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March 25, 1949 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1949-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

LGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 1949

_.
J _ --- ---

M - I

CAMPUS HOOVER COMMISSION:
SL Revamps Election Procedure

Phi Eta Sigma Names Qualified Men

.4

Setting up a Citizenship Com-
mittee to guide student elections
by the Student Legislature, came
as the result of several months
digging by an SL Citizenship
Study Committee.
The Committee, which has as
much local prestige as the Hoover
Commission does nationally, pre-
sented a six point program to re-
vamp elections. Four of the pro-
posals were accepted and the rest
tabled in the face of serious oppo-
sition.

THE SECOND proposal accepted
by SL involved a Constitutional
amendment which would make at-
tendance at Legislature tryout
meetings compulsory for candi-
dates and, at the same time,
abandon candidates' petitions.
Ratification in the coming elec-
tion by two-thirds of students vot-
ing will put the amendment into
effect.
The Legislature accepted the
committee's recommendation
that the new permanent Citi-
zenship Committee utilize ex-of-

'Religion in Labor' Conference
To Open at Lane Hall Today _

Spokesmen for labor and man-
agement of the Willow Run Kais-
er-Frazer plant will start the
wheels rolling for a two day Re-
ligion-in-Labor conference at 1:30
p.m. today.
The conference is one of series
sponsored each year by the Stu-
dent Religious Association as part
of a study of social problems.
* * * -
AFTER TOURING the automo-
bile plant, conference members
will return to Lane Hall to the
conference speaker, Rabbi Harry
Essrig, of Grand Rapids.

Later the conference will
unite with Hillel Foundation in
a special program. Rabbi Essrig
will speak on "A Religious Inter-
pretation of Today's Labor Sit-
uation" at 7:45.
The program will continue with
special group discussions on Sat-
urday at Lane Hall.
Discussion leaders will be Prof.
Ronald Freddman, Prof. Clark
Dickinson, Rev. Frank Littell, Rev.
John But, Rabbi Essrig, Robert
Stevens and Gene Martinson.

ficio the experience of SL alum-
ni.
They also passed motion calling
for a study to be made of the Uni-
versity's administrative commit-
tees with the objective of develop-
ing them into joint Student-Fac-
ulty administrative committees.
LAID ASIDE for further consid-
eration were proposals to bring
"major campus organizations"
closer to SL by giving them non-
voting seats. Suggested groups
were Union, League, Student Re-
ligious Association, IFC, AIM, Pan-
Hel and Assembly. Factions op-
posed SRA and tried to add the
Inter-Cooperative Council and
AVC before tabling. President Jans
said he would appoint a commit-
tee to study the motion.
A recommendation that mem-
bers of campus groups also serve
on SL committees was also held
over.
Social Study
Groups Open
Membership
Exploration groups sponsored by
the sociology and psychology de-
partments to help freshmen gain a
perspective of college life are ac-
cepting new members.
These 'X-Groups,' organized last
semester, meet weekly to discuss
problems of interest to the mem-
bers.
DISCUSSION TOPICS can
roughly be divided into three cate-
gories.:
1. Problems with social sig-
nificance such as prejudice and
racial discrimination.
2. Political problems with em-
phasis on US foreign policy and
the United Nations.
3. Personal problems of dat-
ing, family relations and study
habits.
By means of 'role playing,' a de-
vice which employs students act-
ing out situations, many issues
are clarified.
* * *
UNDERSTANDING of some
topics has been aided by inviting
faculty members to give informal
talks.
Last semester, most of the
groups were either all men or all
women. This year, however, the
planning committee feels that
the groups willfunction better if
they are mixed.
Groups are limited to 12 mem-
bers each with one faculty mem-
ber to act as advisor.

Names of the mien ,IiLibl for
hi Eta im r m i; I"
announcei i Jcrn Goidnan.
president of the mi diOn.
Eligibility is ba: .d on the
achievement of a 3. 5average for
the first freshman semester or an
overall 3.5 average for both se-
mesters.
* * *
POTENTIAL members are Ger-
ald Abramow, Constantine-Doras
Argyriadis, Richard Aster. Ken-
neth Averill. John Beck, Carll
Beers, Edward Belcher, John Bel-
jan, George Benisek. Dwight
Bicker, Robert Bloom, Herbert
Boothroyd, Stephen Bromberg,
Ernest Brookfield, Richard Burns,
Donald Brown ,James Cassidy,
James Castelli, Bangalore Chel.-
varajan.
The list continues with Russel
Church, James Clark, Ralph
Clark, Douglas Cutler, Daniel
Dow, Jack Edick, James Ekwall,
Henry Elsner, Armando Giar-
dini, Jack Gillette, Lawrence
Gottlieb, Thomas Graham,
Leonard Greenbaum, Glecn n
Guthrie, John Hall, Robert
Hartman, Charles Hays, John
Hensel, Carl Heyer, James Hil-
and earn
2%
current rate on insured
savings

Lower Prices Sale
100;, WOOL
GREY FLANNEL
Regular $9.95 Value
$588
ALTERATIONS FREE
Immediate Service I ;

debrand, Ralph Hileman, Har-
old Hood, Robert Horwitch,1
John Huntington, Irving Jaeger,z
David Jahsman, Jerome Jelinek,
Robert Kaplan;, Robert Keith,
Lawrence Lange, Howard Low.
Others are Samuel Luborsky,
Roger McLaughlin, W. Modlin,
James Moran, Arthur Nelson,
Donald Nelson, Leslie Noaker,
Lorne Norton, James Nyberg,
Douglas Peck, Jules Perlberg. John
Piazza. Frederick Pierce, Edward
Poindexter, Jerome Porter, Robert
Radner, Charles Rank, Johnc
Riecker, Arthur Rose, James Ross.
Donald Rothschild, Milton Schie-F

sen, Garry Schott, Herbert Sher-
bin, James Simonsen, Stephen
Smale. James Smigel, Jerold Sol-
ovy.
The names continue with Frank
Stocking, Bruce Swanson, Richard
Thomas, Thomas Verhake, Curtis
Verschoor, Arthur Waltz, David
Weigel, Milford Wenokur. Frank-
lin Westervelt, Justin Wilder, Deil
Wright, George Zazanis, Joseph
Zinnas.
Eligible freshmen whose names
do not appear are asked to con-
tact Jerome Goldman, 304 Strauss
House, 2-4591.

k

Our New
Everyday
Low Prices!
LEVI'S

$ itu

Daily-Olilinger
SOLE INTEREST-Jesse Brown draws on his 18 years of experi-
ence in shoe repair to see that foot-weary University students
are kept well shod. Here Jess nails a top lift onto a lady's shoe
with the latest in a series of machines which, he says, have
reduced his trade to a science. This contrivance completes four
separate operations before you can think about it, saving time
and doing a neater job than most humans can.
* * * *
FOOTWEAR FOREVER:
Students Continue To Wear
ShoeStyles Ancestors Wore

Genuine LEVI'S
NEW $345
LOW PRICE
The Original Cowboy Dungaree

45
Men's Sizes

A PAIR FREE
If we are Undersold!
.A PAIR FREE
If They Rip!

L~OOK FORT)E
RED TAB-6N
1 TH ECK

ANN ARBOR CLOTHING
113 South Main

By JAMES GREGORY
Styles may come, last their giddy
day and go, but underneath all
those buttons, bows, and off-cen-
ter laces, people are wearing the
same kind of shoes they have for
centuries.
That's what Jess Brown says.
He has seen quite a few style
changes in his own eighteen years
of' repairing footwear for hard-
walking University students. Re-
pairmen, according to Brown, find
the same basic construction in
shoes year after year, whether the
toes be pointed or round, the heels
high, low, or indifferent.
* * *
THE CURRENT coed craze for
Louis XIV heels has had many an-
tecedent manias, since the day the
Sun King bid a last adieu to his
gathered courtiers and took off for
the hereafter. The concave heels
and severely pointed toes of the
Louis style were prominent among
the footwear of 100 years ago, and
appeared again, in modified form,
as recently as the twenties.
The University's driving ban,
another institution dating from
the twenties, has been the bane
of most well-heeled students,
but it has brought smiles to the
faces of campus shoe-repair
men that have not worn with
time. For the resultant increase
in student walking put rockets
into the shoe repair business,
ssending it up a full third over its
pre-ban level. It hasn't come
down yet.
Students, according to Brown,
are walkingest people you'd care
to meet on an all-day hike. This

p e d a l prognosticator estimates
that the average book-totter gives
his half soles six or seven miles'
wear every day he goes to classes.
THE TOP ITEMS among stu-
dent repairs are heels and soles for
men, and top-lifts for coeds. The
dainty top-lift, it appears, is rare-
ly good for more than a month's
walking, at the end of which it's a
likely patient for one of Mr.
Brown's newest machines.
This prodigious gadget fas-
tens new top-lifts onto heels. It
cuts a nail-sized hunk from a
roll of wire, drives it into the
top-lift, and heel, buries it be-
neath the surface of the lift, and
puts a head on it-all in the
space of a casual click.
The saddle-shoe fad a few years
ago threw a minor scare into the
retread business, the heels on said
shoes having an endurance nigh
onto that of concrete. But with
coed styles reverting to formality
and high heels, the good, old, un-
reliable top-lifts have come into
their own.
BROWN THINKS the business
of repairing shoes is a fine one-
shoe, heemphasizes. "People," he
says, "bring in everything they
can't get done anyplace else."
Brown is always willing to oblige
a customer, even those who bring
in damaged bicycle seats, baby
buggy tops, and purses. But when
a local matron walked into his
shop the other antemeridian, bear-
ing a rather weatherbeaten girdle,
well ...

116 North Fourth Ave.
Opposite Court House
Phone 2-2549

Assets Over $12,400,000

I

Ai

1h

U. S. NAVY 4l
'7 "T" SHIRTS 497
FIRST QUALITY - SIZES 30 to 44
OPEN TILL 6:30 P.M.
SAM'S STORE
122 East Washington

dMWA

.. .. .

I

1

While They Last...

I

DESIRABLE ITEMS STILL AVAILABLE
ON OUR OVERSTOCK SALE OF
COLUMBIA RECORDS
at

itZ

y

Is Here!

pring

50%
{
BACH: Sonatas for Harpsichord and Violin
Kirkpatrick and Schneider
DEBUSSY: Afternoon of a Faun .........
London Philharmonic under Beecham
GRIEG: Concerto in A Minor (in plastic)
Levant with N.Y. Philharmonic
HANDEL: The Messiah ................
Huddersfield Chorus etc. under Sagent

off

Regular
Price
. . $19.50.
.. 1.25
. . 9.00

27.00

Sale
Price
9.75
.63
4.50
13.50
3.50
3.63
4.50
3.63
.63

INTROP'S
TRILE DECKER
Got an appetite for the new and different? Then
tie into this rugged, triple soled Winthrop. It's novel,
corrugated, rubber sole will give you cushion ease
and caterpillar traction,
$ 9
: $

Here's a
Every one

Middle - Weight champion!
of these gabardines is perfect

MOZART: Symphony No. 40 in G Minor (in plastic )......
Pittsburgh Symphony under Reiner
RACHMANINOFF: Third Piano Concerto ...................
Cyril Smith with Birmingham Orchestra
SCHUMANN: Concerto in A Minor (in plastic) ................
Serkin with Philadelphia Orchestra
SIBELIUS: Second Symphony .............................. .
Philadelphia Orchestra under Ormandy
STRAUSS: Salome's Dance ................................ .
Cleveland Orchestra under Rodzinski

7.00
7.25
9.00

7.25
1.25

for spring . . . every one has the ease
and comfort of a summer-weight suit
PLUS the style and smartness of your
winter-weight clothing. It makes these
suits ideal for the business or pleasure
traveler prepared for uncertain weather
at any season and many wear 'em
the year round right at home. We have
the color you want, in both single and
double-breasted models.
Specially Priced
Regulars -- Shorts -- Longs
E® - C

6l

/

This sale is approaching its conclusion. Take advantage of the
tremendous savings while these top recordings
are still in stock.

El UI '\IUW13UE~jp~L.jdol.

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