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May 07, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

M!!

PATIENCE' BLOOMS:
Mysterious New Plant
Puzzles DiagStrollers

By PAUL BRENTLINGER
Is it a creature from Mars?
Is it a glamourized sun lamp?
These are some of the questions
that ran through the minds of
diag strollers as they tried to iden-
ASCE Holds
Annual Spring
Picnic Today
Michigan's student chapter of
the American Society of Civil En-
gineers will hold its annual spring
picnic today.
As last year the site of the get-
together will be the farm of Prof.
William Housel, of the Civil En-
gineering staff.
The faculty-student softball
game has been scheduled as the
feature of the afternoon.
Those who plan to go may sign
Up on the board outside Rm. 307
West Engineering Building and be
on hand at 1 p.m. tomorrow when
the group leaves from the parking
lot at the south end of the West
Engine Annex.
Ticket Discount
Engineers will get a 25 cent re-
duction on Senior Ball tickets by
presenting stub "B" of their ac-
tivities cards at the time of pur-
chase, Bill Gripman, president of
the Engineering Council an-
nounced. Tickets for the ball are
now on sale at the administration
building.

tify the strange green and yellow
creation that sprang forth in the,
center of the campus yesterday'
morning.
DILIGENT RESEARCH finally
revealed that the questionable ob-
ject is merely a giant lily, which
is supposed to represent the lily
carried by poet Reginald Bun-
thorne, leading character in the
Gilbert and Sullivan operetta "Pa-
tience."
"Patience," as produced by
the University's Gilbert and Sul-
livan Society, will open next
Thursday night at Pattengill
Auditorium for a three-day stay.
The lily truly plays a momen-
tous role in "Patience." Bunthorne,
an aesthetic poet of the first or-
der, spurns the love of twenty
rapturous maidens, and finds so-
lace in a lily.
DURING THE course of the
plot, Bunthorne succumbs to the
charms of one of the ladies. How-
ever, as the last curtain falls,
the young lady leaves poet Bun-
thorne for a military man, leaving
him with only his lily for comfort
and company.
"Patience" is being directed
by Tom Wilson, who wielded the
baton for Union Opera's recent
production of "Froggy Bottom."
Carol Neilson, Jim Ueberhorst,
and Jimmie Lobaugh have leading
roles in this fourth offering of
the local Gilbert and Sullivan
group.
Tickets for "Patience" are on
sale daily in the Administration
Building lobby.

SL Analysis
Shows Bloc
Voting Less
Bloc voting seems to be on the
way out.
This was the opinion of stu-
dent legislator Duane Nuechter-
lein, '50BAd, in an analysis of the
recent Student Legislature elec-
tions made at an SL meeting.
Nuechterlein told The Daily that
bloc voting is not as apparent as
it has been in previous elections,
and more candidates were -elected
by persons who knew them per-
sonally, not because they were
told to vote for certain candidates.
* * *
CANDIDATES who received the
largest number of votes and were
elected early in the vote count
were not those who got in by
the blocs, Nuechterlein said.
"I believe that Panhellenic
Association and its president,
Mary Stierer, should get a lot
of the credit for discouraging
bloc voting by promoting open
house in sororities, fraternities
and other groups to get the vot-
ers acquainted with the candi-
dates," he said.
This eliminated much of the
blocs and gave voters a chance
to vote for themselves, and next
year we will work to eliminate
blocs completely, he added.

QUADRUPLETS BORN IN BRONX-Nurses hid two boys, while two girls lie in an incubator
following the birth of quadruplets to Mrs. Ethel Collins, 27, at Lebanon Hospital in the Bronx,
New York. Three extra nurses were hired to watch the babies around the clock and an extra
receptionist was on hand to help handle the crowd clamoring to see the children. The father,
a $72-a-week clerk in a brokerage firm, hired an attorney to take care of the flood of offers
for the quads which ranged from a furnished home to a television contract. Hospital officials
reported that all were doing well, but the babies and the Collins' other child were taking it most
calmly.
- i

Dorms Take Fire Precautions

Intensified fire precautions are
being taken in all women's resi-
dences thisfsemester,hgradually
ending in fire -drills held in all
women's dormitories, sororities,
league houses and cooperatives.
Although they are checked each
year by fire precaution experts,
the offices of the Dean of Women
has sent out cards to every wom-
en's residence asking if they de-
sire additional advice from fire
experts.

Of the 40 cards which have been
returned, only three houses have
indicated that they desire fur-
ther assistance.
In addition, meetings have been
held between house mothers and
house presidents to discuss pre-
caution measures. In most cases,
one student has been placed in
charge of the program and is re-
sponsible for organizing fire drills
and other precautions.

L

DORM NEWS
(Contributors to What's Up in the
Dorms column should hereafter con-
tact Janet Watts at The Daily or 567
Jordon.)
Spring elections and formal
dances have been two of the most
important topics of dormitory con-
versation lately.
Ande Riddell was elected presi-
dent at the recent Martha Cook
elections. Other officers selected
at the same time are Adele Hager,
vice president and social chair-
man; Diane Constand, secretary;
Tal Hoyt, treasurer; and Marian
Hardy and Donna Billington, sen-
ior and junior representatives to
the house board.
* * *
THE VIGOROUS campaigning
before the election was climaxed
with an election night parade
down the fourth floor corridor to
the front door.
Tyler House held its house
elections Thursday night with 89
per cent of the house residents
voting. Al Atwood was named
president with Alex McKeen se-
lected as East Quad representa-
tive.

By Robert Starling

7Te

USIC

CE

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Jordan
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Hall's elections are
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House residents will elect a presi-
dent and social chairman for the
1949-50 school year.
* * *
VOTING in Vaughan House re-
sulted in the ratification of a house
constitution drawn up by Dick
Aronson. The new rules were ac-
cepted by 124 men with 33 op-
posed,
Vaughan House's spring for-
mal will be held Saturday, May
21, with Mac Ferguson's orches-
tra supplying the music.

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