100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 08, 1949 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILT

EEKUEND OF ART:
'U' Talent To Be Shown
In Student Arts Festival

!4

Student talent -music, drama,
poetry, dance and fine arts-will
be on display May 14 and 15 when
the newly formed Inter-Arts Union
presents the Student Arts Festi-
val a concerted weekend of the
arts.
Believed to be the only college
arts festival in the country, mem-
bers of the Union hope to make it
an annual event, according to Bob
Edge, spokesman of the group.
* * *
"THE PURPOSE of the Arts
Festival is to encourage student
participation in the creative arts
and to provide an audience for be-
ginners in such endeavors," Edge
said.
The Festival will officially get
under way 3 p.m. May 14 in the
League Ballroom with an intro-
ductory speech by Thomas Wil-
son, Grad, president of the Inter-
Arts Union.
He will be followed by James
Johnson Sweeney, director of the
department of painting and sculp-
ture of the New York Museum of
Modern Art, who will lecture on
"The Arts Today."
* * *
THE UNIVERSITY Symphony
Orchestra will play "Symphony in
B" composed by Leslie Bassett.

At 8 p.m. in University High
School Auditorium, a program
of musical compositions, a..one-
act play, a panel discussion of
the arts, and reading of student-
written poems, will be given.
Student compositions and two
short panel discussions will be fea-
tured at 3 p.m. Sunday in the
League Ballroom. The first of the
panels will deal with "The Role of
the Designer in Contemporary So-
ciety," and will be directed by Mar-
shall Frederick, sculpturer from
Cranbrook Academy. The second
panel will be composed of Univer-
sity faculty members.
* * *
IN ADDITION to the musical
compositions, the program will in-
clude a recital by the student Mod-
ern Dance Group who will present
a series of original compositions.
The Arts Festival will be con-
cluded Sunday night with an
open forum discussion and in-
formal reception at Lane Hall.
During the two days of the Fes-
tival, an exhibit of student paint-
ings and sculpture will be. open to
the public in the League Ballroom.
A series of ten broadcasts has
been arranged for the Festival
over station WUOM.

BACKSTAGE AT THE UNION-
DaveLeyshonls Opera UnsungHero
Dave Leyshon is the unsinging
and unsung hero of the Union
Opera.
The revival of the annual mu-j
sical extravaganza was mainly due
to his two years of hard work.
Left holding the bag when thev
rest of the original opera com-
mittee graduated soon after its
formation, Leyshon single-hand-v
edly continued the job of putting
"Froggy Bottom" on the boards.m
HIS FIRST theatrical venture
was an all-male army production.
"That show went off surpris-
ingly well," he said, "probably b a p l g s.k k
because people got such a kick '*" ..
out of seeing men dressed as
women.

Vet Center's
Plight Has
Pub lic Eye
The possible financial death of
the Veteran's Readjustment Cen-
ter drew further outside interest
yesterday as a staff of Detroit
Times photographers arrived here
to cover the clinic pictorially.
They snapped pictures of the
Center's seven occupational shops,
including several of the patients.
In addition, a few pictures were
taken of the Center lobby and the
building itself.
Meanwhile, controversy over the
state's refusal of operating grants
to the clinic still continued. Anx-
ious patients have been making
almost daily pilgrimages to Lan-
sing to contact their representa-
tives.

Marriage Talks Begin Today
Rev. H. L. Pickerill will open the church dining room are open to
Westminster Guild's series of three the public.
Sunday night lectures on marriage Other lectures which will follow
relations at 6:30 p.m. today in the on succeeding Sundays will be de-
social hall of the First Presbyter- livered by Rev. William H. Hen-
ian Church. derson, assistant minister of the
All three lectures in the series First Presbyterian Church, and
as well as informal suppers which Prof. Howard Y. McClusky of the
will be served at 5:30 p.ni. in the psychology department.

TICKETS ARE
NOW ON SALE!
ON THE DIAGONAL
Th e All- Cam~upu4

So when a call was issued on
campus for the Union Opera, Ley-
shon was one of the most en-
thusiastic responders.
AS GENERAL MANAGER of
the Opera, he attended scores of
committee meetings, assisted on
the directing, ordered costumes,
started the music and script writ-
ers working, and handled the bud-
get.
Casting men as women was
one of the biggest problems Ley-
shon recalled because "we had
some awfully big boys."
"One bruiser rehearsed as a
chorine until the costumes were
ordered-then we found out he
wore a size 13 shoe."
* * *
"BUT I THINK I was one of the
luckier members of the cast-I
was able to see the opera all three
times and I enjoyed it more each
night."

I=

SENIOR

-Daily-Don Howe
OPERA MAN-Dave Leyshon, general manager of the Union'
Opera's production "Froggy Bottom," looks over pictures of the
cast. Dave, long a musical comedy fan, declares that he liked
"Froggy Bottom" better than "Oklahoma."
* * * *

PREPARE NOW o C G"
We have'em... The essentials
of your courses highlighted
and packed into a nutshell,
for quick thorough review!
Ask to see the famous

SWING-OUT
presented by
The Class of 1949
SEMI-FORMAL
MAY 21,'49
I.M. BUILDING

r -t

e s
W.G.
WA DE
SHOWS
presented by
EAST ANN ARBOR'S BUSINESS MEN'S ASSN. .M-'

----,1

VA

AUTO
RACES
"Hot Rods"

i
s
t

A senior in the engineering,
college, Leyshon describes him-
self as "not an activities man."
"Froggy Bottom" has taken up
so much of his time however,
that he hasn't been able to ful-
fill his chief ambition-to be a
,member of the Thank God it's
Friday Club.
Leyshon says that his excur-
sions into the theatre are "strictly
limited to the Union Opera, and
that he plans to be a chemical
engineer. Most of his non-slide
rule courses have been in business,
but his favorite subjects are "real

dry things like physical chemis-
try."
* * *
DURING REHEARSALS of the
show, his wife (since December)
dubbed herself a "Froggy Bottom
widow."
Leyshon is now trying to rem-
edy this situation by organizing
a permanent Union Opera Com-
pany-"a take-off on the Met-
ropolitan," he says-so that next
year's production won't have to
be a one-man job.
"I'll be around in the fall to
supervise though," he declared.

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
May Comes in With a Bang
On American College Scene

ra

7 Big
100 Laps
20 Lap

Events
of Racing
Feature

ON STAGE! ON STAGE!
Boy MEETS RL
SEX-SATIONAL! REAL LIFE!
See hard-hitting DAN DWORSKY as a Lover
60c, 90c, and $1.10
May 13,8 P.M. and May 15, 7:30 P.M.
Tickets at League and Union 2 hours of hilarious laughter
BENEFIT FRESH AIR CAMP

5- DAYS STARTING - 5
TUESDAY - MAY 10TH
THRILLING FASCINATING ENTERTAINING
RIDES GAMES SHOWS
FREE PARKILG ENTRANCE ON PLATT ROAD
SPECIAL GREYHOUND SHUTTLE BUSES
HOPS HAVEN DRIVING RANGE
WASHTENAW RD.
-U.S. 23
LAST EXHIBITION SAT. N I TE, MAY 14TH

Sunday, May 8
FREE Souvenir For
All Mothers
Gen. Adm. $1.25
(Tax Inc.)
Children over ten ... 50c

Time Trials.. 1 :001
First Race ... 2:301

P.M.
P.M.

YpsI
£1!5pee/ay
3 Miles South of Ypsi

By DAVE THOMAS
While May Day was being zeal-
ously celebrated by the Commu-
nist faithful from Moscow to Tok-
yo, American college students did
some celebrating of their own last
week.
If their welcome to the month
of flowers and maypoles was not
as spectacular as Marshal Stalin's
Red Square shindig, it was none
the less enthusiastic.
CORNELL STUDENTS com-
plained loudly about an impromp-
tu early morning concert on the
library chimes which rudely jarred
the campus out of peaceful slum-
bers on Monday morning.
College authorities are still un-
certain as to who was respon-
sible, and a pair of black and
red flags found fluttering from
the tower apparently shed no
light on the situation.
The Harvard Crimson professed
to see a subversive side to the an-
nual Wellesley hoop race.
* * *
THE WINNER, who is traditi-
onally supposed to be the first of
her class to marry, unhappily de-
clared that she didn't want to
marry after all and an unauthor-
ized male entrant finished out of
the money.
After the early morning fes-

tivities the hoopsters heard an
address on "woman's role in this
revolution."
Freedom of the press was threat-
ened at the University of Pitts-
burgh where roving groups of fra-
ternity men confiscated 1100 cop-
ies of an election issue of the stu-
dent paper because of misappre-
hensions concerning a forthcom-
ing article.
* * *
IT WAS ALMOST noon before
they discovered that the article
they sought was not in that day's
issue.
Gala week-end activities were
scheduled this week-end at five
Big Ten universities. Indiana,
Purdue, Illinois, Minnesota and
Ohio State, were busily prepar-
ing parade floats and dance dec-
orations and throwing out the
welcome mat for alumni.
Prospective May Day queens had
a tough time of it at Ohio State
were a caravan of open cars car-
rying the gorgeously adorned can-
didates on a campaign tour were
doused with torrents of water from
the fourth floors of a men's dorm.
May had its darker note, too.
In East Lansing, unwary Spar-
tans were lining up at the health
service for poison ivy treatment.
The banks of the Red Cedar are
flourishing with the stuff.

:., :"

.mm .* .'. E

tif.":Vi..:"...i'J:.":1:wYi'w"S.!. «1!L 'w'i!. '':'+t'

LI

I

Every Day Is Day
In Our Downstairs Cotton Shop

, :3
) "! _t
:i .. . ," ..
::.
x . , '
: ,
--
. ,:_ ,
:
,,
.,
/ . .
; ' 1 %
ZS
} ,
., r
t
/F . v
7. ?.> r
..
,,.
:' >.
:, , :;
r ; > ;:
'' :">,<.: .
. ;
.
f /
/
F ' ;,y

i

lead the ,6pfhIt tte pade
in up Cottenh dp'44e
Our suds-loving cottons suit any mood
-we have ruffle and lace-bedecked dresses
for those. "dress-up" dates, we have well-
cut, easy-to-slip-into sunbacks with match-
ing jackets, and practical but sleek looking
sports dresses-which double for school as

Vaga

~f f
j '.y,. '/
,'
--~

sul
You'll n
each da
differen
S. . or
be meet
size, ag
be no n
you see
Our
Sh
eCc
9Lu
* Sp
*1Pic)

fltil stpoin

mer should come all of a sudden .

7

0 .

eed a fresh, crisp cotton for
y of your busy life .. .
t styles, fabrics, and colors
the different occasions you'll
ing . . . regardless of
e or taste . . . there will
eed to look further when
Field of Cotton!
eers
iambrays

\. . .:
'

)rdes
nens
mina

N'_
7,'
r 'I
<I
". '1.

well as play.

All delightful materials from

PLATFORM
OXFORD

which to choose -seersucker,

chambray,

5.95

linen, shantung, broadcloth, waffle pique,
and gingham.
A .d ~ ~4

un

Rayon

THE WASHABLE CASUALS

Never know where summer will take
you-and here's the shoe to go places.
The cork platform and wedge heel,
soled with rubber gives you the
softest, lightest walking ever.
In slecio ofhdsome ., colors

descents

-o lay .'

0

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan