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March 26, 1949 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,
SATURDAY,

CHORAL UNION FINALE:
Busch To Lead Chicago
Symphony Concert Here

I.

Britain Slow To Accept
German Culture---Gillies

rt) 1

Fritz Busch, distinguished oper-
atic and symphonic conductor,
will make his first local appear-
ance at 7 p.m. tomorrow in Hill
Auditorium as conductor of the
Chicago Symphony Orchestra.
Tomorrow's concert will be the

final program in the
Choral Union season.

current

'U' Will Offer
New Classes
To Physicians
Completing this year's series of
short refresher courses in post-
graduate medicine are six more
classes announced yesterday by
Dr. Howard H. Cummings, chair-
man of the Medical School'spost-
graduate department.
Rheumatic diseases will be the
central topic of next week's classes,
beginning on Monday. Other top-
ics are as follows: diseases of the
heart, April 4 to 8; diseases of the
blood and blood-forming organs,
April 11 to 15; common pedia-
tric problems, April 13 to 15; treat-
ment of allergy, April 18 to 22; and
diagnostic X-ray, April 25 to 29.
Each of these courses is organ-
ized as a refresher for thegeneral
practioner, in which the latest di-
agnostic and treatment techniques
will be reviewed.

BUSCH HAS directed more than
120 orchestras in Europe and
South America to win acclaim as
one of the world's most distin-
guished opera and concert leaders.
Born in Siegen, Westphalia,
in 1890, he is the oldest brother
of violinist Adolph Busch. Both
boys were encouraged to begin
their musical careers by their
father, and conductor Busch
later studied at Cologne Univer-
sity.
He first won attention as con-
ductor of the Dresden Opera but
resigned a lifetime contract with
the Opera in protest against the
rise of Adolph Hitler.
Busch conducted in Buenos
Aires, Stockholm and"Sussex, Eng-
land after leaving Germany and
was in Stockholm when the Ger-
mans invaded Denmark.
* * *
HE MADE HIS first American
appearance in New York in 1927
and in 1942 he returned as guest
conductor of the New York Phil-
harmonic symphony. Four years
ago he became conductor of the
New York Metropolitan Opera.
The noted musician was guest
conductor of the Chicago Sym-
phony during the 1947 season
and again last year during the
orchestra's summer concerts at
Ravinia.
Tickets may be purchased at the
Hill box office immediately pre-
ceding tomorrow's concert.

MILDRED GILLARS.
......Unflinrching
'Sally' Draws
10-30 Year
Prison Term
Attorney Calls Trial
Unfair;_Files Appeal
WASHINGTON--('-A federal
judge yesterday sentenced Mildred
.E. (Axis Sally) Gillars to serve 10
* * *
to 30yasinpiofrbod
THE MAINE-BORN woman,
now 48, is the 13th American tried
for treason in the last war and the
sixth found guilty of the only
crime mentioned in the United
States Constitution - betrayal of
her country.
White but unflinching, Miss
Gillars took the sentence dry-
eyed with no display of the emo-
tional outbursts that marked
her seven-week trial.
When Judge Edward M. Curran
finished the brief words of judg-
ment, she threw back her head
and walked with swift, short steps
from the courtroom.
Later, her half sister, Mrs.
Edna Mae Herrick, of Conneaut,
Ohio, told newsmen:
eyed with *o di *a h m-

STATIONERY
CLEARANCE
59c ...per box
2 boxes ... $1.00
THE CRAFT PRESS
(Across from Nickels Arcade)
330 Maynard Phone 8805

German literature and culture
has never been fully assimilated by
Great Britain, but has had a frag-
mentary effect, according to Prof.
Alexander Gillies of the Univer-
sity of Leeds in England, speaking
~DORM NEWSI
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Contributors to
What's Up in the Dorms should con-
tact Dolores Palanker at The Daly or
105 Betsy Barbour.)-
The Inter-Cooperative Council
held its annual membership stock-
holders' meeting Thursday at
Lane Hall.
* * *
UNIT 4 OF THE New Women's
Dorm presented a Western Party
called "Frontier Daze" from 9 p.m.
to midnight yesterday.
The affair featured a caller
for square dancing as well as
suitable props including a bar
with swinging doors, grave
stones and three bales of hay
scattered decoratively about.
Refreshments included spud-
nuts and cokes with beer labels
pasted on the bottles. Phoney
money was distributed to the
guests.
General chairman for the affair
was Dorothy Webb assisted by
Cherry Richards and Rosemary
Heineman as co-chairman of dec-
orations and Jeanette Dujardin
who was in charge of enertain-
ment.
A NEW CONSTITUTION for
West Quad was ratified by the
Quad Council at their Monday
meeting.
The constitution, which will
replace the present one passed
in 1939 when the Quad was
opened, must be passed by six
of the eight houses in the Quad
to become law.
A committee of six, headed by
George Roumell, was appointed
in October to study and draw up
the new constitution.
* * *
HAYDEN HOUSE, in West
Quad, held a special meeting Wed-
nesday night to submit the new
constitution to the house resi-
dents.
Refreshments were served and
a movie, "Desert Victory," was
shown to the men.
The constitution will be posted
on the bulletin board so that all
may read it and signify their
approval.
THE FIRST ISSUE of the West
Quad's new paper, called "The
Every-Other Daily," appeared
Wednesday on Quad newsstands.
The purpose of the Paper, ac-
cording to its co-editors-Don
Fiekowski, of Williams House, and
John Davies, of Michigan House-
is "to present news and views of
what's goin'g on in the houses.
clubs and organizations in the
Quad."
- M
LLOYD HOUSE, in West Quad,
will present its annual Alumni
Dance from 8 p.m. to midnight
today. Any man who has lived
in Lloyd House for at least one
year is considered an alumnus
and is invited to attend.
Social co-chairmen of the af-
fair, Len Steinbrueck and Bob
Graham, have announced that
several of the top bands of the
nation will provide the music.
On the intermission program is
the Lloyd Lungers, the name giv-
en to the recently organized Lloyd
singing group which is making its
debut at this affair. The Lungers
have been reported to be at their
best when singing the many tra-

ditional Michigan songs.

in Rackham Amphitheatre yester-
day.
Prof. Gillies, who discussed the
influence of German literature on
English literature in the 19th cen-
tury, said that it was not until the
poet Coleridge became interested
in German writers and philoso-
phers that Great Britain as a
whole took up their study.
"COLERIDGE, however, never
appreciated Goethe and Schiller,"
said Prof. Gillies, "and it was notI
until later in the 19th century
when Carlyle began his study of
the German masterpieces that
*Faust' was fully appreciated."
Prof. Gillies, who is in the
United States on the occasion of
the 200th anniversary of the birth
of Goethe, declared that while
German science and theology has
had much influence in Great Brit-
ain, its literature has not been so
extensively accepted.
George Meyer
Wins Award
George Herbert Meyer, '49, has
been named winner of the William
Jennings Bryan Prize in political
science.
The prize, $35 worth of books, is
awarded to the member of the
graduating class in the literary
college who has shown the great-
est proficiency in political sci-
ence.
Meyer had a straight-A average
in the subject at the beginning of
this semester.
-Tovarich' Enters
Final Showings
The speech department's final
showings of the comedy "Tova-
ric" will be at 2:30 p.m., and 8
p.m. today.
Specially priced student tickets
may be had at the box office for
the matinee performance of the
Deval comedy.

Bird Display
Presented at
MainLibrary
Spring is being given an all-out
welcome in the current General
Library exhibit on ornithology.
The display features plates and
paintings of such colorful birds as
the ashy-headed green pigeon of
India and the golden-winged war-
bler.
INCLUDED are paintings by
two graduate students in zoology,
Robert M. Mengel and Robert S.
Busch.
Several of the hand-colored
plates from the famous mono-
graph on humming birds by
John Gould, the great English
authority on ornithology are
shown.
A charming touch is added to
the exhibit by an account of the
love life of the mocking bird, in
the text accompanying the plates
of Audubon's "Birds of America."
The exhibit was arranged by
Miss Ella Hymans, curator of the
rare book department of the li-
brary.

DIZZY
GILLESPIE
JAZZ CONCERT
Tuesday, March 29
8-11 P.M.
Tickets on sole of
your favorite record shop
All Seats Reserved
$2.00 tax included

PATTENGILL AUDITORIUM
Ann Arbor High School

._

Read and Use Daily Classified Ads

"I DONT THINK Ethel Barry-
more could have received the ver-
dict any better."
Defense counsel James J.
Laughlin filed a formal notice of
appeal immediately after the
sentence, contending she had
not had a fair trial.
The maximum sentence for Miss
Gillars' offense would have been
death in the electric chair; the
minimum, five years imprison-
ment.

VET'S
WATCH REPAIR
Is your watch a-
Dick Tracy watch?-It's noisy
Striker's watch?-been sat on
Army watch?-lt's drab
Blue Front-State and Packard
West Lodge PX-Willow Lodge

MAX McLAUGHLIN
presents a

I

A
,

YES!
Travel

with

TRAVELER'S CHECKS
The safest and most convenient way
to carry your money
ANN AuBon DANK

Freshmen Invited
To Join 'X Groups'
George Hoffman, Grad, has in-
vited freshmen interested in "ex-
ploring" to join one of the "X
groups" sponsored by the psychol-
ogy and sociology departments.
For further information stu-
dents should call him at 3-1511,
extension 2237, leaving their name,
phone number and time they may
be contacted if Hoffman should
not be in when they call, he said.
Announcernents
Engineering graduation an-
nouncements are going on sale
again Monday.
They will be sold from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m. in the East Engineering Ex-
tension, outside the Aeronautics
Office on the main floor. Sales had
officially closed this week, but
popular demand called for the ex-
tra day's sale.
Frigid Speed
NEW HAVEN - A Navy wind
tunnel developed air speed of
4,000 mph at a temperature of
minus 377 degrees.

RARE OPPORTUNITY!
STUDY... TRAVEL
ht SPAIN
CASTILIAN GROUP, ANDALUSIAN
GROUP, BASQUE-CATALAN GROUP
65 Days ... $975.00
DEPARTURES JUNE 29 TO JULY 2
Sponsored by:
UNIVERSITY of MADRID
For Descriptive Folder Write: .
SPANISH STUDENT TOURS
500 Fifth Ave., N.Y. 18, N.Y.

11

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Ministers: James Brett Kenna and
Erland J. Wang
Music: Lester McCoy, director
Mary McCall Stubbins, organist
Student Activities: Doris Reed, associate
director.
10:45 A.M.: Worship Service. Dr. Kenna's ser-
mon topic: "Enduring Treasure."
5:30 P.M.: "Christian Student Citizenship on
the Campus" is the Panel's topic.
6:30 P.M.: Supper and Fellowship.
ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast).
11:00 A.M.: Junior Church.
11:00 A.M.: The Order of Confirmation. Sermon
by the Rt. Rev. Russell S. Hubbard, Suffragan
Bishop of Michigan.
12:15 P.M.: After Service Fellowship.
5:30 P.M.: Cranmer Guild.
5:30 P.M.: Canterbury Club Supper and Pro-
gram, Canterbury House. Professor Frank L.
Huntley will speak on "Christianity and Mar-
riage.
8:00 P.M.: Evening Prayer, and the Medieval
Morality Play, "The Sacrifice of Isaac."
Tuesday, 10:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
Wednesday, 7:15 A.M.: Holy Communion (fol-
lowed by Student Breakfast).
Thursday, 12:10 to 12:20 P.M.: Intercessions
(followed by Student Lenten Luncheon).
Thursday, 7:30 P.M.: Parish Lenten institute on
the Book of Common Prayer.
Friday, 4:00 to 6:00 P.M.: Open House, Canter-
bury House.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Reading Room, 211 East Washington
Michigan League Ballroom
10:30 A.M.: Sunday Lesson Sermon.
March 27: "Reality"
11:45 A.M.: Sunday School.
8:00 P.M.: Wednesday evening Testimonial
Meeting.
VILLAGE CHURCH FELLOWSHIP
(Interdenominational)
University Community Center
Willow Run Village
Rev. J. Edgar Edwards, Chaplain
10:45 A.M.: Divine Worship. Mendelssohn's Can-
tata "Hear My Prayer." Choir Director, Clay-
ton Bigelow; Organist, Frederick Don Trues-
dell.
10:45 A.M.: Church School and Nursery.
4:30 P.M.: Study and Discussion.
5:30 P.M.: Fellowship Supper.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Roaer Williams Guild House
502 East Huron
10:00 A.M.: Bible Study Class. A study of the
teachings of Jesus.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship. Guest Preacher,
Dr. Val H. Wilson, Director of Student Work
for the Northern Baptist Convention.
5:00 P.M.: Guild Program. Guest speaker, Dr.
Wilson.

i

11

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron
Harold J. DeVries, Pastor
9:15 A.M.: "Your Radio Choir" WPAG.
10:00 and 12:00: Bible School Sessions.
11:00 A.M.: "Wait for the Rain."
6:15 P.M.: Grace Bible Guild Supper.
7:30 P.M.: "The Church of Perpetual Sacrifice."
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL and
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Theodore R. Schmale, D.D.,
Walter S. Press, Ministers
Irene Applin Boice, Director of Music
9:30 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon by Rev.
Press "The Opportunity for Christian Service."
5:30 P.M.: Student Guild. Supper. Rev. Press
will speak on "The History of the Evangelical
and Reformed Church."
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M.: Midweek Lenten Service.
Sermon by Rev. Schmale, "The Fifth Word
Spoken from the Cross."
CHURCH OF CHRIST
YMCA Bldg., Fourth Ave.
Carl York Smith, Minister
10:30 A.M.: Radio WPAG "Take Time To Be
Holy."
11:00 A.M.: "Untamed Tongue."
7:30 A.M.: "The Church Young or New."
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan
F. E. Zendt, Minister to the Congregation
Howard Farrar, Choir Director
9:40 A.M.: Student Bible Class at the Church.
10:50 A.M.: Morning Worship.
Nursery for children during the service.
GUILD HOUSE, 438 Maynard Street
H.L. Pickerill, Minister to Students
Jean Garee, Assistant in Student Work
Student Guild-5:00 supper instead of 6:00. A
program will be given in the sanctuary entitled
"The Cross Triumphant" arranged by Donita
Gibbons and Dana Snyder. Following Spring
Vacation meetings will be held in the Congre-,
gational Church.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Adult Group with Mrs. William
Preston on: State Constitutional Revision.
11:00 A.M.: Services. Rev. Edward H. Redman
preaching on Sorokin's "Reconstruction of Hu-
manity."
6:30 P.M.: Unitarian Students-Mr. Redman
leading discussion on Unitarianism.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
For National Lutheran Council Students
1304 Hill Street
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9:10-10:00 A.M.: Bible Hour at the Center.
10:30 A.M.: Church Worship Services in Zion
and Trinity Churches.
5:30 P.M.: L.S.A. Meeting in Zion Parish Hall.
Election of Officers and Worship Service.
Tuesday-
7:30-8:30 P.M.: Discussion Group at the Cen-
ter.
Wednesday-
4:00-5:30 P.M.: Tea and Coffee Hour at the
Center.
7:30 P.M.: Lenten Services in Zion and Trinity
Churches.

I

I

University Branch

330 S. State

D v
THE 25th ANNiVERSARY SAL E on
dMEN'S andWO N' INE HOESS
at the CAMPUS BOOTERY
IT'S GOING STRONG!!
Many have bought 2 pairs-some 3 pairs. You should
get in on these unusual shoe buys.
The sale will run seven days more. Come this week and
get your size(
MEN'S SHOES Are Selling as Much as
25% off
[' f s t r 1

COMPLETE
DINNER
only75c
DESSERT
and BEVERAGE
INCLUDED
(No Extra Charge)
LUNCH SPECIAL
Soup - Salad
Beverage and Dessert

!1

4

I

IC

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred Scheips, Pastor
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Sunday at 9:45 and at 11:00: Identical Holy
Communion Services, with the pastor preach-
ing on the subject, "Rooted and Built Up In
Christ."
Sunday at 5:30: Supper and Program of Gamma
Delta, Lutheran Student Club.
Wednesday at 7:30: Lenten Vesper Service. Ser-
mon by the pastor, "Vignettes along the Via
Dolorosa."

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D.
Direc. Student Work--Rev. H. L. Pickerill
Assistant-Miss Jean Garee

I

I

1111

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