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May 05, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Smoke, Gas
Trap Four
In Coal Fire
Rescuers Work
To Free Miners
GIRARDVILLE, Pa.-(IP)-Four
miners were trapped 800 feet un-
derground yesterday in a burning
anthracite mine. Rescuers pumped
fresh air in hopes the entombed
men are still alive.
The miners were trapped short-
ly before last midnight in the No.
5 Colliery of the Gilberton Coal
Company, two miles from this
eastern Pennsylvania hard coal
community.
NOT A SOUND or sign has come
from them. Fire cut off the mine's
communications system. Voices
don't carry beyond the first level,
300 feetrbelow the surface.
Several rescue workers, wear-
ing asbestos suits and gas
masks, went down the smoking
shaft. They reached 500 feet but
smoke forced them back.
The 1,100-foot deep shaft, em-
ploying 400 men in two shifts, is
nestled in a tiny valley boxed in
by hills.
* * *
FIRE BROKE out while only the
small night force of eight men
was underground. Four miners,
partially overcome by smoke and
gas, reached the surface safely.
But four were trapped as dense
smoke collected in the damp, dark
tunnels.
"We hope the men are still
alive," a, company spokesman
said.
So did relatives and friends hud-
dling nearby, intently watching
the quietly efficient work of res-
cuers.
OFFICIALS reported the fire
halted operation of all water
pumps. This raised the fear the
entombed men may drown in the
rising waters.
Co-op League
To Meet ere
May . to 1.5
Jerry Voorhis, former Congress-
man from California and execu-
tive secretary of the Cooperative
League, will be one of the main
speakers at the spring conven-
tion of the Midwestern Confer-
ence of Campus Co-ops, May 13
.to May 15, here.
Voorhis will speak on "The Pro-
gress of American Cooperatives."
VICTOR REUTHER, education-
al director of the CIO, will talk
on "Unions and Cooperatives."
Deans Bromage, Lloyd and
Walter are expected to partici-
pate in one of the meetings on
the subject of "University Rela-
tions with Cooperatives."
In addition, there will be pan-
els on "Group Dynamics" and
"Consumer and Student Co-op
Relations."
* * *
VOORHIS' LAST visit to Ann
Arbor took place one year ago
when he addressed business ad-
ministration students at the Uni-
versity.

-Daily-Hank Tyson
NEW ARRIVALS-Twenty Siamese students, just arrived at the
University, are welcomed by Dr. Esson M. Gale, director of the
International Center. The eight women and twelve men are here
for an eight weeks' "American orientation" program. Upon com-
pletion of the course, they will attend colleges and universities
throughout the country for graduate work in education.
'U'-SPONSORED:
Adult Education Meet
To Be Held Next Week

World War II veterans main-
taining G.I. Insurance must be
cautious in their use of the 31-
day grace period allowed for
premium payments, the VA ad-
vised.
If a veteran finds it inconven-
ient to pay his insurance prem-
ium when it is due the first of
every month, he has this month's
time in which to keep his insur-
ance from lapsing.
* * *
BUT BY DOING so, he runs an
extra risk that his policy will lapse
because of a few days' forgetful-
ness, VA warned.
This grace period is intended to
protect veterans' insurance poli-
cies in emergencies, and should
not be used regularly, VA said.
THE VA CANNOT pay for out-
patient medical treatment by pri-
vate physicians unless the injury
or illness is service-connected and
then only if prior authorization is
obtained from VA.
Veterans should contact VA
personally or have their doctors
get permission from the chief
medical officer of the appropri-
ate VA regional office before
beginning treatment.
Application for authorization
should include the veteran's claim
number and the nature of the dis-
ability for which treatment is
needed.
Prior authorization is not re-
quired in cases of emergency, but
the treatment must be reported
to VA within 15 days to assure
payment.

, ,

Top honors and awards have
been made to five University fac-
ulty members.
Prof. Ross Lee Finney of the
School of Music will have his
composition, Fourth String Quar-
tet, published by the Society for
the Publication of American Music
this year.
* * *
TWO PROFESSORS have been
elected to membership in national
organizations. They are Prof.
Shirley W. Allen, of the forestry
department, to the National Rec-
reation Policies Commission, and
Dr. Howard B. Lewis, head of
the Biological Chemistry depart-
-s

ment of the Medical School, to the
National Academy of Sciences.

In
have
their

addition, two professors
been elected presidents of
respective organizations.

They are Prof. Harold M. Dorr,
of the political science depart-
ment, to head the Midwest Con-
ference of Political Science, and
Dr. Thomas Francis, Jr., chair-
man of the department of epi-
demiology in the School of Public
Health, to president of the Amer-
ican Association of Immunologists.
- - - - - -

University Faculty Members
Receive Top Honors, Awards

VET'S
WATCH REPAIR
Save yourself a bad time
by having correct time
Blue Front - State & Packard
West Lodge PX -- Willow Lodge
Community Drugs-E. Ann Arbor

TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of oil makes
Sold,
Bought,
Rep aired,
Rented
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
G. 1. Requisitions Accepted.
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St.

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Acting on the premise that edu-
cation doesn't stop upon gradua-
tion from college, the University
will again sponsor the Adult Edu-
cation Institute, and Alumni Uni-
versity.
More than a thousand Michigan
LSA Officials
Change Offices
Deans Occupy Suite
Vacated by Ruthven
Several Literary College offi-
cials have recently had their of-
fices changed.
As a result of the increased of-
fice space made available by the
new Administration Building, sev-
eral of the offices on the first floor
of Angell Hall had been left va-
cant.
* * *
DEAN HAYWARD Keniston and
Associate Dean L. S. Woodburne
are now in President Ruthven's
old office, Rm. 1210 Angell Hall.
Because of alterations which
are now in progress, Assistant
Dean C. H. Peake and the aca-
demic advisers will not be able
to occupy their new offices until
the summer session.
At that time, Dean Peake, who
is now in Rm. 1220 will occupy
Rm. 1010; Upper-class Advisers,
now in Rm. 1204 will be moved to
Rm. 1004; and the Freshmen and
Sophomore Academic Counselors
will move from Rm. 107 Mason
Hall to their new Angell Hall of-
fices in Rm. 1210.
Astronomy Trip
Drs. Keith Pierce and John
Brody of the astronomy depart-
ment will head an expedition leav-
ing today for Mount Wilson, Cal-
ifornia to study the sun's infra-
red rays.
Members of the expedition will
install a solar infra-red spectro-
meter in the Mount Wilson Ob-
servatory, Prof. Leo Goldberg of
the astronomy department said.
The spectrometer is a duplicate
of the one built by the University
at Lake Angeles.

clubwomen will journey to Ann
Arbor, May 10-12 to attend the
17th annual Adult Education In-
stitute.
CURRENT ADVANCES in sci-
ence, medicine, politics and fine
arts will be presented to the "stu-
dents" in lectures and demonstra-
tions. Classes will also be held in
parliamentary law.
Featured speakers of the In-
stitute will be Prof. William
Haber, who spent the last year
advising Gen. Clay on the dis-
placed persons problem, and
Prof. James K. Pollock, member
of the Hoover Commission on
reorganization of the Federal
government.
Alumni University, June 13-18,
will be revived this year after a
lapse occasioned by the war. It
is under the guidance of the Uni-
versity's Bureau of Alumni Rela-
tions and Extension Service.
PURPOSE OF THE program is
to bring University alumni up to
date on contemporary American
problems. Four lectures to be held
daily, plus recommended reading
make up the bulk of the program.
"While the Alumni University
is designed primarily for Univer-
sity graduates, the program will
be open to the graduates of any
college or university," Wilfred B.
Shaw, director of alumni rela-
tions, said.
Murder Drama
To Be Presented
Students of the radio division of
the speech department will pre-
sent an original drama by Lee H.
Wilson, 'Murder on Vacation" on
the Angell Hall Playhouse at 10
p.m. today, over station WHRV.
Merril McClatchey will head the
cast as Steve Badger, who finds ex-
citement and danger in a case of
mistaken identity.
Included in the cast are Joyce
Cregor, Joe Walsh, Ed Potts, Al
Samborn and James Reiss. Rich-
ard Charlton will direct the pro-
duction.

SUMMER SLACKS
in SHARKSKIN
$650
Blues, Tans, Greens, Greys
SPORT SHIRTS
to harmonize

$550

Made of WESTERN SADDLE LEATHER ...
all hand leather laced with rich, tough RAWHIDE
colors - natural or oxblood
WANTY & REULE
210 South Main Street

$40°

Greys, Tans, Greens

KuOHN'eS
122 E. Liberty - On the Corner

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OVER 100 YEARS AT MICHIGAN
Hlaspel
YOUR BUAIAITEE Of
THE iiNSIt STAIA INS
EIMSSA U SMMf a tIOTES
The Sign of the Smartest
Warm Weather Clothes on the Campus

Read What Louis Armstrong Says
About Our Concert May 15:
Dear Fans: May 2, 1949
Well, Well, Well look who's coming to town . . . Why folks,
this bunch of musicians are some of the hottest cats that ever picked
up an instrument to blow . .. Idpersonally know, because I've played
with all of these boys . . . And as serious as I am about my horn,
you know I wouldn't be just saying this to be fancy.
There is Art, Wild Bill, Pee Wee, Brad, Ward, Sharbaro. They'll
just about "Gass Ya" no end . . . Take it from O' Satchmo, Dig'em
Gates, Dig'em
Red beans and ricely yours,
LOUIS ARMSTRONG
DIXIELAND
JAZZ CONCERT
PRESENTED BY
The U. of M. Hot Record Society
featuring
ART HODES ALL-STARS
with
WILD BILL DAVISON, ART HODES, Piano
Trumpet HERB WARD, Bass
PEE WEE RUSSELL, Clarinet TONY SBARBARO, Drums
BRAD GOWANS, Trombone
Plus BROWNIE McGHEE, Folk Ballad Singer
Sunday, May 15, Hill Auditorium, 8 P.M.
Tickets $1.50, $1.20, 90c
Advance Sale, May 1-9, General Sale, May 7-15
All Seats Reserved

of You

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------------------------ --------------
(Use this convenient order blank for ordering concert tickets)
ADVANCE SALE FOR ONE WEEK ONLY
J Make checks payable to
HOT RECORD SOCIETY Mail Orders Not
J % Dean'Rea Accepted After
1020 Administration Bldg. Monday, May 9, Midnight
Ann Arbor, Mich.
J Enclosed find a check or money order for $ ............I
I for tickets to the Dixieland Jazz Concert, Sunday, May 15, at J
8 p.m. Number and section as indicated below.
Main Floor $1.50........
1 (If the choice of tickets as indi-

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The better formal jacket of unquestioned
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