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April 14, 1949 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-04-14

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TIE MICHIGAN DAILY ThUSDAY, APIU, 14, 1H9

Trial of Reds
To Be Subject
Of Discussion
AVC, Lawyers Guild
Back Union Forum
The pro and con of the current
New York trial of 12 American
Communists will be debated at a
panel discussion at 4:15 p.m. to-
morrow in the Union.
Three speakers are scheduled to
speak at the panel which is spon-
sored by the campus chapter of
AVC and the Lawyer's Guild.
They are: Prof. Preston W. Slos-
son of the history department,
Prof. Paul G. Kauper of the law
school and Ernest Goodman, a De-
troit attorney.
Each speaker will be allowed ten
minutes to present his argument.
The meeting will then be thrown
open to questions and discussions
by the audience.
Truman Talk
At U' Favored
By Williams
Michigan's Governor G. Men-
nen Williams has pledged all-out
support of AVC, campus chapter's
campaign to schedule a Truman
talk on campus.
In a letter sent to John Sloss,
AVC chairman, the Governor in-
dicated he would be happy to act
as sponsor in the event the Presi-
dent accepted AVC's offer.
Mr. Truman was contacted sev-
eral weeks ago, but has as yet sub-
mitted no reply to the telegram.
By way of response to this new
development, Sloss said, "AVC
members and myself still entertain
hopes of getting Mr. Truman to
speak at the University, despite his
statement that he plans no trip at
this time."

SCRRENI)ERS - F rcda Liutcn
(above), 3, was the last of 20
persons sought in cownection
with Sovid Rssanespionage
activities insCanada. She sur-
rendered to police in Montreal,
Canada, early this week.

Awaw~s

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(Continued from Page 1)
Arthur Dudden, and Gwendolyn
Duell.
The list continues with Elea-
nor Eppstein, Fredrick Gehring,
Allan Goodman, Louise Goss,
Gustav Gregory, William Hen-
derson, Chih-tzu Kao, Norman
Kurland, Marvin Levich, Daniel
Lu, William Lunk, Eugene Mi-
gotsky, Edward Norbeck, Doug-
las Parker, Howard Raiffa, Rob-
ert Riddell, Jr., George Rinker,
Stanley Saulson, Homer Schamp,
Jr., Edgar Schein, Robert Schol-
ten, Jerome Stein, Ivan Steiner,
Richard Strong, Hoomer Swan-
der, Albert Vilialon-Galdames,
Frank Webb, Ernest Wenrick,
Elba Wilcox, Edwin Yahiel, and
Cheng-tseng Yu .
The University scholarships of
tuition were awarded to the fol-
lowing students: Raymond Baker,
William Bechill, Ho Chow, Dor-
othy Cormack, Merton Davis, Iris
Dibner, John Dickson, Tom Dinell,
Arthur Downing, Leona Wisele,
Leanore Frane.
* * *
THE LIST continues with Wil-
liam Fuller, Robery Gordillo, Peter
Hershman, James Jackson, Harley
Jennings, Jr., John King, Clara
Leith, William Liddicoat, Vi-Cheng
Liu, Wen-rya Lui, William Maxon,
Vincent Peters, Lois Pratt, Bert-
ram Raven, Ada Rich, Fredrick
Robertson, Robert Russell, Rob-
ert Seall, Patarasp Sethna, John
Slater, Marion Spalsbury, Ger-
trude Urey, Elspeth Wallace,
Laura Winchester, Marian Win-
terbottom.
The 18 awards from special
trust funds and memorials were
of varying amounts. Morton
Curtis was awarded the Carl
Braun Fellow.sbip of :500 for
study in rmath':m tics.The
Fanny Burr Buter Fellowship,
which is a memri d to a former
faculty member in Latin and
Greek, was awarded to Edith
Kovach.
Three Edwin S. Reserve Fellow-
ships were granted to students in
zoology. These were established as
part of a plan to promote work in
natural history. The rLcipients are
Kurt Bohnsack, Kenneth Prescott
and Dana Snyder.
THE LAWTON Fellowship in
astronomy was awarded to Ed-
ward Lewis and the Henry Earle
Riggs Fellowship in chemistry to
Richard Bard.
Seven students have been
awarded Metropolitan Commun-
ity Research Seminar Fellow-
ships and will pursue research
studies in Flint. They are F.
Gerard Adams, Arthur Cohen,
George Henrickson, Perry Nor-
ton, Samuel Pratt, Robert Rich-
ert and Dorothee Strauss.
The F. C. and Susan Eastman
Newcomb Fellowships in Plant
Physiology were awarded to Avery
Gallup and Seymour Shapiro. Ha-
zel Batzer and Myron Horowitz
received the Henry A. Parker Fel-
lowships in English. The Anna
Olcott Smith Fellowship was
awarded to Catherine Weaver.

Campus
Calendar
Pan American Day-Special tea,
4:30 to 6 p.m., International Cen-
ter. Dr. Enrique Loaiza, Mexican
educator will be guest.
Young Democrats-Hicks Grif-
fith, Etate Democratic Chairman,
and the man who steered Gov.
Williams into office last Novem-
ber, will speak, 7:30 p.m., Union.
Journal of the Air-Semi-docu-
mentary on veterans' return to
college life, 5 p.m., WUOM.
Workshop Drama -- "Friendly
and Dumpy," the story of a hen-
pecked husband, 10:15 p.m.
WHRV.
Art Cinema League-"The Well-
digger's Daughter," will begin a
three-day run at 8:30 p.m., Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Willow Village Concert - Uni-
versity Repertoire Orchestra and
Arts Chorale, 8 p.m., West Lodge
Auditorium.
Democratic Socialist Club -
Business meeting, 7:30 p.m., Lane
Hall.
List Scholarship,
Fellowship Grants
The winners of the annual
awards in chemistry have been an-
nounced for next year, according
to R. W. Parry of the Chemistry
Department.
Three undergraduate scholar-
ships were awarded to Edward
Meyers, 50; Herbert Title, 50; and
William Clingman, 51. .Three
graduate chemistry students re-
ceived fellowships: William Rich-
ard, Kirby Melton and Richard
Bard.
Garg Asks Stories
Contributions for the May issue
of Gargoyle are due by April 22 at
the Gargoyle Office, 106 Publica-
tions Bldg.
Light stories and poems looking
forward to vacation will be fea-
tured. Serious material will also
be acceptable.
TYPEWRITERS
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With men on the short end of
a five to one female-male ratio,
the isolated city of Trinidad on
the island of Cuba provides fer-
tile ground for a camera.
Aubert Lavastida, formerly of
the University Romance Language
Department, has filmed the life
and surroundings of this cit,
whose customs and beliefs are 300
years behind 20th century civili-
zation. Lavastida's 100 minute
technicolor film will be shown at
8:30 p.m. Saturday at Pattengill
Auditorium.
* * *
BECAUSE OF isolation by
mountains and rivers Trinidad
city has little contact with the
outside world. Buildings, roads

and household utensils are made
from clay, just as they were in
17th century Spain.
According to Lavastida, the
pages of history turned back
when he visited Trinidad city.
"Although the people living
there are aware of the outside
world they would rather live in
accordance with their ancient
ways."
"Fishermen in Trinidad city
don't bother to bait their hooks,"
he said. "Fish are so plentiful that
when bait is thrown over the side
of the boat the fish bite onto the
empty hook."
* * *
LAVA STIDA said those people

who do leave Trinidad city always
return because they like the sim-
ple and plentiful life of their na-
tive village.
"One of the women there was
offered a Hollywood contract
but she refused because the ties
of antiquity were too strong for
her to break," he said.
People from the outside world
who go to Trinidad city and at-
tempt to modernize it don't
succeed, according to Lavastida.
Either they become assimilated
into the ancient Spanish town or
leave the village questioning the
advantages of civilization, he' con-
tinued.

CAMERA BUG'S PARADISE:
Former' U'Instruct or Films Trinidad

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