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May 01, 1949 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-05-01

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PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MAY 1, 1949

Michigan Netters Blank Wisconsin, 9-0

Ulvestad Ties for Penn.
Relay Pole Vault Crown

Wolverine Victory Paves
Big Nine Crown Bid Path

I

New Sports Editors

Wolverine Sailori Sink

Irish, 11

-2,

in Dual Meet

. ----

Eight Matches Go
In Straight Sets
By JOHN BARBOUR
For the second day in a row
Wisconsin faced one of the better
Big Nine teams, and for the sec-
ond day in a row they lost-this
time to the Wolverines as they
swept doubles and singles to top
the Badgers, 9-0 yesterday on the
Ferry Field courts.
The day before the Scarlet and
White fell to Northwestern who
cleaned up everything but number
four singles and won the meet,
8-1.
HERB HENTZEN in the num-
ber one spot for the Badgers had
the spectators wondering as he
forced Andy Paton to drop the
first set 8-6. Paton came back and
took the next two, 6-2, 6-3, and
won the only match of the day
that went the full three sets.
Al Hetzeck, the sophomore
from Hamtramck who dropped.
his first match in Varsity com-
petition in the number two
singles spot for Michigan at
MSC last week, came back to
top Badger number two man
Bill Rogers, 6-1, 7-5.
* * *
WOLVERINE Fred Otto had no

trouble as he tripped up Herb
Schneider, 6-1, 6-2, and clinched
the number three singles for the
Maize and Blue.
Bill Mikulich at number four
for the Wolverines slipped over
Warren Mueller after a first
set that went 6-4 and took the
second 6-2.
Don MacKay trotted through
the number five singles and
clipped Badger Cliff Bunker, 6-2,
6-1.
GORDIE NAUGLE started slowl
against Wisconsin's Don Page but
ended up 6-3 first set and re-
peated 6-3 second set to finish
off the singles and make it 6-0
for the Wolverines.
Number one doubles looked
like it was going to be another
one like the number one singles
as Hentzen and Schneider start-
ed hot for the Scarlet and White
but Paton and Mikulich took
things in hand and won, first
set 8-6, and then worked a 6-2
second to make it 7 and none
Michigan.
Hetzeck and Otto never let Wis-
consin's Rogers and Mueller get
away from them as they took
number two doubles, 6-2, 6-3. To
make a perfect day MacKay and
Naugle teamed up to manhandle
Page and Frank Hechrodt of Wis-
consin.

By JACK BERGSTROM a
Yesterday at Whitmore Lake I
the Michigan sailors swamped
Notre Dame 11-2 in a dual re-
gatta.
The regatta was run off as a j
team affair with each school en-
tering four boats. The winner of
each race was judged by the
places taken by the four boats
entered by each school, rather
than the usual procedure of
awarding first place to the school
whcse boat crosses the finish line
first.
THE WOLVERINES got off to
a good start by winning both the
"A" and "B" divisions of the first
race. In the "A" division the Wol-
verine skippers placed second,
third, fourth, and fifth. In the
"B" divisions they finished first,
second, fourth, and eighth.
The Michigan sailors dupli-
cated their success in the sec-
ond race again sweeping both
divisions. Michigan placed first,
third, sixth, and eighth, in the
"A" division and first, third,
fifth, and seventh in the "B"
division.

The Irish spoiled the Wolverine
bid for a clean sweep by winning
the "A" division of the third. The
Notre Dame skippers took first,
third, sixth and eighth.
* * *
MICHIGAN came back to take
the "B" division. The fourth race
was Michigan all the way winning
both divisions with little diffi-
culty.
Notre Dame won the "A" di-
vision of the fifth when one of
the Michigan boats was dis-
qualified for hitting a marker.
The Wolverines took the three
remaining races to give them a
total of eleven wins out of thir-
teen races and undisputed pos-
session of the trophy which was
a gilded bucket containing twelve
quarts of "nautical Bilge."
OUTSTANDING SKIPPERS for
Michigan were Jim and Bob Jones,
who placed no lower than second
in any of the races they sailed.
Jim Crowe and Charles Burke
were the standout members of the
Notre Dame crew.

Ed Ulvestad sa lvaged;a piece of
a first place for iciayetr
day when he tied for a win in the
pole vault with five others at the
55th annual Penn Relays in Phil-
adelphia.
The six vaulters cleared 13 ft. to
share the honors and draw straws
for the traditional gold watch,
significant of a Penn Relay win.
Ulvestad won last year at 13 ft.,
8 in.
MICHIGAN'S two-mile relay
team of Jus Williams, John Lind-
quist, Herb Barten, and Bob
Thomason finished third behind
Ohio State's quartet, which was
anchored by Olympic 400-meter
champ Mal Whitfield. Ohio State's
winning time was 7:44.4.
Pennsylvania, coached by
former Wolverine mentor Ken
Doherty, placed second.
The Wolverine mile relay four-

land, Bob Serg~eson, and Art Hen-
rie sprinted to fourth plaoe in the
University mile relay finals.
* * *
MICHIGAN qualified for the
finals in the mile relay by running
to second place in the preliminar-
ies, won by Yale. However, they
beat Yale in the finals, only to
finish behind the three qualifiers
from the other preliminary heat.
New York University, Cornell,
and Seton Hall finished in that
order ahead of the Wolverines,
the same three teams who qual-
ified in a blanket heat. NYU's
winning time was a fast 3:15.6.
In Friday's sprint medley relay,
Michigan's quartet failed to place.

some

of Rod Warren, Clay Hol-

I

-Daily-Alex Lmanian
THREE SPORTS-Pres Holmes, left, and Merle Levin, right; were
appointed yesterday co-sports editors of The Michigan Daily, and
Rog Goelz, standing, was appointed associate sport editor. (See
story on Page 1).

AUTO
RACES
"Hot Rods"

Tackles Pose No Problemn
For MVichigan Grid Coaches

ELBOWING IN:
'M' Golfers Engage Spartans
At East Lansing Tomorrow

7 Big
100 Laps
20 Lap

Events
of Racing
Feature

Remeber ho
M~oer

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UMM

\l~Th v ? V%\tk%
ON ALL WILLYS-OVERLAND: MODELS !.
JEEPSl~TER

(This is the third in a series of
articles concerning the outstanding
candidates for the various positions
in regard to spring football drills.)
By PRES HOLMES
Although it seems like the Wol-
verines are up to their necks in
tackles this year, the Michigan
coaching staff still has its eyes
open looking for new and better
material.
One of the most outstanding
prospects in spring practice thus
far, Tom Johnson, will probably
see action next fall in spite of the
fact that he is headed at the
moment by four lettermen and a
very promising gridder up from
the JV squad.
AL WISTERT, captain of the
Michigan team at 33, Al Wahl,
back for two more seasons, Jim;
Atchison, and Gene Hinton, letter-
Hot Rods Set
To Roll Aga in
At Ypsi Track
The hot-rod racing season turns
into the second lap today at the
Ypsilanti Speedway.
Five new drivers, in addition to
the twelve who raced in the open-
ing day festivities last week, have
submitted entries for this week-
end's events. One ofrthem is Bob
Omer, an Ann Arbor lad.
There are several other men
working on their cars trying to get
them in shape for the races. Pro-
moter "Pinky" Davis states that
he hopes to have over 20 cars on
the track by the time the first
race is ready to start.
The first race is scheduled for
2:30 p.m., but time trials begin an
hour earlier.
After just one day of racing Al
Miller is leading in total number
of points, with Phil Gehrhart and
Marion Adams close on his heels
tied for second place honors.
Bleachers are going to be set up
for today's festivities to accommo-
date the fans. In addition the
track will be oiled to cut down on
the dust. Free parking is available.
DO YOU KNOW ... Syracuse
beat Philadelphia 5-0 in the
first indoor football game held
in Madison Square Garden in
1902.

winner on the 1945 squad, are
presently out in front of John-
son for the tackle berths.
John Hess, a converted end
from Grand Rapids who looked
very good on Don Robinson's
jayvee crew last season, could
fill one of the gaps left by grad-
nation.
Nevertheless, Johnson's physical
strength, speed, and quickness
mark him as one not to be re-
All men intending to go out
for the wrestling squad next
year are requested tomeet at
the Union at 3:00 p.m. today.
garded lightly. He will probably
be playing on the offensive Mich-
igan line because of his speed.
DICK McWILLIAMS, who was
considered a top prospect last
spring but didn't seem to mater-
ialize in the fall, still needs a
lot more aggressiveness before he
can contribute greatly to the Wol-
verine cause. He could play on
the offensive line, especially be-
cause of his tremendous size, but
he needs "fire and explosiveness,"
to use the words of line coach
Wally Weber.
About the last of the prom-
ising newcomers at the moment
is John McIntyre. A .six-foot,
190-pounder up from the fresh-
man team, McIntyre lacks speed
and polish, but he has a lot
of time to work on these defi-
ciencies and could prove val-
uable to Michigan in his junior
and senior years.
From the way things look right
now Michigan shouldn't have any
tackle problem come next fall.

Michigan State's golfers are set
to elbow their way into Big Nine
competition again tomorrow after-
noon.
The Spartans will entertain
Michigan's golf team in a match
at Walnut Hills in East Lansing,
and will be trying to achieve a
winning percentage against West-
ern Conference opponents this
season. So far MSC has lost to
Ohio State, 32-4, and has pinned
an 18-15 defeat to the record of
Wisconsin's Badgers.
* * *
FOR THE WOLVERINES it will
be an attempt to iron out tle
difficulties they have been en-
countering in early meets. In their
only conference test they were
victimized by OSU, and were none
too impressive in beating their
"cousins" from the University of
Detroit twice.
A Michigan victory is antici-
pated but the Spartans are gen-
erally pretty rough on visitors
on Walnut Hiis. The advan-
Baseball
Scores-
AMERICAN LEAGUE
New York 4, Boston 3
Philadelphia 1, Washington 0
Detroit 7, Cleveland 5
Chicago 5, St. Louis 4
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Philadelphia 12, Brooklyn 4
St. Louis 4, Chicago 3
New York 4, Boston 0
Cincinnati 2, Pittsburgh 0

tage of familiarity 'with the
home course is usually worth
four or five strokes in college
circles.
State's coach, Ben Van Alstyne,
has had his hands full with a re-
building job this spring. Four
members of last season's varsity
squad did not return and there
has been a general scramble for
positions among the current group
of linksmen.
BILL HAYNES, Jim Anderson,
and Rex Newman have been carry-
ing the Spartan load recently and
it is upon this trio that Van Al-
styneyis placinghis hopes for a
victory tomorrow.
Michigan will probably field its
usual array of swingers led by
Captain Ed Schalon and Bob Ol-
son. Their support will come from
Rog Kessler, Leo Hauser, Chuck
MacCallum, and Keith LeClair.
Sam Valuck and Pete Elliott are
the other probable starters.
DO YOU KNOW ... Bronko
Nagurski, who weighed 235
pounds, could run the hundred-
yard dash in 10 seconds flat.
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Time Trials . . 1:30 P.M.
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