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May 05, 1949 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4
THU SDAY, MAY 5, 1949

EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY,

EIGHT TJIU*RDAY, MAY ~ I94~

HOT KEYBOARD MAN:
Art Hodes To Be Featured
At Dixie Jazz Concert

Art Hodes, one of the greatest
exponents of the keyboard, will be
the featured soloist at an all-
Dixieland Jazz Concert to be pre-
sented May 15 by the Hot Record
Society.
Born in Chicago, Hodes grew up
in the late 20's, the golden era of
Dixieland jazz. Shortly after his
arrival in New York, he became
the center of a Dixieland jazz cult
there.
* * -
ONE OF THE MOST articulate
of iqzz artists, Hodes had his own
radio program over New York's
W±i C froim 1942 to 1943 and edit-
ed The Jazz Record from 1943 to
1947.
The jazz man has played with
Bix Beiderbecke, Frank Tesche-
macher and Louis Armstrong.
He has, however, remained a
small band musician, resisting
the temptations of bigger out-
fits throughout the country.
Reputed to have one of the best'
left hands in the United States,
Hodes will bring to Michigan one
of its first all-Dixieland Jazz Con-'
certs.
* * s
..FEATURED WITH -, him as
members of the "All Stars" are

"Wild Bill" Davison, trumpet; Pee
Wee Russell, clarinet; Brad Gow-
ans, trombone; Herb Ward, bass
and Tony Sbarbaro, drums.
Brownie McGhee, famed ballad
singer, will also appear with the
band.
Help Needed
For SL_ Book.
An appeal for student help in
preparing a booklet which will de-
scribe the functions of all campus
organizations was made yesterday
by Jim Storrie '5OBAd, editor of
the proposed handbook.
According to Storrie, a Student
Legislature member, the new pub-
lication has- been designed prima-
rily for freshmen. All students will
find it useful, however, he noted.
Students interested in working
on the handbook may contact
Storrie at 407 Chicago House or
by calling 2-4401.
.All campus organizations who
have received SL questionnaires
are requested to turn them in to
the Student Affairs Office as soon
as possible.

-Daily-Bill Ohlinger
UIG FOUR-These four students were elected officers of the Stu-
dent Religious Association at a recent meeting of the electorate.
They are top left, Al Wildman, president; top right, Gordon Mills,
vice-president; bottom left, Janet Watts, representative-at-Large;
and bottom right, Joyce Simon, secretary.
'U' WAR MEMORIAL:
Complete Phoenix Plans
To Be Revealed Tuesday

DORM NEWS1
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Contributors to
W~hat's Up in the Dorms should con-
tact Dolores Ialaner at The Daily or
105 Betsy Barbour.)
House elections for president
and social chairman of Jordan
Hall will be held next Wednesday.
Women who wish to run for office
must be either juniors or seniors
and must submit their petitions
tomorrow.
Jordan Hall will have its annual
faculty dinner next Thursday with
35 faculty members and their wives
attending. Social chairman Millie
Fox is in charge of the event.
* * *
GUESTS AT Helen Newberry
Residence Hall's recent honors
dinner were Mrs. Mary Bromage,
associate dean of women, and Mrs.
Elsie R. Fuller, assistant to the
dean of women.
New officers for next year
were recently elected at Helen
Newberry. They have already re-
lieved this year's officers so they
can start in next fall with some
experience.
The new officers are Sue Siris,
president; Rita Woodson, vice-
president; Sue Peterson, secretary;
Phyllis Walters, treasurer; Cath-
erine Clairmont, social chairman;
Lita Hagen, activities; Barbara
Trytten, decorations; Ruth Cohen,
drives; Doroty Rupp, athletics;
and Jurata Guisartis, librarian.
NEW OFFICERS for next year
at Betsy Barbour are Jan Elling-
hausen, president; Audrey Benner,
vice-president; Ruth Spillman,
secretary; Liz Wargell, treasurer;
Lois Comb, social chairman.
Betsy Barbour's spring formal
will be held from 9 p.m. to mid-
night Saturday, May 14, with
Del Elliot's orchettra.
On Sunday, May 15, Betsy Bar-
bour will have an "Open-Open"
house when parents and men and
women guests may inspect the
rooms on all floors.
* * *
APPROXIMATELY 89% of the
residents at Vaughan House voted
Monday on the ratification of a
house constitution. House mem-
bers voted on printed ballots in
regular voting booths.

REVIVE SCHOOL SPIRIT:
New Committee Plans Fall Pep Rallies

Sparking a revived school spirit.
three pep rallies featuring na-
tionally-known speakershand spe-
cial dances afterwards have been
slated for next fall by a newly-
formed All-Campus Pep Rally
Committee.
The committee, composed of
representatives of the Wolverine
Club, Union, League, IFC, AIM.
Panhel and Assembly, has planned
super rallies for the Army, Minne-
sota and Ohio State games.
* * *
AN INFORMAL street dance
has been drawn up to follow the
Army game rally on October 7.
The double street in front of the
League has been tentatively slated
as the site of the affair.
Homecoming and Minnesota

game rally will coincide October
21, so the Committee hasn't
planned a dance after the rally.
But it is working on plans to
drape State St. with homecom-
ing banners and smother it in
Maize and Blue.
An informal come-as-you're-
dressed dance at the Union will
follow the Ohio State game rally,
the season's last, on November 18.1
* * *
AS IN PAST years, the rallies'
will be held on South Ferry Field
under the light of a skyscraper
bonfire and a corps of torchbear-
ers.
But this year things will be a
little different, Stu Hertzberg,
'50, Wolverine club member and
chairman of the Rally commit-
tee, promised. Instead of begin-
ning in front of the Union, the

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By JIM BROWN
"Giving birth to a new enlight-
enment, a conversion of ashes into
life and beauty."
With these words from the Uni-
versity War Memorial Committee's
resolution to the Board of Regents,
the Phoenix Project was launched
on May 17, 1948.
* * *
PLANS FOR the entire scope of
the Project will be revealed for the
first time Tuesday in a public
meeting in Rackham Lecture Hall.
Designed to be a "living, time-
less, creative force for peace,"
the Project is to be devoted to
exploiting the peaceful and hu-
manitarian applications of
atomic energy.
The concept of a functional War
Memorial originated on Dec. 18,
1946, when the Student Legislature
went on record as approving such
a set-up and laid tentative plans
for a fund-raising campaign.
OFFICIAL sanction came when
the Board of Regents named a
faculty-student War Memorial
Committee in September, 1947.
The idea for an atomic re-
search center first caught fire
in the mind of Fred J. Smith,
prominent New York publisher
and one-time University student.
He suggested a vast project de-
signed to make atomic energy
the slave rather than the mas-
ter of mankind, as a fitting trib-
ute to the University's war dead.
Enthusiastically accepting
Smith's plans after rejecting
scores of other proposals as un-
suitable, the committee immedi-
ately sent to work cracking the
shroud of security which sur-
rounded all matters dealing with
atomic energy in America.
* * *

rallies will begin at the dorms,
fraternities and sororities.
There, to the martial music of
fraternity bands, spirited students
will tramp to the Union and form
a victory- hungry mob. From there
it will march to South Ferry Field.
HELPING THE fraternity bands
will be half of the University
Marching Band, which will play at
each rally.
There will be talks by nation-
ally-known speakers as well as
local heroes, Hertzberg said. The
committee is hoping to have
sports announcer Bill Stern
spark one rally.
Carloads of football-sh aped
maize and blue pins bearing some
sort of victory-for-Michigan mes-
sage will add color to the affair,
he added.
-- j

Plan To Elect
Superintendent,
Turned Down
LANSING - (lP)-A long advo-
cated proposal to make the state
superintendent of public instruc-
tion an appointive instead of an
elective official was defeated in
the Senate yesterday.
A proposed constitutional
amendment, drafted by the cit-
izens education study commission,
was defeated 17 to 14. Such a
measure requires a two thirds
vote.
THE LEGISLATION would have
increased the state board of edu-
cation from three to six members,
keep them as elective officials and
allow them to appoint the state
superintendent.
Senator James T. Milliken
(rep., Traverse City) failed in
his attempt to override the com-
mittee amendments which would
have retained the elective status
of the board.
Senator Harry F. Hittle (Rep.,
East Lansing) charged that an
appointive board of education
would create a system where the
superintendent of public instruc-
tion would function purely at the
will of educators.

'9O

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Erich Walter, Dean Ralph Sawyer
and Dr. Fred Hodges appeared be-
fore the Atomic Energy Commis-
sion in Washington, D.C. to ex-
plain the proposed peacetime
atomic research center.
They emerged from the his-
toric meeting with the solid
backing 'of the Commission
which applauded the move.
After receiving the endorsement
of the Office of Naval Research,
the Project was taken to the Uni-
versity Board of Regents where it
received approval on May 1, 1948.
* * *
ON MAY 17 the Phoenix was
revealed to the public for the first
time in a special edition of The
Daily.

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