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May 04, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH.EMICIHIGAN DXILYWEDNESDAY, TAY 4,1Mg-

'

Fresh

Air

Camp- a

hichigan

Tradition

ROBIN HOOD-A cabin counselor introduces three of his charges to the technique of stringing a
bow. There are eight boys and one counselor to a cabin. Because the Fresh Air Camp is a diagnos-
tic and therapeutic camp, the counselors duties go far beyond the usual concept of a camp coun-
selor. These counselors must arrange a program designed toward correcting the particular behav-
ioral problems exhibited by his cabin members. He also unobtrusively compiles a behavior and ad-
justment record which is returned to the social agency which sent the boy to the camp.

Hold Annual Tag
Day DriveToday
Jingling dimes, quarters and dollars will bring a four week
summer camping experience for 230 underprivileged boys closer to
realization today as the University Fresh Air Camp conducts its
annual Tag Day.
More than 700 volunteer students will man the contribution
buckets scattered from downtown Ann Arbor street corners to stra-
tegic campus locations.
A goal of 5,000 dollars has been set for the traditional student
project.
EVER SINCE THE FIRST two-week camping outing began
,vhat is today the University Fresh Air Camp, the undertaking has
been largely a student function. Not only have contributions from
students, faculty, alumni and friends made it possible for the camp
to continue operation through the years, but the staff has always
been composed predominantly of students.
In recent years the camp has become affiliated with the
University's Institute for Human Adjustment and the University
thus assumes part of the financial burden. Things were not
always so easy, however.
In years past, the youngsters themselves used to canvas Ann
Arbor with collection cans in order to supplement the annual Tag
Day receipts.
THIS PRACTICE is no longer followed but contributions from
students, alumni, faculty and private citizens are still expected to
provide one third of the budget.
"If the students gave this thing up it would collapse," testifies
Camp Director William C. Morse.,A
The students have become even more closely connected with the
camp in recent years as it has been thrown open for picnics and
other weekend outings.
APPROXIMATELY 40 SPECIALIZED students interested in
social work make up the counselor staff. It is their job to plan
a program for each individual camper aimed at ironing out hir
behavioral difficulties.
They also unobtrusively observe the youngster's habits and actio
and make a detailed report to the boy's social agency. Thus the
camp is an integral part of a year around corrective program for pre-
delinquent children.
The little guy on the diving board has become the symbol of thi,
unique student charity and a monument to all the faculty member.
and former students who have helped to make the University Fres2
Air Camp what it is today.

QUIET HOUR-Checkers, magazines and letter writing occupy four fresh air campers during the
afternoon rest period. This library is in the main lodge. Oampus organizations have raised 16,000
dollars which will be used to winterize this building so that it can be used for winter excursions by
University student groups. The hills surrounding the lake provide excellent skiing and tobogganing
grounds and the lake freezes over for long periods. Many students are using the camp facilities for
baseball and picnics these warm May weekends.

THE
MICHIGAN
DAILY
PICTURE
PAGE
Pictures Courtesy
of
University News Service
Edited
by
DAVE THOMAS

FOUR MEN IN A TUB-Youthful campers play in a rubber raft under the close supervision of. a'
camp counselor. Counselors are students who ar3 interested in social work and are enrolled in the
summer session. They receive sIx hours credit for their eight weeks of effort. The chain of seveni
lakes on which the camp is situated provides exce lent facilities for all types of water activities 4nd
overnight boat trips.

PROUD CAPTOR-One of the 230 Fresh Air Campers shows a
turtle which he has captured to Camp Director William C. Morse.
Turtles and snakes are favorite pets although not so popular with
the women counselors. Adult interest in even the most minor
achievement often pays big dividends on the road toward making
the boy a normal youngster.
PRESENTING
DETROIT STYLIST
Mr. Everett C. Barnes
Formerly of Charles of -the Ritz and the J. L. Hudson Co.
Specializes in haircuts, permanent wavin; to' suit the
individual need. Every Tuesday at
RUTH'S BEAUTY SHOP
215 South 5th Ave. Phone 7249 (
- c~c~c~rS P0<--> I0< <-G < ->0.cyo-yo
|| SPRING SPECIAL

MORE THAN ONE HUNDRED WINNERS:
Scholarships, Honors Awarded to Students, Faculty

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Scholarships and honors have
been granted to more than one
hundred University students and
faculty members, and to a hospi-
tal staff member.
Forty-seven engineering stu-
dents have been awarded scholar-
ships for next year. Forty-two
faculty members, graduate stu-
dents and undergraduates were in-
itiated into the newly chartered
Alpha Upsilon Chapter of Pi Sig-
ma Alpha Political Science Fra-
ternity.
THREE ENGINEERING stu-
dents, 12 physical education con-
centrates and two graduates in
the School of Public Health have
been honored in their respective
fields. A member of the University
Hospital staff also received an
award.
Dean Ivan C. Crawford of the
Engineering College announced
the names of the forty-seven en-
gineering students who have
been granted scholarships.
Juniors who received scholar-
ships are William J. Gormon, Ray-
mond W. Kaupila,. William L.
Pound, Walter R. Debler, William
J. Salot, Al. S. McLennan, Her-
man Merte, Jr., Ralph E. Hillman,
Herbert L. Munzel, Roger A.
Skykhouse, Clifford A. Dean and
Charles T. Malmstem.
ALSO ON THE list are Jerome

F. Hoheisel, David Engibous, Rob-
ert P. Robert, Earl A. Ebach,
Charles R. Walli, Ray W. Kruggel,
Kenneth H. Ristad, Gordon R.
Armstrong, Carl J. Studerus, Ken-
neth R. Greider, David S. Wise,
Theodore G. Birdsall, Emil E. Eb-
ner and Robert E. Titus.
Sophomores who earned
awards include = Kenneth R.
Waltz, Ray H. Ladendorf, Har-
old J. Boutin, Ozalle White, Jack
J. Zimmerman, Robert D.
Pierce, Kenneth R. Sivier, Rob-
ert T. Wagner and Arthur L.
Rousseau.
Other sophomores who received
scholarships are Leonard V. Cha-
bala, Edward F. Waeber, Paul A.
Fromm, George R. Smolak, Eugene
J. Lessieu, Allan H. Outes, James
W. Root and John E. Powers.
TWO FRESHMEN who received
scholarships for next year are
James R. Mellor and Theodore E.
Peterson.
Two seniors who will study
under scholarships for the fall
semester are John C. Rowley
and Otto G. Schiesswohl.
Pi Sigma Alhpa's national po-
litical science fraternity elected
Randall H. Nelson, '50, as presi-
dent, Dorothee E. Strauss, Grad,
vice-president, and Irwin Robin-
son, '50, secretary-treasurer.
initiates are Robert Cunningham,
AMONG THE chapter's new

Randall Nelson, Roberta J. Reiter,
Irwin J. Robinson, Jean Vanleeu-
wen, Arthur Braverman, William
Beaney, Betty Lou Bidwell, Henry
Bretton, Frank Ecker, Edward S.
Kozera, Robert J. Lill, Marvin
Murphy, Robert McWilliams and
Merwin C. Phelps.
Other new charter members
are Marvin Tableman, Austin
Walter, Prof. James K. Pollock,
Prof. Lionel Laing, Prof. George
A. Peek, Prof. Samuel Elders-
veld, George Meyer, Allegra W.
Pasqualetti, Carol Ann Rivkin,
Glenn Ruihley, Frederic L. Web-
ber, James Barie, Sidney Belan-
off, Edith O. Brasheres, Fran-
cis Cook, John A. Houston, Ed-
gar Lane, Theodore V. Liss, Mel-
vinsMarcus and Mae Allegra
Nelson.
The list concludes with Dorothee
E. Strauss, Hubert O. Waldby,
Pamela Wrinch, Prof. Arthur W.
Bromage, N. Marbury Efimenco,
Prof. Everett S. Brown and John
A. Perkins.
RICHARD BROAD, '49E, and
Alan McClure, '49E, have been
granted scholarships in a compe-

tition sponsored by the Society of
Naval Architects and Marine En-
gineers.
John Ifindes, '49Aero, took
first place in the Tri-University
Aeronautical Paper Competition
held in Detroit.
Phi Epsilon Kappa, professional
physical educationfraternity, has
initiated 12 members. Graduate
student initiates are Robert Baker,
Thomas Dodson, Jacob Geier, Joe
House, William Largen, Edwin
Olds and James Roberts.
JUNIORS INITIATED include
Robert Davis, Gordon Levenson,
Harold Morrill and Irving Wis-
niewski. Sophomore Harry Smale
rounds out the list.
The National Foundation for
Infantile Paralysis in New York
announced that Drs. Clarence
Poppen and John McCue, Jr.
have been awarded public health
fellowships.
Don E. Franke, chief pharma-
cist at University Hospital, has
been chosen 1949 winner of the
J. Leon Lascoff Award for out-
standing contributions to profes-
sional pharmacy.

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