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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 20, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-04-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

cattered Alumni Get Help
'rm 'U' Field Secretary

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Poll Subjects Vary from Jokes to Cheating

By PHOEBE FELDMAN
"We're here to help alumni with
zny problem they have or think
they have."
, That's the way J. Stuart Finlay-
'son, '48, field secretary of the
Alumni Association, describes the
purpose of the University grad-
Gov. Williams
To Be Judge
for CaseClub
Gov. G. Mennen Williams will
lbe one of the Judges on the 1949
p'ase Club "bench" during the
club's finals at the Law School
nnd will also give a talk on "The
,{awyer in Politics" at a banquet
ollowing the mock trial Wednes-
'day.
The argument in the trial will
be on a constitutional question
dealing with a hypothetical in-
pome tax law. It will -be held at
B p.m. in Rm. 100 Hutchins Hall
and is open to the public.
* * *
STUDENTS participating in the
4rial are Gordon Boozer and Bern-
ard Trott as one team; and John
glam and William Pierce as the
other. Glenn W. Curtis, Detroit
lawyer, will award the winning
finalists with the Henry M. Camp-
bell Award, obtained from the in-
pome of a $4,000 University en-
dowment.
Following the trial Gov. Wil-
liams will talk at the Case Club
Banquet at 6:30 p.m. in the Un-
ion.
Besides Gov. Williams, the
judges will include Judge Frank
A. Picard of the United States
District Court in Detroit, Justice
Leland W. Carr of the Michigan
Supreme Court and E. Blythe Sta-
son, dean of the University Law
School.
Gov. Williams is a Michigan
alumnus, having received his Law
Degree here in 1936. Before he
won the election for Michigan's
governor by 149,000 votes over his
Republican rival, he served in the
Navy 'during World War II.
TUXEDO nd
TAILS RENTALS
ALL NEW -ALL SIZES
Locally Stocked
See
RABW*AUdWA&R s

uates' group. Helping the alumni
clubs is Finlayson's job.
AS FIELD SECRETARY, Fin-
layson must be a man of many tal-
ents, for his office functions as
general information center, book-
ing agency, contact center and
off-the-cuff publishing outfit.
If alumni want to find out
anything about the University,
past, present or future, they
ask the Alumni Association
about it, according to Finlayson.
But probably one of the most
rewarding part of Finlayson's in-
formation service is answering
queries like "Whatever happened
to Bernie Benson who sat next
to me in Chemistry in '40?"
Through the Alumni Catalog
Office, which lists approximately
130,000 University graduates for
about 50 years back, Finlayson can
claim to have reunited many old
friends and relatives.
* * *
HE HAS EVEN helped start
new friendships among University
graduates. Alumni siezed with
wanderlust often ask for lists of
fellow former students living in
faraway places. And with Univer-
sity people located throughout the
world, wandering alumni often
find valuable new friends on the
foreign shores.
When he started in his job
last year, Finlayson soon dis-
covered that a diplomatic in-
stinct was a valuable asset to an
alumni secretary. He found that
his letters to the graduate
groups have to hit that happy
medium between the "Hi, Joe,
How's the old poker game go-
ing?" and "Received yours of
the twenty-fifth . . . " level.
An intimate acquaintance with
football is pretty essential for an
alumni field secretary. For Fin-
layson often finds himself "acting
as a sort of impromptu sports
commentator at club meetings as
I show the football films."
IN ADDITION to helping the
alumni get football tickets, Fin-
layson also acts as general book-
ing agent for the University
Alumni Club circuit. A speakerfor
the Oscalusca group, a glee club
at Muskegon and a band concert
for Buffalo are all entertainment
that the field secretary gets for
the alumni around the country.
But probably the part of his
job that Finlayson has most
background for is his off-the-
cuff-publishing of his Field Sec-
retary Bulletins suggesting club
projects. He finds this not so
far afield of his experience as
reporter and '47, editorial direc-
to or The Daily.
Characterizing his position,
Finlayson remarks, "I'm a sort of
'customer's man' to the alumni.
Officially, I help them organize
their clubs, keep them active and
in touch with the University. Ac-
tually, that includes helping them
in practically every way possible."
GREGG COLLEGE
A School of Business-Preferred by
College Men and Women
4 MONTH
INTENSIVE COURSE
SECRETARIAL TRAINING FOR COLLEGE
STUDENTS AND GRADUATES
A thorough, intensive course-starting
June, October, February. Bul-
letin A on request
SPECIAL COUNSELOR for G.I. TRAINING
Regular Day and Evening Schools
Throughout the Year. Catalog
Director, Paul M. Pair, M.A.
THE GREGG COLLEGE
37 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago 3, Illinois

-Daily-Waily Barth
SELLING YOURSELF-Daniel L. Beck gave students construc-
tive advice on successfully selling themselves to their prospective
employers, last night at an open meeting sponsored by Delta
Sigma Pi, professional business fraternity.
Students Must Sell Selves
If 'They Want Jobs---I~eck

119 So. Main St.

Phone 6924

4 Where
GOOD STUDENTS
Meet for
GOOD FOOD
Open Daily
7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.
Closed Sundays

By JOAN WILLENS,
Students who know themselves,
know- the needs of the business in
which they are interested, and
know how they fit the needs of
their prospective employer, should
have no trouble getting a job, ac-
cording to Daniel L. Beck.
Beck, director of the Executive
Selection and Training Institute
Grants Given
To Teachers
Ten members of the University
faculty have received research fel-
lowships for the 1949 summer ses-
sion, totaling about $10,000, ac-
cording to Dean Ralph A. Sawyer
of the Graduate School.
Granted on a basis of academic
accomplishments, they were estab-
lished recently by the Graduate
School to encourage and facilitate
research by faculty members, par-
ticularly by junior members in
language, literature and the social
sciences.
The grants cover the regular'
eight-week summer session; and
are designed to enable the faculty
member to accomplish a definite
research project during the time
he would ordinarily be busy teach-
ing summer school, Dean Sowyer
said.
The recipients will receive ap-
proximately the same as if they
were teaching in the summer ses-
sion, he added.
Fields of study covered by the
fellowships include German, Eng-
lish, Greek and Latin, Italian, his-
tory, political science, mathfnat-
ics, chemistry and library science.
Pi Kappa Lambda
To Initiate Today
Twenty-eight music school stu-
dents will be initiated into Pi
Kappa Lambda, honorary music
society, at an honors program at
11 a.m. today in Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
The Michigan Singers, conduct-
ed "by Maynard Klein, will open
the program with two selections
by Brahms. Wayne Dunlap, chair-
man of the committee on scholar-
ships, will announce honors and
the winner of the Stanley medal,
given for outstanding work in
music.
Also taking part in the initia-
tion ceremony will be Helen Titus,
president of Chi Chapter; Dean
Earl V. Moore, president general
of the chapter; and Prof. Charles
L. Stevenson, who will give an
address on "The Music of Poetry."

of Detroit spoke at an open meet-
ing sponsored by Delta Sigma Pi,
professional business fraternity,
last night.
IE DECLARED that the busi-
ness of getting a job is purely a
sales business-the product being
oneself.
"There may be a million un-
employed, but people are always
being hired, even in the midst of
a depression," he asserted.
Finding out one's interests and
abilities by means of psychological
tests is the first step toward get-
ting the job for which one is best
fitted, Beck said.
"MANY EMPLOYERS now in-
sist upon such test results as ref-
erences," he added, "because they
are a measurement of you."
Beck emphasized the impor-
tance of knowing how to get
along with people. "Every con-
tact is a sales contact, because
people determine one's future,"
he continued, recommending a
course in salesmanship. - .°
"In adopting- yourself to busi-
ness ways," Beck advised, "dress
in the manner that will compli-
ment your employer.
* * *
HE STRESSED the importance
of going after a specific job, after
studying the industry carefully,
rather than asking the prospective
employer what job was available.
Beck pointed out that employ-
ers' technique often are not those
recommended by college textbooks,
but as "freshmen in the business
world," students should withhold
criticism until they are acquainted
with the business situation and
have gained their employer's con-
fidence.

By PHIL DAWSON
Opinion polls-despite the ridi-
cule that has been heaped upon
them-are still popular with col-
lege newspaper editors, who con-
duct surveys of student opinion on
everything from card-playing to
Communism.
Few of the surveys claim to be
scientific, but that neither pre-
vents them from trying to find
out what students think nor dim-
inishes their influence on the
campus.
* * *
A SURVEY on women's hours
regulations at Northwestern Uni-
versity revealed that more than
half thestudents are generally
satisfied with the present rules.
On weekend nights women
must be in by 2 a.m. This was
considered generally satisfactory
by 63 per cent, although 67 per
cent wanted it extended for spe-
cial events such as formal
dances.
Less approval-54 per cent-was
expressed on the weekday hour
regulation requiring women to be
in by 10:30 p.m. Slightly less than
10 per cent wanted complete abol-
ition of hours regulation.
* * *
STUDENT CHEATING was the
subject of a small spot survey at
Purdue University, where about 33
per cent said they used crib sheets
occasionally in taking tests.
A frequent response was: "If
the guys want to use them and
can get by with it, it is up to
them," except where cheating
upsets the grading system.
Causes of cheating were said to
be a desire to avoid wearisome
Navy To Seek
New Officers
Representatives of the Detroit
Office of Naval Procurement will
be on campus today and tomorrow,
to interview applicants for regu-
lar Navy or Navy, Reserve com-
missions.
Interviewees should apply at the
Bureau of Appointments, Admin-
istration Building, on those days.
All interviews will be conducted
between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m.
College graduates or seniors
completing their work this semes-
ter are eligible for application, ac-
cording to Capt. Homer B. Wheel-
er, of the NROTC department.
Play To Be Given
By Radio Students
Students in the radio division of
the speech department will pre-
sent "Out on a Limb," a dramatiz-
ation of Louise Baker's best-selling
autobiography at 10:45 a.m. today
over Station WPAG.
Contiruing the "Red Feather on
the Air" series, "Out on a Limb"
is the story of a courageous girl
who succeeds in overcoming a
handicap. It will feature Shirley
Dancey in the leading role.
Also heard on the program
which is being sponsored by the
Michigan Society for Crippled
Children and Disabled Adults will
be Barbara Connor, Don Hall,
Jane Proctor, Joyce Atchison,
Stan Challis, Jean Hendel, Nafe
Katter and Martha DeLano.

COLUMNS,

memorization and a feeling that
"some instructors have lost sight
of the fact that there are courses
other than their own." One stu-
dent said the use of crib sheets is
developing into an exacting sci-
ence; and the university might do
well to offer a course in it.
Another observed that, "the use
of crib sheets is like sex; it is here
to stay."
A BAN on card-playing in the
student union at San Jose State
College, California, was blasted by
almost all students in an opinion
survey. Said one:
"If students want to waste
their time at cards, let them do
it." The ban was later lifted.
And in a poll on a proposed re-
vision of student government at
Ohio State University, upperclass-
men "definitely . . . have a more
mature viewpoint . . ." according
to the OSU Lantern.
* * *

I

,10

Continuing our

yl t -

Ap

magazine at the University of
Washington, was subjected to an
opinion poll to discover whether it
contained too many dirty jokes.
The consensus was that it did,
although one student said:
"Put in more dirty jokes . .
how can I complete my thesis on
'Far Western Pornography' if
they cut out Columns?"
The report of a student govern-
ment subcommittee later said the
magazine was apparently operat-
ing on the theory that "dirty jokes
sell a magazine."
ALSO at the University of
Washington, a survey disclosed
that about 40 per cent of the stu-
dents support the dismissal of
three professors for membership
in the Communist Party.
However, 58 per cent said yes
to the question: "Do you believe
the board of regents should fol-
low the majority recommendations
from the faculty tenure commit-
tee?" The committee had recom-

w 4

i

A dramatic clearance of Spring mer-
chandise to prepare for a wonderful
summer of Fashion and Value!
Drastically Reduced!
DRESSES ... SUITS . .. COATS
SPORTSWEAR . . . ACCESSORIES
MILLINERY ... SHOES
Jack6n_.

IU

mended retaining the professors,
two of whom admitted Communist
Party membership.
And 55 per cent said no to the
question: "Does membership in
the Communist Party make a
faculty member incompetent,
dishonest or in neglect of duty?"
The report in the University of
Washington Daily said the poll
"produced a tangled skein of il-
logical results."
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CASTILIAN GROUP, ANDALUSIAN
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DEPARTURES JUNE 29 TO JULY 2
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For Descriptive Folder Write:
SPANISH STUDENT TOURS
500 Fifth Ave., N.Y. 18, N.Y.

campus

"humor"

MIELKE'S
Cafe
120 E. Washington St.

Don't Miss The
BOOK SALE
and Stationery Sale
TODAY AT

Shirts

and

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49 8.

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an evening at ease, it's all the same to
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