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April 23, 1949 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-04-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

BARGAIN BINGE:
Panhellenic Rummage Sale
Donates Proceeds to Camp

Yankee spirit in many a canny
shopper will lead to the Rummage
Sale sponsored by the Panhellenic
Association from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
today at the Armory Club at 243
East Ann.
Sweaters, including cashmeres,
will be priced from $.50. Skirts
may be obtained for $1. Similarly'
phenomenal prices are listed for
everything from hats to lamps.
Men's, children's and women's
Dance GrOup

To

Perform

Miss Tosia Mundstock and her
group of six dancers will present a
modern dance program at 8 p.m.
tonight in the Dance Studio of
Barbour Gymnasium.
Edith Daniels, head of the Mod-
ern Dance Club, is extending an
invitation to all campus men and
women interested in this type of
dancing, to attend the program.
SOME OF THE dances to be
performed are: "Tango" to Fili-
berto's music; "Dance to Poetry"
by Vitold Guardian; "A Spiritual";
and "A Ritual."
A spring concert of modern
dance will be given at the De-
troit Institute of Art later in
May in which Miss Mundstock's
group will repeat some of the
dances to be performed here to-
night.
Miss Mundstock is a member of
the Dance Consultant Committee
in Detroit and responsible to a
large measure for the modern
dance activities in her community.
Michigan Dames
Will Hold Dance
Michigan Dames will hold a
combined spring dance and Monte
Carlo party at 8:30 p.m. today in
the Assembly Room of the Rack-
ham Building.
Members of the Drama Group
have written a skit which they will
present as part of the evening's
entertainment.
Dance tickets may be purchased
from Interest Group chairmen or
from Mrs. John Payne, 331 Pack-
ard. They will also be sold at the
door.

clothing will be included in the
sale.
Jewelry, furniture, knick-knacks
and bric-a-brac, will take up their
share of space. A few paltry pence
is the only requisite for an ac-
quisitive shopper. Prices have been
set with a GI allowance in mind.
Proceeds from the sale will be
donated to the University Fresh
Air Camp Fund. Panhellenic's spe-
cial project is the beach house
which will be of use not only to
campers but to University stu-
dents. So far Panhellenic has
ranked far ahead of other campus
organizations in their contribution
of $4,000.
General chairman of the sale is
Jeanne Blinn. Other coeds on the
central committee are Joyce Brisk-
man, finance; Maxine Smith, sales
and set-up; Sally Edwards, sort-
ing and tagging; and Marilyn
Matthews, publicity.
ATO WIll1 Give
'Black foot Ball'
Traditional friendly rivalry be-
tween Alpha Tau Omega's and the
Sigma Nu's will be revived as the
ATO's present their annual for-
mal, "Blackfoot Ball" from 9 to
midnight today in the League Ball-
room.
Sigma Nu has been invited as
special guest commemorating a
feud which began when both fra-
ternities were founded at Virginia
Military Institute shortly after the
Civil War. As a part of this rivalry
the Sigma Nu's wore white boots
which distinguished them from
the black-booted ATO's.
TED SMITH and his orchestra
will supply music for the event.
Flowers will be given only to the
chaperones.
Those making arrangements
for the dance are Maurice Allen,
Paul Bernas, David Hoexter,
Marwood Rupp, Michael Service,
Robert Smith and Raymond
Valley.
Decorations for the dance will
feature a mural of the black-
garbed men guarding a pot in
which the black feet are being
boiled. Illusions of a tropical night
will be fostered by palm trees and
a galaxy of stars on the walls.

Alumna Helps
India's People
To Know U.S.
By PHOEBE FELDMAN
As director of the U.S. Informa-I
tion Service Library in New Delhi,
India, University of Michigan
alumna Elizabeth Robb helps
northern India's inhabitants to a
better understanding of the Unit-
ed States.
Miss Robb. who spent 15 years
in American library work before
she got the New Delhi director-
ship, finds'that the position is an
all-inclusive one.
During March, Miss Robb and
other library officials aided a
delegation from the India Min-
istry of Information study meth-
ods of handling reference ma-
terial.
* * *
EVERY MONTH, library offi-
cials answer an average of over
100 letters asking about U.S. life.
Monthly, too, over thirty times
that number of North India res-
idents come to the library them-
selves to read American newspa-
pers and periodicals.
According to library officials,
books on U.S. forestry, medi-
cine and aeronautical engineer-
ing are the ones in biggest de-
mand.
Miss Robb, who attended three
other colleges and universities in
the U.S. besides the University,
finds that she still remains di-
rectly connected with American
higher education. Acting in con-
junction with the Indian Minis-
try of Education, she also helps
select the Indian students com-
ing to this country under the
Smith-Mundt Act to do advanced
study.
DISCUSSING a library which
the U.S. Information Service re-
cently founded outside New Delhi,
Miss Robb remarks that:
"It maintains a service sim-
ilar to the circulation by the
mobile libraries in rural areas
in America," she remarks. "Mes-
sengers with supplies of books
ride bicycles from town to town
depositing books with the heads
of each (town), who then loan
them out."
But probably one of the most
interesting parts of her job is
planning the classical record con-
certs which are held weekly in
the library.
Periodically, Miss Robb plays
some American folk and popular
music. And on the record, Milton
Berle wows 'em in New Delhi too.

The Women's Phy.ical Edtca-
Lion Department is plauniik;,
;omething brand new on canpus
a "Play Day" strictly for the en-
joyment of Michigan physical ed-I
ucation majors from here and sur-
rounding colleges.
"Play Day" will be held from
9:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. Saturday,
April 30, when, if the weather is
sunny, guests will participate in
softball, tennis, golf and archery.
Chairman of the day is Betsy
Bousfield. Her assistant Nancy
Somers, remarked, "I hope that
physical education majors will
have the opportunity to discuss
the programs offered to them at
their respective schools and that
they will enjoy meeting majors
from other schools."
* * *
MICHIGAN STATE, Michigan
State Normal, Western Michigan,
Central Michigan, Wayne Univer-
sity, Adrian College and the Uni-
versity of Toledo will all send ap-
proximately 15 women majoring"
in physical education to the Mich-+
igan "Play Day."
Registration will come first
when guests receive a name-
tag and are assigned to one of
four teams. Following this Dr.
Margaret Bell, chairman of the
Program of Physical Education
for Women, will welcome every-
one to the Michigan campus.
At 10 a.m., the four teams com-
posed of students from each of
the seven visiting schools and
Union Presents

Mi hiaIn, will match wits in the
LaIOUS spoIts planned.
LUNCIIEON will be served at
noon ni WAB when everyone will
get together for sandwiches and
salad after which they will be
entertained by the Michigan ma-
jors.
Entertainment will include a
midget comedian act, a dance
duet by Virginia Seput and
Edith Daniels, a dance number
centered around "The Dark
Town Strutter's Ball," group
singing, mixers and square
dancing.
At 1 p.m. the squars will start
again with each team taking part
in a sport which it had not par-
ticipated in previously. Everyone
will thus have the opportunity to
take part in all activities.
* * *
TEA WILL BE SERVED at 3:30,
interspersed with a general ex-
change of ideas concerning the
day and questions which may still
have gone unanswered.
Tennis Ball
There will be a meeting of
the publicity committee of
Tennis Ball at 4 p.m. Monday
in Room 3D of the Union.

Central committee members
working with Miss Botsfield and
Miss Somers include Betty Kar-
keet, invitations and registra-
tion; Virginia Seput, general
schedule organizer and Vivian
Frazier, who located officials
and equipment.
Sue Rose planned the lunch-
eon and entertainment; Marilyn
Heiman is handling the tea and
Phyllis Seput is in charge of
publicity, decorations and the de-
signing of a program.
* * *
RAIN WILL not bring a halt
to "Play Day" because the com-
mittee has spent as much time
in preparation for an alternative
indoor program which would in-
clude badminton, basketball, gym-
nastics, bowling, ping-pong, ar-
chery, golf and progressive games.
Each of the seven schools who
are attending, will bring several
faculty members who instruct
physical education. They will
spend the day watching the games
and in discussion groups.
Last year the department held
a program similar to this, but in-
vited high school students who
were interested in physical educa-
tion. This is the first time other
colleges have been invited. It i
hoped that such a plan will con-
tinue as a Michigan tradition.

'Play Day' To Benefit Women in
Physical Education Department

MARJORIE STONE
*' * * *

Betrothal Announced at Party

Q

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Stone of
Williamsburg have announced the
engagement of their daughter,
Marjorie, to Richard H. Laird; Jr.,
son of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Laird of
Shaker Heights, Ohio.
Miss Stone is a member of Delta
Delta Delta and is a graduate stu-
dent in Business Education.

Her fiance is a graduate student
in chemical engineering and is af-
filiated with Phi Gamma Delta.
Announcement of the engage-
ment was made at a surprise din-
ner party at the sorority house last
week. No definite plans have been
made for the wedding.

I

....... ......

FAMOUS FOOD

East Quaders To Host at Ball

AT A FAMOUS PLACE

East Quadders are completing
decorations for their semi-formal
ball, "An International Affair,"
which will be held from 9 p.m.
to midnight today in the dormi-
tory dining halls.
Tickets are still on sale to all
residents and can be purchased
for $3.30 from house salesmen,
whose names are posted on the
Quad bulletin boards.
The four dining halls, in keep-
ing with the international theme,
will be decorated to represent the
four corners of the world. Each
room will depict a colorful scene
from some foreign country includ-
ing Rio, Iceland, Africa and the
Orient.
* * *
DECORATORS have proved

Clean

sweep

SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE
SALE SALE
SALE SALE
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SALE SALE
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SALE SALE
SALE ofSALE
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SALE SALE
SALE SALE
LE S SALE
SALE SALE
SALE SALE
SALE SALE
SALE SALE
SALE Wool SALE
SALE SALE
SALE SALE
SALE ai SALE
SALE SALE
SALE SALE
SALE SALE
SALE SALE
SALE arT SALE
SALE SALE
SALE SALE
SALE Ct. SALE
SALE Cousins5Store SALE
SALE SALE
SALE SALE
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AESALE State Ste tSALE
SALEStre t SLE
SALE SALE
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SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE

". " - - "*I-I
0 -

that they know how to add variety
to their plans, and still remain
within the confines of the theme.
The corridor on the new side of
the Quad will be transformed into
an air terminal to facilitate
transportation from one clime to
another.
Four large gelatine pictures,
illuminated from behind, will
line the walls of the Rio room.
These pictures are color repro-
ductions of actual photographs
taken in the Sugar Loaf region
and have been constructed by
Al Tarbell and his committee.
Andy Graef and his fellow-dec-
orators have created an igloo
through which dancers will enter
the snowy Arctic land. Quick Carl-
son, Bob Hammerstein and Harry
Sunningham head the com-
mittee in charge of converting the
Greene-Hinsdale dining hall into
an African jungle.
Decorations for the exotic Ori-
ental scene are under the direc-
tion of Ed Green and Dn Far-
rand.
WAA Notices
Officials' Club: The National
Softball Examination will be given
at 5 p.m. Monday in Barbour Gym.
The Coaching Division will meet
at 5:10 p.m. Tuesday on Palmer
Field, if the weather is nice. Oth-
erwise, it will meet at 5 p.m. Wed-
nesday in WAB.
* * *
Tennis Club-Members will meet
at 5 p.m. Wednesday at WAB.
Bring rackets and balls if weather
is nice.
Folk and Square Dancing Club
Bring dues to the meeting at 7:30
p.m. Wednesday at WAB.
* * *
Athletic Managers-House ath-
letic managers will meet at 5 p.m.,
Wednesday in WAB to discuss
WAA policies for 1949-50.
PLANNING
A PARTY?
For high quality printing
AT LOW COST

Dance Today
Dustpan and broom will be the
theme today at the Michigan Un-
ion.
The "Clean Sweep" Dance spon-
sored by the Michigan Union from
9 p.m. to midnight tomorrow night
in the main ball room will have
spring house cleaning as its pre-
dominant mood.
* * *

t)

"

7

ON THE EAST COAST?

r

Sign up today with,

m---U

C'

1h

\'1

VV
MEN..1.if it's
$995 $109"' t,~.$1q95
... you want to pay for shoes, don't fail to see the out-
standing values we are offering at these low prices -
made by Bostonian - Weyenberg - Plymouth.
We are also showing many new spring styles by
Florsheim and Bostonian at $14.95 to $17.95. All white

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