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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 27, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WALL BUT MIGHTY:
Microfilm Firm Owner
Clains It's BigBusiness
4-

,..1

There's .a big business in mak-
ing tiny $lms and prints.
According to Eugene B. Powers,
owner of:Ann Arbor's unique Uni-
versity Microfilms, preservation
and distribution of all kinds of
papers and documents on a mass-
production scale has been made
possible only recently through mi-
crofilming techniques.
TIlE FIUM, which is the only
one of its kind in the country, was
the pioneer in the development of
Cubist Reflects
Ivory Tower'
Theory- --Hope
Imaginative Painting
Originated by Braque
The work of Georges Braque,
contemporary French cubist, re-
flects his strict adherence to an
"ivory tower" philosophy, accord-
ing to Henry Hope, who lectured
yesterday on the artist's develop-
mea~t.
Braque, who is extremely con-
servative politically, was responsi-
ble, along with Pablo Picasso, for
the revolutionary cubist 'shool of
painting, said Hope. "Nevertheless;,
the idea of cubism came to them
independently around 1908," he
added.
ACCORIlNG TO Hope, there is
little basis for the receft .ontro-
versy among art critics on the rel-
ative xiierito of, the works of. Pi-
casso and Braque. In his opinion,
Picasso is ,a genius, while Braque
is simply a very skillful artist.
Hope said that there was a
very close friendship between
the two men during the years
froil 1908 to 1914. But, he' ex-
plained, their, relationshi# has
become estranged in recent
years because of extreme pojiti-
cal differences.
"It is true that Braque was in-
fluenced by Picasso in nost phases
of his development," Hope admit-
ted. But the now frequently ;prac-
ticed technqiue of- painting from
imagination as originated by
Braque, . hsa...

microscopic replicas of documents
which could be stored permanetly
in archives at great savings in cost
and space.
The process, perfected in 1935,
is based on the usual techniques
of photographing subjects. But
in microfilming, the negative
and print of a full page news-
paper page is reduced to a tiny
replica measuring only an inch
wide and an inch and a half
long.
So if you want to read an 1850
edition of the New York Times,
merely get the microfilm roll for
that year, put it in the special pro-
jector and turn the crank to
change the image.
IF YOU WANT to do research
in recent doctorate dissertations,
you can get out the microfilm roll,
too. Formerly, doctorate candi-
dates were required to publish
their papers privately-a rather
expensive proposition.
Now, the graduate school ac-
cepts microfilming of papers as
a substitute. With microfilm as
cheap as three cents an image,
hard-pressed graduate students
now save up to $100 over the
old method.
During the war, Powers' organi-
zation was commissioned to make
microfilms of the valuable British
archives threatened by the blitz.
AS AN AID to the now fabulous
OSS (Office of Strategic Services),
it made a vital contribution to the
war effort.
But Powers' pet project is re-
mote from waging war. Termed
Project Books, Inc., it is a non-
profit organization devoted to
relieving the bedridden from
boredom through reading.
Through the use of a projector
newly developed by Powers and
Ann Arbor 'photography manufac-
turer Robert D. Howse, micro-
filmed books and magazines are
projected onto the ceiling above
the sick person's bed. He can read
anything he wants from Super-
man to Shelley, and he can do it
himself, because projected books
require no more than a push-but-
ton to operate.
Powers likes to emphasize this
part of the new microfilming in-
dustry. He points out that there
is not only a big business in mak-
ing microfilms-there's a big serv-
ice, too.

Players Call for
Glamazons wanted, for "Boy
Meets Girl."
This is the plea of the Univer-
sity Student Players, who will pre-
sent Sam and Bella Spewack's 3
comedy May 13 and 15 in the
Masonic Auditorium. .
In their last workout, "The
Time of Your Life," they wanted
exploding pinball machines; this
time it's girls.
The players want a small regi-
ment of tall girls not afraid to
,wear bathing suits-enough to'
string across the stage. No acting
or musical ability is required for
the role, but you must be a girl,
and more than five feet six inches,
tall, says publicity chairman, Burt4
Sapowitch, '51.
"Frankly, I don't believe there>
are any good looking girls on this
campus, but we'd still like to find
some," quipped Director Mike :
Cetta, '49.
In spite of Cetta's pessimism, t
the rest of the cast looks forward
to a mob of tall femininity, re-
ports Sapowitch.
Concerning two script writers1
who might be called illegitimate
godfathers, the satire on Holly-
wood "Boy Meets Girl" was a
Broadway hit in 1935-36. The book
for the current hit "Kiss ie Kate" }
was penned by the same authors. ;
Original music for the Student ffl
Players production has been com-
posed by Jim Doolittle, '5OSM.
Mail order blankCs are available FO, "BOY MEETS GIRL
now in the League and Union, and man, issued a plea for girl
ticket sales will commence Mon- contemplating rehearsals-
day, May 9. production to be held May

Tall Gals

-Daily-Alex Lmanian
«-Burt Sapowitch, '51, publicity chair-
is like Carolyn Terwilleger, shown coyly
for "Boy Meets Girl," Student Players
13 and 15 at the Masonic Auditorium.

Club Hears
Arguments
Of Finalists
Finalists in the annual Case
Club contests will argue a hypo-
thetical legal question at 3 p.m.
tomorrow in Rm. 100 Hutchins
Hall.
Judges for the final elimina-
tions are to hear two teams of
student lawyers present opposing
viewpoints on a Michigan income
tax law that has been especially
prepared by professors in the Law
School.
* * *
GOV. G. MENNEN WILLIAMS,
who was originally scheduled to
judge the winning team, will not
be able to attend.
Judge Frank A. Picard, of the
United States District Court in
Detroit; Justice Leland W. Carr,
of the Michigan Supreme Court;
and the Dean of the Law School,
E. Blythe Stason, will make up
the group that is to determine
the winning team.
The Case Clubs, voluntary stu-
dent organizations, hold an an-
nual elimination contest during
which prospective lawyers team up
to argue cases according to actual
courtroom technique.
AFTER A LONG series of elim-
inations held during the year,
Gordon Boozer, '50L, Bernard
Trott, '49L, John Elam, '49L, and
William Pierce remain the final
competitors for the award that
will be presented by Justice Carr
at a banquet to be held tomorrow
night at the Union.
At this time, Justice Carr will
speak after awarding the
winners prizes donated by the
Henry M. Campbell endowment.
Members of all three classes in
the Law School have participated
in the practice trials, separate
winners having already been an-
nounced for the freshman Case
Club contests. The final argu-
ments are open to the public.
VET'S
WATCH REPAIR
EXAM TIME
demands
EXACT TIME
Iue Front--Packard and State
West Lodge PX-Willow Lodge
Formal Rentals
SUMMER
White Coats and
Black Trousers
All New - All Sizes
Locally Stocked
RAO6EU LIHARRIS

Fresh Airp
Will Aid Underprivileged
Tag Day will enter its second year as a campus project next Wed-
nesday. May 4. as 750 students man buckets scattered from Huron and
Main to the Diag to collect contributions for the University Fresh Air
Camp.
The funds collected in the one-day drive will be used to help pro-
vide a summer camping experience for under-privileged boys between
the ages of eight and thirteen from southwestern Michigan.
TWO GROUPS of young campers, selected by various cooperating
social agencies, are treated to four weeks of outdoor fun at the camp,
located at Patterson Lake, 24 miles from Ann Arbor.
Here, each camper is placed in a carefully-planned program
directed by education and psychology students and faculty.
* * * *
LAST YEAR, almost 5,000 dollars were callected in the Tag Day
drive. The student committee in charge of this year's Tag Day includes
members from Assembly, Pan Hel, AIM, IFC, the League, Union d
dorm groups.
Dorothy Fogel, '50, is general chairman. Others on the committee
are Stu Hertzberg, '50, Lee Sunshine, '50, Jeanne Blinn, '49, Bruce Lock-
wood, '49E, Frank Zaglemeyer, '50, and Nancy Hess, '49.
~~tarb & im
309 SOUTH MAIN STIMET
PHONE 2-2015
Downtown Headquarters for Manhattan Shirts

NEW ARRIVALS:
Siamese Students To Study
American Education Methods

New arrivals on campus May 2
will be 20 Siamese students who
will take a special nine week Eng-
lish language and orientation
course at the University.
The 13 men and seven: women
art part of a group of 50 Siamese
teachers coming to this country
to study American educational
methods. A special contract be-
tween the University and the
Siamese government is providing
for their transportation, housing
and studies.
* ~* *
A PROGRAM including classes,
tours and cultural And social
events has been devised to -orient

c R:c0c;;t>t :;;;> <-oc;;;;;>- ;;;;;;;>c o
The.TIeosophical Society of Ann -ArborQ
Presents
COLONEL FRANK NOYES
in a Public LectureO
"REINCARNATION AND YOUR LIFE TODAY"
"MICHIGAN LEAGUE, WED., APRIL 27, 8 P.M.
Public Cordially Invitedh

",A!M

WA

Kingsford-Iron Mountain Club
Spring Dace
Fort Wayne Hotel
Cass at Temple in Detroit
Sat., April 30, 9 P.M.
Students from Kingaford,
Iron Mountain and vicinity
cordially invited.

these students to American ways.
Though they all have a basic
knowledge of English, they will
brush up at the English Language
Service of the International Cen-
ter.
In addition, they will attend
a series of eight lectures by Uni-
versity faculty members on
American history, geography,
art, architecture, music, govern--
ment and literature. Eight lec-
tures by members of the educa-
tion school are also scheduled.
Campus tours, trips to Ann Ar-
bor schools, Greenfield. Village,
the -Detroit Institute of Art and
Ford Assembly Plant will complete
the academic part of the program.
* * *
THE SOCIAL PART includes
attending the Drama Festival;
Adult Education Institute, May
Festival, World Cooperation Week
events and Alumni University.
When the course ends June
25, some of the students will re-
main for graduate work and the
rest will continue their studies
rat other American universities.
Upon completion of their stud-
ies they will return to Siam to
introduce the new methods of
teaching.
Union To Hold
Bridge Contest
Another Union-sponsored dupli-
cate bridge tournament will be
held at 7:30 p.m. today in the
Terrace Room of the Union'
Cash prizes will be awarded in
the tournament, to be staged in
three sessions.
Two University students, Don
Hartman and John Dreifus, placed
second in the ' National Intercol-
legiate Bridge tournament held in
Chicago last weekend. Thirty-two
colleges participated in the con-
test.

Appointment
Bureaus Plan
MeetingHere
The annual luncheon of the ap-
pointment bureaus of Michigan
will be held at noon Friday in the
Union Ballroom.
Highlight of the session will be
the presentation of a comprehen-
sive report prepared by the Uni-
versity Bureau of Appointments
on the teaching situation in the
state of Michigan.
INCLUDED IN the report will be
a discussion of such problems as
the supply and demand of teach-
ers in various parts of the state,
and a comparison of teachers' sal-
aries in different areas.
Guest speaker at the luncheon
will be Prentiss Brown, former
U.S. Senator and OPA chief and
presently Chairman of the
Board of Directors of Detroit
Edison, who will discuss "prob-
lems of Education."
Student and townspeople inter-
ested in attending the luncheon
may make reservations by calling
at the Bureau of Appointments
before tomorrow.
Specific Enemy
GRAND RAPIDS-The house-
wife is harried by cobwebs on the
ceilingca n usually blame a small,
dark spider called Theridion Te-
pedariorum.
GREGG COLLEGE
A School of Business--Preferred by
College Men and Women
4 MONTH
INTENSIVE COURSE
SECRETARIAL TRAINING FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS AND GRADUATES
A thorough, intensive course-starting
June, October, February. Bul-
letin A on request
SPECIAL COUNSELOR for G.I. TRAINING
Regular Day and Evening Schools
Throughout the Year. Catalog
Director, Paul M. Pair, M.A.
THE GREGG COLLEGE
37 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago 3, IM1nois

119 So. Main St.

11

Phone 6924

THERE MUST BE A REASON-
Why we get so many campus men in our store
-the Farthest from campus!
OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT!
BARGAINS ALWAYS
in the Latest-Style Merchandise
THIS WEEK'S SPECIALS
SUEDE All Wool
CORDUROYJACKETS CARDIGAN
SPORT COATS Reg. 15.95 Sport Coats
Grey MaroonO$88
Blue Rust 1898
Regularly 17.95 ODD
Now Only JACKETS SUITS
4 AGO

TRY OUR GENUINE
ITALIAN
SPAGHETTI
Served Daily and
To Take Out.
Also
0 SANDWICHES
0 FRENCH FRIES
" PLATE LUNCHES
0 FOUNTAIN
SERVICE
302 South Main
Phone 8916

O V E R

1 0 0

Y E A R S

AT M I C H I G AN

^' :.,,.

£ pass

WHITE

FORMRL

S

See aflmakes and prices in white tux coats,

You be the judge
come see our complete line of
c sLirs, nainmas,.
.> neckwear, sportshirts, handkerchiefs,
:r;c underwear and beachwear.

l

then make your choice

PALMBEACH-RU DO-HASPEL

X235°

$2950

.

HIM

me I

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