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April 24, 1949 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-04-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PRIL 24, 1949 'THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SE

FROM BEER TO PHILOSOPHY:.
The Daily Looks at 'Hat' Friedman

Graduates Can A HYPOTHETICAL QUESTION:

* * * *

By ROMA LIPSKY
Usually the journalist asks the
questions and does the interview-
ing, but this week The Daily does
a turn-about to take a profile look
,t Harriett Friedman, its Manag-
ing Editor.
(This in spite of the claim that
her profile strongly resembles
George Washington's.)
* * *
HARRIETT, known familiarly
as Hat, is the first woman to hold
the top Daily position in peace-
-ime. But filling a man's role is
nothing new to this gal, often
called the only woman who's 100
percent newspaper-man.
In addition to seven semesters
on The Daily, including a se-
mester as Editorial Director and
a year as Managing Editor, she
has been a reporter for the Chi-
cago Herald American and Ann
Arbor correspondent for the De-
troit Free Press.
But newspaper work also has
an extra-curricular side. Harriett,
who looks better in center field
than any male member of The
Daily baseball team, boasts the
'b'est south side Chicago jitterbug
ever seen and the largest capacity
for beer known to womankind."
Both talents are exhibited at Daily
parties.
SHE SAYS THE hey-day of her
activities was the two years spent
at the University of Chicago. (Vi-
tal statistics: received a scholar-
ship there at the age of 15.)
She worked on the college
newspaper and played the violin
with the University symphony
-and the instrument still gets
exercise every vacation when it
is carried home and back on the
train, despite the suspicions of
fellow passengers that the case
contains a machine-gun.
As a member of the Chicago
drama group,- her pride and joy
was playing the wife in Moliere's

trol of Student Publications and
the administration, as a repre-
sentative on all major campus
committees and as "general boss-
man" of the paper.
A strictly unscientific poll of
staff members indicated that
they think she is easy to get
along with, has a terrific sense
of humor, tends to be a per-
fectionist, is dynamic and
cheerful, and is always willing
to discuss any problem-journ-
alistic or otherwise-that may
arise.
Asked what she thought of the
paper, Harriett began modestly
by declaring that "The Daily is
the greatest college paper in the
country."
* * *
"DESPITE complaints from dif-
ferent groups, it actually serves
all groups to their best interests.
Working on The Daily has prob-
ably given me the best chance I'll
ever have to say what I think and
see it in print the way I want it,"
she says.
Harriett thinks the most im-
portant thing for anyone who
has a big responsibility on cam-
pus is not to "begin taking your-
self too seriously. You have to
be able to get out occasionally
and throw. a baseball around."
Besides philosophy, she has
taken most of her hours in Eng-
lish and political science. Her fa-
vorite courses have been with
Profs. Nelson, Frankena, Meisel,
Seager and Stevenson.
* * *
AFTER GRADUATION this
spring, Harriett will spend the
summer in Europe.
"No tours," she states, "just
bumming around for two months.
My sister and I plan to visit Paris
and London, and to make a pil-
grimage to Mt. St. Michel. I guess
Henry Adams' book had a pro-
found influence on me."
When she returns, Harriett
plans-yes, that's right-to marry
a newspaper man.
h Will Present
rlivan Operetta

Find Career
In Air Force
Graduating college seniors willl
have a chance to join a United
States Air Force officer corps, as
a result of an Air Force announce-
ment yesterday.
For college graduates interested
in flying careers the Air Force is
currently reserving a number of
places in its summer and early
fall Aviation Cadet classes, ac-
cording to Ann Arbor Recruiting
Officer Sergeant 1 cl. N. E. Boad-
way.
COLLEGE GRADUATES inter-
ested in nonflying administrative
and technical careers in the Force
may receive Reserve commissions
after six months' training at an
Air Force Officer Candidate
School, he added.
Both men and women are eli-
gible, he said. No ROTC or other
prior military service is necessary.
Further information may be ob-
tained at the Ann Arbor Recruit-
ing Service, Ann Arbor Armory.

Gov. Williams To Act as Judge
For Case Club Arguments

Governor G. Mennen Williams
will be one of the judges for the
final Case Club arguments to be
heard Wednesday at the Law
School.
A hypothetical question dealing
with Michigan income tax law is
to be argued by the student final-
ists, and awards will be presented
to the winners at the Case Club
banquet to be held that night at
the Michigan Union.
ACCOMPANYING Gov. Wil-
liams on the bench will be Judge
Frank A. Picard of the United
States District Court in Detroit,
Justice Leland W. Carr of the
Michigan Supreme Court, and Law
School Dean E. Blythe Stason.
The student lawyers who have
been selected after a long series
of eliminations held by the Case
Club each year are: Gordon
Boozer, '50L, and Bernard Trott,
'49, as one team, and John
Elam, '49L, and William Pierce,
'49L, as their opponents.

Gov. Williams will be the speak-
er at the banquet, discussing "The
Lawyer in Politics." The Henry M.
Campbell awards, income from
a $4,000 endowment, will be pre-
sented to the winners by Glenn
W. Curtis, member of a Detroit
law firm.
* * *
THE CASE CLUB contests are
voluntary and are managed by
senior students in the Law School.
This year 576 freshmen and jun-
iors participated in the arguments,
directed by W. W. Wumkes, '49L,
presiding student judge. All fresh-
men contests were judged by sen-
iors, while junior class contests
were judged by a bench of one
faculty member and two students.

Jamison Gets
Silver Degree
For Service
Charles L. Jamison, professor of
business policy in the School of
Business Administration, has been
awarded the Silver Degree of the
Distinguished Service Award of
Alpha Kappa Psi, professional in
business, in that organization's
formal initiation.
Prof. Jamison was cited for "dis-
tinguished service to Phi Chapter"
as the fraternity's deputy coun-
cilor for the past fifteen years.
Succeeding Prof. Jamison is
Douglas A. Hayes.
New initiates are: John Bod-
naruk, Melvin Brandt, Gerald
Darrow, Everett Graf, Rode Ku-
bik, William Levandoski, Robert
Marsh, M. Ross Miller, M. M.
Polakovich, Robert Polakovich,
Blair Thompson and Thomas
Welch.

a

NEWS-MINDED-Harriett "Hat" Friedman, Daily Managing Edi-
tor, is pictured at the typewriter where she has produced some of
the most colorful stories and provocative editorials to appear in
The Daily. Out of sight is a cabinet containing a hot-plate, cups,
and a constant supply of coffee, a Friedman innovation in the
Senior Editors' Office. ..

" ON ALL WILLYS-OVERLAND MODELS!.
JEEPSTER,
INCLUDING
$1 *Delivered LICNESE
OVERDRIVE

"Imaginary Invalid". She played
basketball and field hockey with
the women's teams and in spare
moments managed to get enough
solo flight hours for a student's
pilot license.
* * *
"I LOOK BACK on that period
with admiration," she declares,
"but I don't see how I did it."
With her father and 'ister
Michigan alumni and a com-
plete repertoire of yellow and
blue songs from the age of. three

on, fate had slated her for Ann
Arbor. So in the fall of 45 Har-
riett became a freshman again
-this time at Michigan.
Her Chicago training made the
first year here "a snap" she re-
ports, and also helped incline her
towards becoming what she calls
"the poorest philosophy major in
the University." Friends modify
this, however, to the "least philo-
sophical."
* * *
AS MANAGING Editor, Har-
ri off earcrac Q0 0 li ic n h fxv

TONIGHT!
Glee Club - Union League
GU L AINIT ICS
$175 in Prizes $
* 14 --- Sensational Acts --- 14
* Top Campus Talent
* Fast Moving Variety
TONIGHT Hill
April 24 Auditorium
your applause picks the winners
7:30 COME EARLY!
BOX OFFICE - OPEN 5:00 P.M.

niett serves as a lialson between
; ;>o m<;;;;;>omo<;;;;;;; o c- o<;;;;::;>The Daily and the Board in Con-
ou'll love Springfield's new -
University Higi
Wonderlight Summer Blanket - Gilbert
2/3 WOOL %/3 NYLON
IT'S 72x90 and only" STOP IN to see our Bringing a cargo of rollicking
$9.95 Featured in Decorator' and victor- Gilbert and Sullivan words and
such luscious shades as ia.pad hosa
Trinidad white, Jama- ian. plaid throws at music, "The Gondoliers" will pad-
ca pink, Antilles rose, $9.95. You'll find our
Cuban god, Hibiscus victorian plaid blank- dle into Ann Arbor for a three day
coral, Domingo biue, ets hard to resist at' stay this week.
VHavana lime, Morrq only $14.95."TeGnoirlngafv-
Cgray, and Caribbean "The Gondoliers," long a favor-
green.d Crbite with Gilbeit and Sullivan fans,
v will be presented by the students
^ Always reasonably priced at of University High School at 8:30
p.m., Thursday, Friday and Satur-
THE GAGE LINEN SHOP day.
x * * *
Open 9:30 - 5:30 11 Nickels Arcade FOR THIS OCCASION the Uni-
< versity High School Auditorium

r
s
7

'America's most distinctive five-passenger sports car
for all-season use. 'Jeep' Engine with overdrive
delivers sensational mileage.
STEVE'S BODY SHOP

stage will be transformed into a
typical Venetian scene, complete
with canals. Fine arts classes at
the high school supplied the artis-
tic talent necessary for such a
change.
The production will feature a
chorus of gondoliers and peasant
girls, as well as six principals. Odi-
na B. Olson, teacher of music at
the high school, is general mana-
ger of the production.
Tickets for the performance are
priced at $1.00.

226 Detroit St.

Phone 2-3234

Ann Arbor

II

r _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

-i V

Z)artce

t',, l/Ledj...

IA:

OS G DUATE

"OF COURSE I'LL BE YOUR BRIDESMAID"
-then I'll remove my tiny jacket and dance!

CO

, ;
9 - t

AVTIA

It's a wise woman who chooses to own one of our
new, cleverly designed "double life" formals -
For you bridesmaids to-be, they're IDEAL...
for formal dinners too . . . then whisk off the tiny
jacket or stole . . . and you'll have a perfect
formal for dancing .. .
"AIR LIGHT" marquisettes-nets-chiffons-
organdys . . . crepe-jersey, and lace dinner gowns
in sizes 9 to 15 and 10 to 38 . . . a fantasy of colors

P-04
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'I'
I
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for you . . . $16.95 to $39.95
Very . . . Very. . . Important
The jewelry you add, most certainly
should compliment your gown-
our necklaces, bracelets and earrings
are definitely "conversation pieces"
-and the prices make it very
pleasing conversation too . . .

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$1.00 to $15.00

PLUS AN IMPORTANT $4000-A-YEAR ASSIGNMENT

INTERVIEWING TEAM
COMING SOON!
Few opportunities open to college upperclassmen can
match this one! Here's a chance to get both flying and
executive experience with the world's leader in Aviation
--the U. S. Air Force.
If you can qualify, you join a select group of college
___ C- cn--- A<rnifr C oP n r.nnn-with nav.

A special interviewing team will be on campus to tell
you more about it and to give preliminary qualifying
examinations. Stop in after class and talk it over with
the pilots themselves:
If you -wish, you may sign up now and finish your,
schooling before starting your training.
HERE ARE THE REQUIREMENTS:
You must be a male citizen, between 20 and 26112 years old, phy-
camllv sounl. and have at least two years of college (or be able

At Your Finger-tips
A newly arrived selection of' elbow length
and shortie mitts . . . nylon mesh and
delicate lace in a confection of colors.
$1.50 to $3.00

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