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April 14, 1949 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-04-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 1949

ERP Risks Failure in Five of 19

Areas

* *

ST. MARY'S STUIDENTCHAPEL

- and her foremost allies, Britain
and France. The ECA, mixing in,
. has already been stung.
ECA, because that is its mis-
sion, views Western Germany
as an economic problem. But it
is one in which political and
military problems inevitably
overshadow anything economic.
Presumably American policy is
based on the belief that Western
German's quick recovery is essen-
tial for the economic health of
_ Europe. Both Britain and France,
but France particularly, have
shown alarm that Western Ger-
many may become a strong in-
dustrial competitor and an aggres-
sive threat. Their maneuvers have
impeded Western German's re-
vival.
* * *
THERE is not yet even a joint
recovery program for the French
and U.S.-British zones, although
the ECA has pleaded for one. Yet
Western Germany absorbed over
one billion dollars from American
taxpayers in a year.
Britain suppiied Western Ger-
many with the equivalent of
$70,000,004) in foodstuffs, ship-
ping services and other items.
France supplied nothing.
Frenchmen have considered
American haste to stimulate West-
ern German's recovery as a ju-
venile delusion, or worse. They
say it has mocked the tragic les-
sons of history.
* * *
(ECA OFFICIALS in Washing-
ton. however, report a marked
brightening of prospects for re-
covery Germany now is making.
The State Department has an-
nounced agreement on halting the
removal of scores of industrial
plants from the British and
French zones. The plants were be-
ing dismantled as reparations, or
standing idle awaiting removal.
At ECA's insistence, an under-
standing has been reached by

/illiam and Thompson Streets

SCHEDULE FOR HOLY WEEK SERVICES
THURSDAY 8 A.M. Mass
8 P.M. Holy Hour

Group Gives
nsfor
T.uman Win
By PAUL BRENTLINGER
In a post-mortem of last No-
vember's election. the University's
Survey Research Center has come
up with the answer to exactly why
President Truman surprised all
the pollsters and emerged as a
surprise victor.
Results of the survey, made pub-
lic in vacation week, show that
the Democrats triumphed in No-
vember simply because they out-
numbered the Republicans, not
because the Republicans failed to
go to the polls. Actually, many
more Democrats than Republicans
stayed home on election day.
* * *
DIRECTED BY Prof. Angus
Campbell and Robert L. Kahn, the
study was made by interviewing a
cross-section of voters throughout
the nation. The local research ex-
perts use a highly controlled meth-
od of sampling, which strives to
eliminate biases which can show
up when the interviewer himself
chooses respondents.
Failure of the major poll tak-
ers to use this sort of sampling
was a big reason why they mis-
,udged the election results, ac-
cording to the Survey Research
Center.
The University survey examined
the characteristics of Democratic
and Republican voters, the impor-
tanee of various issues, the effect
of the campaign, and related ques-
tions.
SURVEY FINDINGS indicated
that Republican voters were more
likely to make their decisions early
n the campaign, and less likely to
change their mind.
Those still undecided in Oc-
tober voted two to one for the
Missourian. Thus, those polls
which ceased operations early in
the campaign were obviously
doomed to embarrassment on
the morning after election.
The Democratic strength was in
the lower age groups, the labor-
ing groups, farmers, and the low-
er income groups. Dewey drew
most of his strength from the col-
lege educated, the businessmen,
and the high-income groups.
SINCE LOW-INCOME families
outnumber high-income families,
and laborers are more prevalent
than professional people, it is not
hard to see wh'y the University
alumnus went down to defeat last
fall.

.. . ... . . .......... . ...... ...

HOLY WEEK

/

SERVICES

FRIDAY

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YOUR FRATERNITY CAN mUY NOTHING FINER
YOU CAN SURELY AFFORD TO BIY NOTHING LESS
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 South Univ'r it, Phone 9533
*Samples and prices w I1 e ava1 I11 ti mth,

r

_ii

12 NOON 'TIL 3 P.M.

Tre Ore

Mass of the Pre-Sanctified
Sermons on the Passion.
Stations of the Cross
Stations of the Cross

C hC
VILLA( GE£CHURCH
(INTERDENOMINATIONAL)
UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY CENTER
CHAPEL
. WILLOW RUN VILLAGE
TONIGHT 8 P.M.
OFFICE OF TENEBRAE
b WITH HOLY COMMUNION
GOOD FRIDAY 8 P.M.
ENTIRE SERVICE IN SACRED MUSIC
"THE SEVEN LAST WORDS" by Tomas DuBois
REV. J. EDGAR EDWARDS, Chaplain
CLAYTON T. BIGELOW, Choir Director
FREDERICK DON TRUESDELL, Organist
EASTER SERVICE - 10:45 A.M.

7:30 P.M.

SATURDAY 8 A.M. Mass

EASTER

Low Mass-8 A.M., 1 1 A.M., 12 noon.
High Mass-9:30 A.M.

Map by Bob Korff
ERP NEEDS AID-Economic recovery of te above areas is re-
ported jeopardized by political and military squabbles.
* * * *
which plants in many vital indus-" PREWAR Austria staggered
tries will be spared and set to through one financial crisis after
work.) another. The possibility of post-

"""""""""

I

Easter at the Michigan League

For leisure dining on
Easter may we suggest:
Breakfast-9 to 11 A.M.
Ann Arbor Room
(by reservation only)
Dinner-12:00 to 3 P.M.
Main dining room
In addition we offer:
Cafeteria, serving:
Breakfast-S$:30 - 10 A.M.
Dinner-12 to 3 P.M.

BREAKFAST SPECIALS
ANN ARBOR ROOM
Chilled Orange Juice or Apricot Nectar
Hot Cross Buns made in our own bakery
Scrambled Eggs, Canadian Bacon
Jelly and Orange Marmalade '
Pot of Cof fee ................ $1.00 plus tax
CAFETERIA
Chilled Fruit Juice
Hot Cross Buns made in our own bakery
Scrambled Eggs and Diced 1Ham
Orange Marmalade
Pot of Coffee ..................65c plus tax

But even if a "balance of pay-
ments" is somehow achieved by
1952, it is generally conceded
that Western Germany would
necd huge sums of long-term in-
vestment capital, perhaps more
that two billion dollars a year.
Nobody predicts a flood of for-
eign investors.
Greece is anomer headache for
ECA. One of the poorest countries
in Europe to start with, Greece is
in her ninth year of armed strug-
gle, first against the Axis, then
against Communists.
ECA All) has amounted to
$172,000,000 for the first year.
Even this may have to be in-
creased in volume.
Greece has no fInancial sta-
bility, her refugee problem is
enormous, her army is bigger
than ever, and the guerrilla war
drags on.
Austria, a rump state left over
from the dismemberment of an
enemy empire in 1918, emerged
from the second world war sup-
posedly recognized as a liberated
nation. To date, she has been de-
prived of an inpendence treaty,
Russian commissars dominate sev-
eral of her major industries in-
cluding oil, and her foreign assets
are lost.

war solvency for occupied Austria
is still out of sight.
The free territary of Trieste,
which the United States, Britain
and France now want to hand
back to Italy, has cost ECA $17A
000,000 in a year. The money re-
paired some port facilities, en-
couraged the rebuilding of several
factories, and kept the people
from starving.
As long as Trieste dangles alone
at the edge of the iron curtain, it
probably will be a candidate for
U.S. charity. Just to protect it
requires the continued presence of
10,000 American and British
troops-one soldier for every 33 ci-
vilians. A third of the working
population is unemployed.

IL

iiA
}y::hJA

LUBRICATING

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GEO. W. CAMP
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Packard at Hill Street
TIRES ACCESSORIES
~~~- -~ ~ - ---- ---~ -~~~ ---

508 E. Williams
in Ann Arbor-
Tuck a
in the Easter Gift Basket

II

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Your Hat Is Here For

Beauty
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,)05
For 8 A.M. delivery to your door for the
remainder of the semester.

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Compact, rich-toned, value-priced
TABLE RADIO-PHONOGRAPH
A gift that spells enjoyment of $ 995
prized "platters" and favorite radio
shows anywhere in the house, at
the lake cottage, in the school dorm. Light-
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12" records with lid closed. Sensitive radio;
Alnico V speaker. Walnut-finish wood cabinet.
Deluxe Automatic Phonograph-Radio in a trim
table-fop cabinet. Mahogany finish, $49.95

Adam rates the number one spot on the "Hat
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Music "on-the-move"-

I

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