School Auditorium as part of the first Student Arts Festival. The
jealous lover, Theseus of Athens, still holding the murder weapon in his hand, is played by Dave
Eclar, '49.

* * *

* * s

* *

Arts Festival Features Student Talent

BY ATTENDING THIS FREE PUBLIC LECTURE
entitled
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE:
HOW IT CAN HELP YOU
by
Archibald Carey, C.S.B. of Detroit, Michigan
Member of the Board of Lectureship of The Mother Church
The First Church of Christ, Scientist, in
Boston, Massachusetts

i

SORRY

The first two programs of the
Student Arts Festival will be pre-
sented by the Inter-Arts Union at
3 p.m. today in the League Ball-
room and at 8 p.m. today in the
University High School Audito-
rium.
The festival, one of the first of
its kind, aims at a presentation of
the various creative arts in a num-
ber of closely integrated exhibits.
THOMAS WILSON, Grad SM,

but after Monday, May 16,

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to ac-

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cept orders by phone for Daily

CLASSI Fl ED.

YES !

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The Da ily uses student help,
and our books must be closed

president of the Inter-Arts Union,
will formally open the afternoon
session with a brief statement of
the festival's purposes. James
Johnson Sweeney, director of the
department of painting and sculp-
ture of New York's Museum of
Modern Art, will then lecture on
"The Arts Today."
Following the lecture, the
University Symphony Orchestra
will play "Symphony in B" by
Leslie Bassett, Grad SM. The
symphony will be recorded for
broadcast at 7 p.m. Tuesday.
Tonight's program will include
several student-written musical
compositions, a one-act play, read-
ing of student poems and a panel
discussions of the arts.
* * *
THE FOUR faculty members
comprising the panel are Profes-
sors Norman Nelson and Allan
Seager of the English department,
Ross Lee Finney of the Music
School and Claribel Baird of the
speech department.
"The Death of the Minotaur,"
the one-act play by John Cook,
Grad, is under the direction of
Strowan Robertson.
The third program, at 3 p.m. to-
morrow in the League Ballroom,
Youtliful Recitalist
Plays Tomorrow
Youthful pianist Anne Ruth
Powers, will give a recital at 3
p.m. tomorrow in the Hussey Rm.,
League.
The 14-year old musician, stu-
dent of Kay Engel, grad., will play
a Gavotte by Bach, Handel's
"Passacaglia," a Haydn Sonata
and two Mazurkas by Ciopin.
Also on the program are three!
selections by Bartok, "Stumbling,"
"Wandering" and "Morning."
The program will be open to the
public.

will again feature student compo-
sitions and two short panel dis-
cussions. The first of the panels
will deal with "The Role of the De-
signer in Contemporary Society."
* * *
UNIVERSITY faculty members
George Forsyth. Juana de Laban,
Oliver Edel and Louise Cutler will
compose the second panel.
Original dances by the stu-
dent Modern Dance Group will
also be included in the after-
noon program.
Concluding tomorrow's festival,
an open forum discussion and an
informal reception will be held at
Lane Hall.
Paintings by student artists will
be on exhibition in the League
Ballroom during both days of the
festival.
L-

Rackhcm Lecture Hall
Under the auspices of
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
at the University of Michigan

III

Monday,

ALL ARE WELCOME

...

May

16, at 8:00 P.M.

Travel

before exams.

with'

HOWEVER, drop in at the
Student Publications Building,
420 Maynard St., and order the

'11

TRAVELER'S CHECKS
The safest and most convenient way
to carry your money
ANN ABO ANK

CLASSIFIEDS directly.

University Branch

330 S. State

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i

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9

At the CAMPUS BOOTERY
Annual College-End

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Reading Room, 211 East Washington
Michigan League Ballroom
10:30 A.M.: Sunday Lesson Sermon.
May 15: Mortals and Immortals.
11:45 A.M.: Sunday School.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday evening Testimonial
Meeting.
VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
(Interdenominational)
University Community Center
Willow Run Village
Rev. J. Edgar Edwards, Chaplain
10:45 A.M!: Church School and Nursery.
4:30 P.M.: Study and Discussion: Leaders, Mr.
and Mrs. William Winter and Mr. Robert
Shreffler.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper. - -
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
RogercWilliams Guild House
502 East Huron
10:00 A.M.: Bible Study Class. A study of the
teachings of Jesus.
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon, "The
Voice of Nature," by Rev. Loucks.
(The Guild will not meet tonight because of
the Retreat.)
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred Scheips, Pastor
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:00: Identical Services of
Worship. Sermon by the pastor, "May Christ
Abid in your Homes!" Annual Parents Day.
Sunday at 4:00 P.M.: Cornerstone Laying Cere-
mony for New Chapel and Center, 1523'Wash-
tenaw. Speaker, the Rev. E. H. Voss, of
Saginaw.
Sunday at 5:30: Gamma Delta Supper.
Friday at 6:00: Dinner and Evening for Married
Couples.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Adult Group. Prof. Shirley Allen on
"Conservation in Michigan."
11:00 A.M.: Services: "The Higher Patriotism."
6:30 P.M.: Unitarian Students with Rev. Merrill
0. Bates of Grosse Pointe on: "American Free-
dom and Catholic Power."

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL and
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Theodore R. Schmale, D.D.,
Walter S. Press, Ministers
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
9:30 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
5:30-7:00 P.M.: Student Guild.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan
F. E. Zendt, Minister to the Congregation
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
9:40 A.M.: Student Bible Class at the Church
10:50 A.M.: Morning Worship
Nursery for children during the service.
GUILD HOUSE, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Minister to Students
Jean Garee, Assistant in Student Work
Student Guild-6:00 supper at the Congregational
Church. Dramatic worship service in the sanc-
tuary.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
YMCA Bldg., Fourth Ave.
Carl York Smith, Minister
10:15 A.M.: Bible Study.
11:00 A.M.: "If the Lord Will."
7:30 P.M.: "The First Sin In the First Church."
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron
Harold J. DeVries, Pastor
9:15 A.M.: "Your Radio Choir" WPAG.
10:00 and 12:00: Bible School Sessions.
11:00 A.M.: Dr. Northcote Deck of Toronto, Can.
6:15 P.M.: Guild Supper.
7:30 P.M.: "A Second Chance."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Washington
Ministers: James Brett Kenno and
Erland J. Wang
Music: Lester McCoy, director
Mary McCall Stubbins, organist
Student Activities: Doris Reed, associate
director.
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. Dr. Kenno's ser-
mon topic: "A Tale of Two Churches."
5:30 P.M. Wesleyan Guild. Topic: "Religion in
the Curriculum.
ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
N. Division at Catherine

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MEN'S and
WOMEN'SS

M4
ta d'
t! i
1
R
':y ""
lif

This will be a real sale - We must greatly reduce our
$30,000.00 STOCK OF FINE
Before thousands of students - teachers and others leave Ann Arbor
for the summer vacation. All new shoes just received INCLUDED
IN THIS OUR GREATEST SALE IN MANY YEARS.

FOR MEN

10% - 15% to 25% off
New Styles by Bostonian - Weyenburg -
Plymouth - Pine Tree - Saco-moc and some
Florsheims.

FOR WOMEN
15% -25% to 50% off
Newest styles - over 1500 pairs by Flor-
sheims - Footrest - Jolene - Enna Jettick -
Lucky Stride.
I U __ A A. _.. ...r. E ,,,

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